How Disable Self Pingbacks in WordPress

Linking to your own posts also known as interlinking is great for SEO. However with pingbacks enabled on your site, interlinking posts can become annoying because WordPress automatically creates new pingback for that post. These pingback appear in the comments section of your posts. While… Read More »

To leave a comment please visit How Disable Self Pingbacks in WordPress on WPBeginner.

Linking to your own posts also known as interlinking is great for SEO. However with pingbacks enabled on your site, interlinking posts can become annoying because WordPress automatically creates new pingback for that post. These pingback appear in the comments section of your posts. While some users may like this feature, many users don’t find it useful. In this article, we will show you how to disable self pingbacks in WordPress.

Disable Self Pings

What is a Pingback?

Pingbacks give softwares the ability to communicate between websites. Its almost like remote comments. Think of it like this:

  1. We write a post on WPBeginner blog.
  2. Then you write a post on your blog mentioning/linking to our article.
  3. Your blogging software (WordPress) will automatically send us a pingback.
  4. Our blogging software (WordPresS) will receive the ping. It will then automatically go to your blog to confirm that the pingback originates there (check if the link is present).
  5. Then we will have the ability to display your pingback as a comment on our post. This will solely be a link to your site.

Pingbacks also work within your site. So if one of your posts link to another post, then your WordPress will send a self-ping. This can get really annoying.

Self Pingbacks on a WordPress site

Fore more details, take a look at our guide about trackbacks and pingbacks.

Now that you know what is a pingback, let’s take a look at how to disable self pingbacks.

There are multiple ways you can disable self pingbacks on your WordPress site. We will show you both plugin method and manual code method.

Disable Self Pingbacks in WordPress Using Plugins

There are two plugins that you can use to turn off self pings.

1. Using No Self Pings Plugin

First thing you need to do is install and activate the No Self Pings plugin. The plugin works out of the box, and there are no settings for you to configure. Simply activating the plugin will turn off self pingbacks.

You will notice that No Self Pings plugin hasn’t been updated for more than two years. Usually we do not recommend installing plugins that haven’t been updated this long. Simply because in most cases those plugins do not work. However, No Self Pings is very simple plugin, and it works even with the latest version of WordPress (4.2.3 At the time of writing this article).

We recommend you to read our guide on the issue of installing plugins not tested with your WordPress version.

2. Using Disabler Plugin

Simply install and activate the Disabler plugin. Upon activation, visit Settings » Disabler page to configure the plugin.

Disabler plugin settings page

You will notice that the plugin allows you to turn off several WordPress features. You need to scroll down to Back End Settings section and check the box next to Disable self pings option.

Click on the save changes button to store your settings.

Turn Off Self Pings Without Using a Plugin

If you do not want to use a plugin, then you can use these two methods to turn off self pings on your site.

1. Turn off Pingbacks Globally

WordPress allows you to turn off pingbacks on your site. By using this option will disable pingback feature completely on your site.

Simply go to Settings » Discussion page. Under the Default article settings section, uncheck the box next to ‘Attempt to notify any blogs linked to from the article’ option. Click on the save changes button to store your settings.

Disable all outgoing pinbacks from your site

2. Manually Insert Code to Disable Self Pingbacks

If you are comfortable with adding code snippets to your WordPress theme files, then you can use this method to switch off self pings.

Simply copy and paste this code in your theme’s functions.php file or a site-specific plugin.

function no_self_ping( &$links ) {
	$home = get_option( 'home' );
	foreach ( $links as $l => $link )
		if ( 0 === strpos( $link, $home ) )
			unset($links[$l]);
}

add_action( 'pre_ping', 'no_self_ping' );

That’s all, we hope this article helped you disable self pings on your WordPress site. You may also want to check our guide on how to put a stop on WordPress trackback spam.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

To leave a comment please visit How Disable Self Pingbacks in WordPress on WPBeginner.

I Tried VR and It Was Just OK

It’s been about a year and a half since I wrote The Road to VR, and a … few … things have happened since then.

  • Facebook bought Oculus for a skadillion dollars

  • I have to continually read thinkpieces describing how the mere act of strapping a VR headset on your

It's been about a year and a half since I wrote The Road to VR, and a … few … things have happened since then.

  • Facebook bought Oculus for a skadillion dollars

  • I have to continually read thinkpieces describing how the mere act of strapping a VR headset on your face is such a transformative, disruptive, rapturous experience that you'll never look at the world the same way again.

I am somewhat OK with the former, although the idea of my heroes John Carmack and Michael Abrash as Facebook employees still raises my hackles. But the latter is more difficult to stomach. And it just doesn't stop.

For example, this recent WSJ piece. (I can't link directly to it, you have to click through from Google search results to get past the paywall).

I’ll spare you the rapturous account of the time I sculpted in three dimensions with light, fire, leaves and rainbows inside what felt like a real-life version of a holodeck from “Star Trek.” Writing about VR is like fiction about sex—seldom believable and never up to the task.

If you really want to understand how compelling VR is, you just have to try it. And I guarantee you will. At some point in the next couple of years, one of your already-converted friends will insist you experience it, the same way someone gave you your first turn at a keyboard or with a touch screen. And it will be no less a transformative experience.

I don't mean to call out the author here. There are a dozen other similarly breathless VR articles I could cite, where an amazing VR wonderland is looming right around the corner, any day now. The hype levels are off the charts. And if you haven't tried it, boy, you just don't know! It can't be explained, it must be experienced! There are people who honestly believe that in 5 years nobody will make non-VR games any more.

Well, I have experienced modern VR. A lot. I've tried both the Oculus DK1, the Oculus DK2, and a 360° backpack-and-controllers Survios rig, which looks something like this:

Based on those experiences, I can't reconcile these hype levels with what I felt. Right now, VR is not something I'd unconditionally recommend to a fellow avid gamer, much less a casual gamer.

To be honest, when I tried the DK1 and DK2, after a few hours of demos and exploration, I couldn't wait to get the headset off. Not because I was motion sick – I don't get motion sick, and never have – but because I was bored. And a little frustrated by control limitations. Not exactly the stuff transformative world-changing disruption is made of.

Here's what that experience looks like, by the way. You can practically feel the gaming excitement dripping off me.

And if you don't find watching me experience my virtual world fascinating, although I can't imagine why, I suppose you can enjoy what's on my screen:

Chroma-shifted, stereographic, fisheye VR gibberish.

I've always been the first kid on my block to recommend an awesome, transformative gaming experience, from the Atari 2600 to the Kinect. I mean, that's kind of who I am, isn't it? The alpha geek, the guy who owned a Vectrex and thought vector graphics were the cat's pajamas, the guy who bought one of the first copies of Guitar Hero in 2005 and would not shut up about it. For that matter I dragged my buddies to a VR storefront in Boulder, Colorado circa 1993 so we could play Dactyl Nightmare. And I have to say, in my alpha geek opinion, VR has a long way to go before it'll be ready for the smartphone levels of adoption that media pundits imply is just around the corner.

I apologize if this comes off as negative, and no, I haven't tried the magical new VR headset models that are Just Around The Corner and Will Change Everything. I'll absolutely try them when they are available. Let me be clear that I think the technical challenges around VR are deep, hard, and fascinating, and I could not be happier that some of the best programmers of our generation are working on this stuff.

But from what I've seen and experienced to date, there is just no way that VR is going to be remotely mainstream in 5 years. I'm doubtful that can happen in a decade or even two decades, to be honest, but a smart person always hedges their bets when trying to predict the future.

I think the current state of VR, or at least the "strap a nice smartphone or two on your face" version of it, has quite a few fundamental physical problems to deal with before it has any chance of being mainstream.

It should be as convenient as a pair of glasses

Nobody "enjoys" strapping two pounds of stuff on their face unless they are in a hazardous materials situation. We can barely get people to wear bicycle helmets, and yet they are going to be lining up around the block to slap this awkward, gangly VR contraption on their face? Existing VR headsets get awfully sweaty after 30 minutes of use, and they're also difficult to fit over glasses. The idea of gaming with a heavy, sweaty, uncomfortable headset on for hours at a time isn't too appealing – and that's coming from a guy who thinks nothing of spending 6 hours in a gaming jag with headphones on.

For VR to be quick and easy and pervasive, the headset would need to be so miniaturized as to be basically invisible – akin to putting on a cool pair of sunglasses.

Maybe current VR headsets are like the old brick cellphones from the 90's. The question is, how quickly can they get from 1990 to 2007?

It should be wireless

The world has been inexorably moving towards wireless everything, but in this regard VR headsets are a glorious throwback to science fiction movies from the 1970s. Your VR headset and everything else on it will be physically wired, in multiple ways, to a powerful computer. Wires, wires, everywhere, as far as your eyes … can't see.

Even the cheaper VR headsets that let you drop a high end smartphone in for a limited VR experience have to be wired to power, as phones are not built for the continuous heavy-duty CPU and GPU rendering that VR requires. Overheating is a very real problem.

Wireless video is hard to do well, particularly at the 1440p resolutions that are the absolute minimum for practical VR. On top of that, good VR requires much higher framerates, ideally 120fps. That kind of ultra low latency, super high resolution video delivered wirelessly, is quite far off.

It should have 4k resolution

Since the VR device you're looking at is inches from your eyes – and the resolution is effectively divided in half for each eye (there are a few emerging VR headsets that use two smartphones here instead of one) – an extremely high resolution screen is needed to achieve effective visual resolutions that are quite ancient by modern computer standards.

The Oculus DK1 at 720p was so low resolution that I consider it borderline unusable even as a demo unit. I'd estimate that it felt roughly DOOM resolution, or 320x240.

The DK2 at 1080p was marginally better, but the pixelation and shimmer was quite bad, a serious distraction from immersion. It felt roughly Quake resolution, or 640x480.

I know many upcoming VR devices are 1440p or 2560 × 1440. I strongly suspect that, in practice, is going to feel like yet another mild bump to effective 1024x768 resolution.

I'm used to modern games and modern graphics resolutions. Putting on a VR headset shouldn't be a one-way ticket to jarring, grainy, pixelated graphics the like of which I haven't seen since 1999. There are definitely 4k smartphones out there on the horizon which could solve this problem, but the power required to drive them, by that I mean the CPU, GPU, and literal battery power – is far from trivial.

(And did I mention it needs to be a minimum of 60fps, ideally 120fps for the best VR experience? I'm pretty sure I mentioned that.)

Still, the 4k resolution problem is probably the closest to being reasonably solved on current hardware trajectories in about five years or so, albeit driven by very high end hardware, not a typical smartphone, which brings me to …

It should not require a high end gaming PC or future gen console

VR has massive CPU and GPU system requirements, somewhat beyond what you'd need for the latest videogames. Which means by definition cutting edge VR is developed with, and best experienced on, a high end Windows PC.

Imagine the venture capitalists who invested in Oculus, who have probably been Mac-only since the early aughts, trying to scrounge together a gaming PC so they can try this crazy new VR thing they just invested in. That's some culture shock.

Current generation consoles such as the Xbox 360 and PS4 may be fine with (most) games running at 1080p, on the PS4 at least, but they are both woefully under-specced to do VR in both GPU and CPU power. That's bad news if you expect VR to be mainstream in the lifetime of these new consoles over the next 5-8 years, and were counting on the console market to get there.

VR on current generation consoles will be a slow, crippled, low resolution experience, about on the level of the Oculus DK2. You'll be waiting quite a while for the next generation of consoles beyond these to deliver decent VR.

Hands (Gloves?) must be supported

I was extremely frustrated by the lack of control options in the Oculus DK1 and DK2. Here I was looking around and exploring this nifty VR world, but to do anything I had to tap a key on my keyboard, or move and click my mouse. Talk about breaking immersion. They bundle an Xbox controller with the upcoming Rift, which is no better. Experiencing VR with a controller is like playing Guitar Hero with a controller.

The most striking thing about the Survios demo rig I used was the way I could use my hands to manipulate things in the VR world. Adding hands to VR was revelatory, the one bit of VR I've experienced to date that I can say I was honestly blown away by. I could reach out and grab objects, rotate things in my hands and move them close to my face to look at them, hold a shotgun and cock it with two hands, and so forth. With my hands, it was amazing. The primary controllers you should need in VR are the ones you were born with: your hands.

A virtual world experienced with just your head is quite disappointing and passive, like a movie or an on-rails ride. But add hands, and suddenly you are there because you can now interact with that VR world in a profoundly human way: by touching it. I could see myself playing story exploration games like or Gone Home in VR, if I can use my hands – to manipulate things, to look at them and turn them in my hands and check them out, was incredible. This made it so much more "real" for me.

The good news is that there are solutions like Oculus Touch. The bad news is that's it's not bundled by default, but should be. This device tracks hand position, plus rotation, and adds some buttons for interaction. Even better would be simple gloves you could wear that visually tracked each finger – but sometimes you need a button, because if you are holding a gun you need to indicate that you fired a gun which would be quite hairy to track via "trigger finger" movement.

I'm optimistic that VR and hand control will hopefully become synonymous, otherwise we're locking ourselves into a passive "look around" mindset, which leads to crappy, passive VR that's little more than a different kind of Imax 3D movie.

It must compete with mature 2D entertainment

I get frustrated talking to people who act like VR exists in a vacuum, that there are suddenly no other games worth playing unless they are somehow experienced in 3D.

I've experimented with 3D on computers since the days of crappy battery powered LCD shutter glasses. The world has experienced the glory of 3D television … and collectively turned its head and said "meh".

Experiencing something in 3D, in and of itself, is just not that compelling. If it was, people would have scarfed up 3D TVs, see only 3D movies, and play only 3D video games on their PCs and consoles regularly. The technology to do it is there, battle tested, and completely mature. I know because I saw Captain EO at Epcot Center in 3D way back in 1985, and it was amazing thirty years ago!

I recently saw Gravity in IMAX 3D and I liked it, but it didn't transform my moviegoing experience such that I could never imagine seeing another boring flat 2D movie ever again.

People have so many amazing social experiences gathered around common 2D screens. Watching a movie, watching a TV show, watching someone play a game. These are fundamentally joyous, shared human experiences. For this to work with VR is kinda-sorta possible, but difficult, because:

  • You need a proper flat 2D representation of what the VR user is seeing

  • That 2D representation must be broadcast on the primary display device

VR is ultra resource intensive already, so rendering yet another copy of the scene at reasonable framerates (say, constant 60fps) isn't going to be easy. Or free.

On top of that, the VR user is probably wearing headphones, holding a pair of hand controllers, and can't see anything, so they can't interact with anyone who is physically there very well.

I've had incredible gaming experiences on 2D screens. I recently played Alien: Isolation, or as I like to call it, Pants Crapping Simulator 3000, and I thought it was one of the most amazing, immersive, and goddamn terrifying gameplay experiences I've had in years. I was starring in a movie – it felt like I was there in every sense of the word.

At no point did I think to myself "this would be better in 3D". In many ways, it would have been worse.

Good God man, do you ever shut up?

Sorry. I had some things to get off my chest with regards to VR. I'll wrap it up.

I apologize if this post came off as negative. Writing this, I actually got a little more excited about VR. I can see how far it has to come to match its potential, because the technical problems it presents are quite hard – and those are the most fun problems to attack.

I guess I might be the only person left on Earth who said, hey, I tried VR and it was just OK. I think it ought to be a hell of a lot better, and has to be if it wants to be truly pervasive.

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Apt-Get for Windows – OneGet and Chocolatey on Windows 10

In 2013 I asked the questions “Is the Windows user ready for apt-get?” As with nearly all my blog posts, the comments are better than the post itself. 😉

Now it’s 2015 and many of us are upgrading to Windows 10. One of the little gems in Windows 10 that no one is talking about (yet) is OneGet. You can read about OneGet architecture here.

Installing applications in Windows 10 from the command line

It’s easy (and wrong) to just say that One-Get is Apt-Get for Windows. But OneGet isn’t actually a package manager. It’s more clever and cooler than that.  It’s a package manager manager.

OneGet is a Manager of Package Managers 

Go out to you Windows 10 PowerShell prompt now and type “Get-PackageProvider” and you’ll see the package managers you have registered with OneGet today.

C:> Get-PackageProvider

Name Version
---- -------
Programs 10.0.10240.16384
msu 10.0.10240.16384
msi 10.0.10240.16384
PSModule 1.0.0.0

Usually programs are installed with things like MSIs, for example, so there’s a provider for that. You can type “Get-Package” and see the programs AND packages on your machine:

C:> Get-Package

Name Version
---- -------
123D Design R1.6 1.6.41
Windows Driver Package - Ge... 06/04/2011 8....
Windows Driver Package - Ge... 06/19/2014 8....
Windows Driver Package - FT... 01/27/2014 2....
JRuby 1.7.19 1.7.19
Windows Driver Package - ST... 11/09/2009 3....
EPSON NX410 Series Printer ...
Intel Edison Device USB driver 1.2.1

Since it’s PowerShell, you can sort and filter and what-not to your heart’s delight.

OneGet isn’t Microsoft’s Chocolately

Chocolatey is an open source apt-get-like machine-wide package manager that you can use today, even if you don’t have Windows 10.

OneGet isn’t Microsoft’s version of Chocolately. But there is a beta/preview Chocolatey provider that plugs into OneGet so you can use OneGet to get Chocolatey packages and install them.

Other things worth noting, even though OneGet is in the box for Windows 10, you can still run it on Windows 7 and Windows 2008 R2. Plus, OneGet isn’t done and it’s open source so there’s lots of cool possibilities.

Oh, and an important naming point. Just like “Chromium” is the open source browser and “Chrome” is the Google packaged instance of that project, “OneGet” is the open source project and what ships with Windows 10 is just generically “PackageManagement.” Just a good reminder of the relationship between open source projects and their shipping counterparts.

Installing VLC using OneGet and Chocolatey on Windows 10

Example time. You’ve got a new Windows 10 machine and you want to get VLC. You can (and should) totally get it from the Windows Store, but let’s get it using Package Management.

Here I need to get the beta Chocotlatey provider first, and once, with “get-packageprovider -name chocolatey.” Also, when I install a package for the first time it will prompt to download NuGet as well. I will answer Yes to both.

NOTE: You can also install Chocolatey explicitly with “install-package –provider bootstrap chocolatey”

Now I can just “install-package vlc” and it will get it from the Chocolatey repository.

C:>  get-packageprovider -name chocolatey

The provider 'chocolatey v2.8.5.130' is not installed.
chocolatey may be manually downloaded from https://oneget.org/ChocolateyPr30.exe and installed.
Would you like PackageManagement to automatically download and install 'chocolatey'?

[Y] Yes [N] No [S] Suspend [?] Help (default is "Y"): y

Name Version
---- -------
Chocolatey 2.8.5.130

C:> install-package vlc

The provider 'nuget v2.8.5.127' is not installed.
nuget may be manually downloaded from https://oneget.org/nuget-anycpu-2.8.5.127.exe and installed.
Would you like PackageManagement to automatically download and install 'nuget' now?
[Y] Yes [N] No [S] Suspend [?] Help (default is "Y"): y

The package(s) come from a package source that is not marked as trusted.
Are you sure you want to install software from 'chocolatey'?
[Y] Yes [A] Yes to All [N] No [L] No to All [S] Suspend [?] Help (default is "N"): y

Name Version Source Summary
---- ------- ------ -------
vlc 2.2.1.20150630 chocolatey VLC Media Player

Boom. Now VLC is installed. It’s early days but it’s interesting stuff!

You can read about the available OneGet cmdlets at https://github.com/OneGet/oneget/wiki/cmdlets.

For example here I can find the latest version of zoomit.

C:> find-package -name zoomit

Name Version Source
---- ------- ------
zoomit 4.50 chocolate

Just to be clear, with regards to OneGet and Chocolatey.

  1. It’s an unsupported version of Chocolatey provider in a GitHub repo
  2. Folks can download it using OneGet cmdlets and then using the unsupported provider, you can download Chocolatey packages.
  3. Microsoft is working with the community to take ownership of Chocolatey provider.

And again, you can use Chocolatey TODAY on your Windows 7 and up machines as it is.

Managing MSI-installed Programs with OneGet and PackageManagement

OneGet and PackageManagement in Windows 10 lets you manage package managers of all kinds to control what’s installed one your machines. For example, I can uninstall an MSI installed program like this. This is just like visiting Add/Remove Programs (ARP) and uninstalling, except I did it from the command line!

C:> Uninstall-Package join.me.launcher

Name Version
---- -------
join.me.launcher 1.0.368.0

MSI and Chocolately are just the start for OneGet. What if one package management API could also get Python or PHP packages? Windows Store apps?

OneGet Architecture Diagram - The End user calls PackageManagement APIs that delgate to installed provders that install packages from the original location

Donate to help Chocolatey

Last, but definitely not least, it’s important to remember that Chocolatey and the Chocolatey Repository of Packages can use your help and sponsorship. Head over to https://chocolatey.org/ and scroll to the bottom and click Donate and you can Paypal or use your Credit Card to help them out.


Sponsor: Big thanks to our friends at Infragistics for sponsoring the feed this week! Responsive web design on any browser, any platform and any device with Infragistics jQuery/HTML5 Controls.  Get super-charged performance with the world’s fastest HTML5 Grid –Download for free now!


© 2015 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

In 2013 I asked the questions "Is the Windows user ready for apt-get?" As with nearly all my blog posts, the comments are better than the post itself. ;)

Now it's 2015 and many of us are upgrading to Windows 10. One of the little gems in Windows 10 that no one is talking about (yet) is OneGet. You can read about OneGet architecture here.

Installing applications in Windows 10 from the command line

It's easy (and wrong) to just say that One-Get is Apt-Get for Windows. But OneGet isn't actually a package manager. It's more clever and cooler than that.  It's a package manager manager.

OneGet is a Manager of Package Managers 

Go out to you Windows 10 PowerShell prompt now and type "Get-PackageProvider" and you'll see the package managers you have registered with OneGet today.

C:> Get-PackageProvider


Name Version
---- -------
Programs 10.0.10240.16384
msu 10.0.10240.16384
msi 10.0.10240.16384
PSModule 1.0.0.0

Usually programs are installed with things like MSIs, for example, so there's a provider for that. You can type "Get-Package" and see the programs AND packages on your machine:

C:> Get-Package


Name Version
---- -------
123D Design R1.6 1.6.41
Windows Driver Package - Ge... 06/04/2011 8....
Windows Driver Package - Ge... 06/19/2014 8....
Windows Driver Package - FT... 01/27/2014 2....
JRuby 1.7.19 1.7.19
Windows Driver Package - ST... 11/09/2009 3....
EPSON NX410 Series Printer ...
Intel Edison Device USB driver 1.2.1

Since it's PowerShell, you can sort and filter and what-not to your heart's delight.

OneGet isn't Microsoft's Chocolately

Chocolatey is an open source apt-get-like machine-wide package manager that you can use today, even if you don't have Windows 10.

OneGet isn't Microsoft's version of Chocolately. But there is a beta/preview Chocolatey provider that plugs into OneGet so you can use OneGet to get Chocolatey packages and install them.

Other things worth noting, even though OneGet is in the box for Windows 10, you can still run it on Windows 7 and Windows 2008 R2. Plus, OneGet isn't done and it's open source so there's lots of cool possibilities.

Oh, and an important naming point. Just like "Chromium" is the open source browser and "Chrome" is the Google packaged instance of that project, "OneGet" is the open source project and what ships with Windows 10 is just generically "PackageManagement." Just a good reminder of the relationship between open source projects and their shipping counterparts.

Installing VLC using OneGet and Chocolatey on Windows 10

Example time. You've got a new Windows 10 machine and you want to get VLC. You can (and should) totally get it from the Windows Store, but let's get it using Package Management.

Here I need to get the beta Chocotlatey provider first, and once, with "get-packageprovider -name chocolatey." Also, when I install a package for the first time it will prompt to download NuGet as well. I will answer Yes to both.

NOTE: You can also install Chocolatey explicitly with "install-package –provider bootstrap chocolatey"

Now I can just "install-package vlc" and it will get it from the Chocolatey repository.

C:>  get-packageprovider -name chocolatey


The provider 'chocolatey v2.8.5.130' is not installed.
chocolatey may be manually downloaded from https://oneget.org/ChocolateyPr30.exe and installed.
Would you like PackageManagement to automatically download and install 'chocolatey'?

[Y] Yes [N] No [S] Suspend [?] Help (default is "Y"): y

Name Version
---- -------
Chocolatey 2.8.5.130

C:> install-package vlc

The provider 'nuget v2.8.5.127' is not installed.
nuget may be manually downloaded from https://oneget.org/nuget-anycpu-2.8.5.127.exe and installed.
Would you like PackageManagement to automatically download and install 'nuget' now?
[Y] Yes [N] No [S] Suspend [?] Help (default is "Y"): y

The package(s) come from a package source that is not marked as trusted.
Are you sure you want to install software from 'chocolatey'?
[Y] Yes [A] Yes to All [N] No [L] No to All [S] Suspend [?] Help (default is "N"): y

Name Version Source Summary
---- ------- ------ -------
vlc 2.2.1.20150630 chocolatey VLC Media Player

Boom. Now VLC is installed. It's early days but it's interesting stuff!

You can read about the available OneGet cmdlets at https://github.com/OneGet/oneget/wiki/cmdlets.

For example here I can find the latest version of zoomit.

C:> find-package -name zoomit


Name Version Source
---- ------- ------
zoomit 4.50 chocolate

Just to be clear, with regards to OneGet and Chocolatey.

  1. It's an unsupported version of Chocolatey provider in a GitHub repo
  2. Folks can download it using OneGet cmdlets and then using the unsupported provider, you can download Chocolatey packages.
  3. Microsoft is working with the community to take ownership of Chocolatey provider.

And again, you can use Chocolatey TODAY on your Windows 7 and up machines as it is.

Managing MSI-installed Programs with OneGet and PackageManagement

OneGet and PackageManagement in Windows 10 lets you manage package managers of all kinds to control what's installed one your machines. For example, I can uninstall an MSI installed program like this. This is just like visiting Add/Remove Programs (ARP) and uninstalling, except I did it from the command line!

C:> Uninstall-Package join.me.launcher


Name Version
---- -------
join.me.launcher 1.0.368.0

MSI and Chocolately are just the start for OneGet. What if one package management API could also get Python or PHP packages? Windows Store apps?

OneGet Architecture Diagram - The End user calls PackageManagement APIs that delgate to installed provders that install packages from the original location

Donate to help Chocolatey

Last, but definitely not least, it's important to remember that Chocolatey and the Chocolatey Repository of Packages can use your help and sponsorship. Head over to https://chocolatey.org/ and scroll to the bottom and click Donate and you can Paypal or use your Credit Card to help them out.


Sponsor: Big thanks to our friends at Infragistics for sponsoring the feed this week! Responsive web design on any browser, any platform and any device with Infragistics jQuery/HTML5 Controls.  Get super-charged performance with the world’s fastest HTML5 Grid -Download for free now!



© 2015 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

How to Style Contact Form 7 Forms in WordPress

With over 1 million active users, Contact Form 7 is one of the most popular contact form plugins for WordPress. Their biggest downside is that the out of the box forms you add are very plain looking. Thanksfully, Contact Form 7 can be easily styled… Read More »

To leave a comment please visit How to Style Contact Form 7 Forms in WordPress on WPBeginner.

With over 1 million active users, Contact Form 7 is one of the most popular contact form plugins for WordPress. Their biggest downside is that the out of the box forms you add are very plain looking. Thanksfully, Contact Form 7 can be easily styled using CSS in your WordPress theme. In this article, we will show you how to style contact form 7 forms in WordPress.

Getting Started

We are assuming that you have already installed Contact Form 7 plugin and have created your first contact form. The next step is to copy the shortcode for your contact form and paste it in a WordPress post or a page where you would like your form to appear.

For the sake of this article, we have used the default contact form and added it into a WordPress page. This is how the contact form looked on our test site.

Default Contact Form 7 form on a WordPress site using  default WordPress theme

As you can see that the contact form inherits some form styles from your WordPress theme. Apart from that it’s very basic.

We will be styling Contact Form 7 forms using CSS. All the CSS goes into your theme or child theme‘s stylesheet.

Styling Contact Form 7 Forms in WordPress

Contact Form 7 generates a very useful and standard compliant code for the forms. Each element in the form has a proper ID and CSS class associated with it.

Each contact form uses the CSS class .wpcf7 which you can use to style your form.

In this example we are using a Google font Lora in our input fields. See how to add Google Fonts in WordPress.

div.wpcf7 { 
background-color: #fbefde;
border: 1px solid #f28f27;
padding:20px;
}
.wpcf7 input[type="text"],
.wpcf7 input[type="email"],
.wpcf7 textarea {
background:#725f4c;
color:#FFF;
font-family:lora, sans-serif; 
font-style:italic;    
}
.wpcf7 input[type="submit"],
.wpcf7 input[type="button"] { 
background-color:#725f4c;
width:100%;
text-align:center;
text-transform:uppercase;
}

This is how our contact form looked after applying this CSS.

Styling Contact Form 7 forms with CSS in WordPress

Styling Multiple Contact Form 7 Forms

The problem with the CSS we used above is that it will be applied to all Contact Form 7 forms on your website. If you are using multiple contact forms and want to style them differently, then you will need to use the ID generated by contact form 7 for each form.

Simply open a page containing the form you want to modify. Take your mouse to the first field in the form, right click and select Inspect Element. The browser screen will split, and you will see the source code of the page. In the source code, you need to locate the starting line of the form code.

Finding the element ID for your contact form

As you can see in the screenshot above, our contact form code starts with the line:

<div role="form" class="wpcf7" id="wpcf7-f201-p203-o1" lang="en-US" dir="ltr">

The id attribute is a unique identifier generated by Contact Form 7 for this particular form. It is a combination of form id and the post id where this form is added.

We will use this ID in our CSS to style our contact form. We will replace .wpcf7 in our first CSS snippet with #wpcf7-f201-p203-o1.

div#wpcf7-f201-p203-o1{ 
background-color: #fbefde;
border: 1px solid #f28f27;
padding:20px;
}
#wpcf7-f201-p203-o1 input[type="text"],
#wpcf7-f201-p203-o1 input[type="email"],
#wpcf7-f201-p203-o1 textarea {
background:#725f4c;
color:#FFF;
font-family:lora, "Open Sans", sans-serif; 
font-style:italic;    
}
#wpcf7-f201-p203-o1 input[type="submit"],
#wpcf7-f201-p203-o1 input[type="button"] { 
background-color:#725f4c;
width:100%;
text-align:center;
text-transform:uppercase;
}

Styling Contact Form 7 Forms with CSS Hero

Many WordPress beginners don’t have any experience of writing CSS, and they don’t want to spend time learning it. Luckily, there is a wonderful solution for beginners that will allow you to not just style your contact form but almost every aspect of your WordPress site.

Simply install and activate the CSS Hero plugin and go to the page containing your form. Click on the CSS Hero toolbar and then click on the element you want to style. CSS Hero will provide you an easy user interface to edit the CSS without ever writing any code.

Styling Contact Form 7 Form Using CSS Hero

See our complete review of CSS Hero and how to use it to style anything on your WordPress site. You can use CSS Hero coupon code WPBeginner to get exclusive 34% off discount.

That’s all we hope this article helped you learn how to style Contact Form 7 forms in WordPress. You may also want to see our guide on how to add a contact form popup in WordPress.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

To leave a comment please visit How to Style Contact Form 7 Forms in WordPress on WPBeginner.

How to Add a Progress Bar in Your WordPress Posts

Have you ever wanted to add a progress bar in your WordPress site? You can use it to show progress on a fundraising campaign, milestones for specific project that you are working on, etc. Recently one of our readers asked how they can add a… Read More »

To leave a comment please visit How to Add a Progress Bar in Your WordPress Posts on WPBeginner.

Have you ever wanted to add a progress bar in your WordPress site? You can use it to show progress on a fundraising campaign, milestones for specific project that you are working on, etc. Recently one of our readers asked how they can add a progress bar in a WordPress post. In this article, we will show you how to add a progress bar in your WordPress posts, pages, and widgets.

First thing you need to do is install and activate the Progress Bar plugin. It works out of the box, and there are no settings for you to configure.

Simply edit a post or page where you want to display the progress bar and add the shortcode in this format:

[wppb progress=50]

This will show an animated progress bar to indicate 50% progress using the default blue color.

Default shortcode to display progress bar

Pretty easy right?

You can also customize the shortcode to change colors, add text to the progress bar, show currency instead of percentage, and more. Let’s take a look at some of these customization options.

Adding Text to the Progress Bar

In the example above, you can see that our progress bar does not actually mention what it is about. You can change that by adding some helpful text within the progress bar using the text attribute in the shortcode.

[wppb progress=75 text="Progress so far"]

This will display your text on top of the progress bar, and it will look like this:

Progress bar in WordPress with text on top of it

Showing Currency Instead of Percentage in Progress Bar

By default, the progress bar shows completion percentage, but you can change that to a currency if you’re using it for a fundraising campaign.

Here is how you would use the shortcode to display the currency and indicate both the target amount and the amount collected so far.

[wppb progress="$250/1000" text="$250/$1000 Raised"]

It will look like this on your website:

Showing a progress bar with currency

If you want to show the text outside the progress bar, then you can modify the shortcode like this:

[wppb progress="$250/1000" text="$250/$1000 Raised" location="after"]

Changing Progress Bar Colors and Appearance

Progress Bar plugin comes with a few colors and appearance options that you can use. The built-in color options are blue, red, yellow, orange, and green. However, you can use any color that you want. You can add a flat or animated progress bar.

Here is how you will use the shortcode to use each option:

Orange progress bar
[wppb progress=50 option=orange]

Animated candy stripe progress bar in red
[wppb progress=50 option="animated-candystripe red"]

Candy stripe progress bar in green color
[wppb progress=50 option="candystripe green"]

A default blue progress bar with candy stripe
[wppb progress=50 option=candystripe]

A flat progress bar in purple color
[wppb progress=50 option=flat color=purple]

A flat candy stripe progress bar in brown
[wppb progress=50 option="flat candystripe" color=brown]

This is how these progress bars will look on your site:

Using colors and changing appearance of progress bar

Adding Progress Bar in WordPress Sidebar Widgets

First you will need to enable shortcodes for text widgets in WordPress. You can do this by adding the following line of code in your theme’s functions.php file or in a site-specific plugin.

add_filter('widget_text','do_shortcode');

You can now visit Appearance » Widgets page and add a text widget to your sidebar. Use the progress bar shortcode in the text widget just like you would use it in a post or page. Here is a code we used on our demo site:

[wppb progress="$2500/$4500" option="animated-candystripe red" fullwidth=true]

Raised: $2500
Goal: $4500

<a href="example.com">Donate here</a>

This is how it looked on our test site:

Adding progress bar in a WordPress text widget

We hope this article helped you add beautiful progress bar in your WordPress posts or pages. You may also want to see our guide on How to Add a PayPal Donate Button in WordPress.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

To leave a comment please visit How to Add a Progress Bar in Your WordPress Posts on WPBeginner.

Which is the Best WordPress Slider? Performance + Quality Compared

Are you looking to add a slider in your WordPress site? Tired of going through hundreds of WordPress slider plugins to see which one is the best? Well you’re in the right place. In this article, we will compare 5 of the top WordPress slider… Read More »

To leave a comment please visit Which is the Best WordPress Slider? Performance + Quality Compared on WPBeginner.

Are you looking to add a slider in your WordPress site? Tired of going through hundreds of WordPress slider plugins to see which one is the best? Well you’re in the right place. In this article, we will compare 5 of the top WordPress slider plugins based on their speed, ease of use, and overall features. The goal is to find which is the best WordPress slider plugin.

Many WPBeginner readers, quickly graduate the beginner level and step into theme customization. One of the most often asked questions by our readers is what is the best WordPress slider plugin? In this article, we will try to answer that question by comparing some of the best WordPress sliders for performance and quality.

The Problem With WordPress Sliders

Most WordPress sliders are slow. If it is not properly coded, a slider can significantly increase your page load time. If you do not have a good WordPress hosting service, your server may respond even slower than normal.

The other problem with WordPress slider plugins is ease of use. Most of them are bloated and come with a learning curve for beginners.

Last but not least, you want to make sure that your WordPress slider is responsive. A lot of them are not.

So how do you go through hundreds of sliders plugin and check for all of this? Well you don’t have to. We did the research for you and below are our results for the best WordPress slider.

The Contenders for Best WordPress Slider Plugin

For the sake of this article, we chose 5 of the top and highly recommended WordPress slider plugins. While doing our research, we noticed that these slider plugins were among the most used and recommended. We decided to run some simple tests and see how each one of them performs. The criteria we are looking for is speed, ease-of-use, features, and compatibility.

Speed

Page load time and speed are an important factor to consider when adding a slider to your WordPress site. As mentioned earlier, not only a slow site affects user experience, but it also hurts your search engine rankings. This is why slider speed is our #1 priority during this test.

Slider Plugin Page Load time Requests Page size
Soliloquy 1.34 secs 26 945 KB
Nivo Slider 2.12 secs 29 1 MB
Meteor 2.32 secs 27 1.2 MB
Revolution Slider 2.25 secs 29 1 MB
LayerSlider 2.12 secs 30 975 KB

As you can see in the above scores, Soliloquy was the fastest loading WordPress slider in our tests. The reason why it is the fastest loading slider is that the code is optimized for speed.

The plugin also uses a neat little trick. It loads your cover slide and then rest of the slides are loaded asynchronously. It is not just fast on tests, it feels fast to your visitors too.

If you want a high performance fast WordPress site, then Soliloquy is the best WordPress slider for you.

Ease of Use

Creating sliders is not as simple as we would like it to be. The goal here is to find a plugin that even beginner level users can use to create sliders both quickly and easily.

Soliloquy

We have worked on and tested many WordPress slider plugins, but so far we have found none as easy to use as Soliloquy. Installing it and creating a slider in it is extremely simple (see our guide on how to easily create a responsive WordPress slider with Soliloquy).

The reason why it’s easy to use is because it uses the WordPress coding guidelines and blends in with your native WordPress admin interface. Soliloquy has a simple but intuitive user interface to create slides using the default WordPress media uploader.

Creating a slideshow with Soliloquy WordPress slider plugin

There are shortcodes, template tags, a button on post editor, and widget to add your slides to different sections of your website.

Nivo Slider

Creating a slider with Nivo Slider was easy and quite straight forward. You can choose the images from the media uploader, and upload multiple new images at once. You can also drag and rearrange slide order. Using the same media uploader interface, you can add captions, link, and alternate text to your slide images. It comes with shortcodes and template tags so you can add a slider to your posts, pages, and template files.

Creating a WordPress Slider using Nivo Slider plugin

Nivo Slider does not support video and other multimedia type. Meaning this is limited to only image slideshows. It comes with a nice bundle of themes that you can use and lots of transition effects to choose from. Plugin settings, creating slideshows, and adding slides to posts/pages is all very straight forward and smooth. However, if you are counting on features and options, then Nivo falls behind Soliloquy.

Meteor Slides

When creating a slideshow with Meteor Slides you need to upload or select each slide individually. This is time consuming and many new users would probably find it confusing. After installing the plugin, go to Slides » Add New. Give this particular slide a title, and then click on set featured image to upload your slide.

If you want your slide to link to a page, then you can enter a URL. Lastly, you need to choose a Slideshow from Slideshows meta box.

Meteor Slides

You can not arrange the slide order in a slideshow. You can not add a video slide, or add text over your slide. This makes Meteor Slide very limited in functionality. However, it is useful if all you want to do is add a simple slideshow.

Revolution Slider

Creating a slider with Revolution Slider is not as straight forward because it separates the slider and slides creation process. When create a slider, you will see all the customization options such as resizing, thumbnails, animations, etc, but you will not see the ability to add slides which is confusing.

Revolution Slider

After creating your slider, you have to come back to the slider list in order to find a button to add your slides.

The user interface looks and feels different than rest of the WordPress UI. There are way too many options and the user interface does not help you easily locate the ones you need.

LayerSlider

LayerSlider is similar to the Revolution Slider because it has it’s own user interface which does not match rest of the WordPress UI. There are far too many customization options which can be good for some, but may complicate the creation process for beginners.

LayerSlider

Creating your first slider with LayerSlider is not intuitive however there are helpful links to documentation that can help you get started.

Features

If all you want to do is create simple image slide shows, then Nivo Slider and Meteor Slides are both good enough to work with.

Soliloquy, Revolution Slider, and LayerSlider come with a lot more features. They are fully responsive and look equally beautiful on all devices and screen sizes. All three of them support video slides, HTML 5 videos, featured content slides, themes, animations and transitions.

Revolution Slider and Layer Slider both have their own user interface that may feel complicated to new users specially since these plugins bundle all the features in one.

On the other hand, Soliloquy offers a much easier and friendlier user interface to take advantage of all the features. Instead of packing everything in one plugin, Soliloquy uses addons for advanced features which allows you to install only what you need and keep your site bloat free.

Pricing

Another decisive factor that might help users choose a slider plugin for their site is pricing. Here is the price for a single site license of these plugins. Meteor Slider is a free plugin so it is not listed here:

Slider Plugin Single Site License
Soliloquy $19
Nivo Slider $29
Revolution Slider $18
LayerSlider $17

After comparing these plugins we feel that the best WordPress slider plugin award goes to:

Soliloquy

Soliloquy is by far the fastest WordPress slider plugin in the market. It follows all of the coding best practices, it is very well documented, it is easy to extend for developers and even easier to use for users, and last but not least it is also the cheapest.

Use our Soliloquy Coupon to get an extra 25% off.

We hope this article answers the questions regarding the best WordPress slider plugin in terms of performance and quality. Which is your favorite WordPress slider plugin? Let us know by sending a tweet to @wpbeginner on Twitter.

To leave a comment please visit Which is the Best WordPress Slider? Performance + Quality Compared on WPBeginner.

How to Choose a Perfect Color Scheme for Your WordPress Site

Are you having a hard time deciding on your website’s color scheme? Choosing the right color combination not only increases your site’s visual appeal, but it can also generate favorable response from your visitors in terms of sales and conversions. In this article, we will… Read More »

To leave a comment please visit How to Choose a Perfect Color Scheme for Your WordPress Site on WPBeginner.

Are you having a hard time deciding on your website’s color scheme? Choosing the right color combination not only increases your site’s visual appeal, but it can also generate favorable response from your visitors in terms of sales and conversions. In this article, we will show you how to choose a perfect color scheme for your WordPress site by understanding the psychology of colors and using one of 4 amazing resources.

Choosing color scheme for your website

Psychology of Colors

It is a well researched theory that colors can affect human responses. Colors have an emotional pull on our decisions and choices we make in our everyday life.

Large corporations spend millions of dollars building a well crafted brand image and identity for their products. They hire experts to pick just the perfect combination of colors for their brands and products.

The colors you use on your site are part of your brand image. You need to choose colors that generate a favorable emotional response for your brand and products.

So how do you figure out which colors and what kind of response you are looking for?

Lucky for you, marketers and psychologists have done plenty of research already. Take a look at this infographic:

Emotional responses generated by different colors

  • Red: is the color of youth and joy. It reflects boldness and confidence.
  • Green: Creates a soothing calming effect, it evokes a peaceful, progressive, and calm emotional response.
  • Blue: It reflects trust, strength, reliability.
  • Black: Black generates a sophisticated, solid, secure emotional response.
  • White: Clarity and simplicity are the two major effects of White.
  • Yellow: Yellow is the color of optimism, warmth, friendliness.
  • Orange: Orange creates a fun, friendly, confidence, and cheerful effect.
  • Pink: Sensuality,femininity, romance, and love are the emotions associated with Pink.

Other Things to Consider

This goes without saying that colors need context to work the way you want them to work. Your brand or product may already have certain associations that may or may not work with the colors you are choosing.

Here are a few things you should consider before picking up a color scheme for your site:

First, you need to consider the existing brand image. If you already have a logo and other marketing materials, then you may want to use the existing colors.

You also need to consider which colors will look good on the web. Things that look great on print can look quite different on screen. Think about other media like sliders, videos, images, call to action buttons, etc that you will be adding to your site. Think about what colors you will be using the most.

Creating a Color Scheme

Hopefully, by now you have figured out the appropriate colors for your website with the psychology of colors in mind. We recommend you to choose at least two colors that articulately represent your brand, and the response you want to get from users.

Once you have those colors, there are several online tools that you can use to generate an unlimited number of color palettes.

1. Adobe Color CC

Adobe Color CC

Formerly known as Kuler, Adobe Color CC is a great tool to generate color palettes. You can select color rules, and then spin the wheel. You can manually adjust each color in the palette and rest of the colors will be automatically adjusted to match the color rule. You can also generate color palettes by uploading photos.

2. Photocopa by COLORLovers

Photocopa

Colorlovers is one of the most popular destinations for color inspiration and ideas. They have some great tools to generate color schemes. One of them is PhotoCopa which allows you to generate a color scheme from photos. You can also use their basic tool which generates colors combinations by simply selecting a color.

3. Material Palette

Material Palette Generator

Inspired by Google’s Material Design concept, Material Palette allows you to generate color schemes using the design rules. It is designed to inspire color schemes to be used in mobile apps but these color schemes can easily be used for websites as well.

4. Coolors.co

Coolors

Coolors is a wonderful color scheme generator. Simply hit the space bar to generate color schemes. You can modify a color in the scheme manually and lock it down. You can also download color schemes to use in your projects later.

We hope this article helped you choose the perfect color scheme for your WordPress site. You may want to look at our article on how to easily customize WordPress with CSS Hero.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

Infographic by The Logo Company

To leave a comment please visit How to Choose a Perfect Color Scheme for Your WordPress Site on WPBeginner.

Doing Terrible Things To Your Code

In 1992, I thought I was the best programmer in the world. In my defense, I had just graduated from college, this was pre-Internet, and I lived in Boulder, Colorado working in small business jobs where I was lucky to even hear about other programmers much less meet them.

I

In 1992, I thought I was the best programmer in the world. In my defense, I had just graduated from college, this was pre-Internet, and I lived in Boulder, Colorado working in small business jobs where I was lucky to even hear about other programmers much less meet them.

I eventually fell in with a guy named Bill O'Neil, who hired me to do contract programming. He formed a company with the regrettably generic name of Computer Research & Technologies, and we proceeded to work on various gigs together, building line of business CRUD apps in Visual Basic or FoxPro running on Windows 3.1 (and sometimes DOS, though we had a sense by then that this new-fangled GUI thing was here to stay).

Bill was the first professional programmer I had ever worked with. Heck, for that matter, he was the first programmer I ever worked with. He'd spec out some work with me, I'd build it in Visual Basic, and then I'd hand it over to him for review. He'd then calmly proceed to utterly demolish my code:

  • Tab order? Wrong.
  • Entering a number instead of a string? Crash.
  • Entering a date in the past? Crash.
  • Entering too many characters? Crash.
  • UI element alignment? Off.
  • Does it work with unusual characters in names like, say, O'Neil? Nope.

One thing that surprised me was that the code itself was rarely the problem. He occasionally had some comments about the way I wrote or structured the code, but what I clearly had no idea about is testing my code.

I dreaded handing my work over to him for inspection. I slowly, painfully learned that the truly difficult part of coding is dealing with the thousands of ways things can go wrong with your application at any given time – most of them user related.

That was my first experience with the buddy system, and thanks to Bill, I came out of that relationship with a deep respect for software craftsmanship. I have no idea what Bill is up to these days, but I tip my hat to him, wherever he is. I didn't always enjoy it, but learning to develop discipline around testing (and breaking) my own stuff unquestionably made me a better programmer.

It's tempting to lay all this responsibility at the feet of the mythical QA engineer.

If you are ever lucky enough to work with one, you should have a very, very healthy fear of professional testers. They are terrifying. Just scan this "Did I remember to test" list and you'll be having the worst kind of flashbacks in no time. Did I mention that's the abbreviated version of his list?

I believe a key turning point in every professional programmer's working life is when you realize you are your own worst enemy, and the only way to mitigate that threat is to embrace it. Act like your own worst enemy. Break your UI. Break your code. Do terrible things to your software.

This means programmers need a good working knowledge of at least the common mistakes, the frequent cases that average programmers tend to miss, to work against. You are tester zero. This is your responsibility.

Let's start with Patrick McKenzie's classic Falsehoods Programmers Believe about Names:

  1. People have exactly one canonical full name.
  2. People have exactly one full name which they go by.
  3. People have, at this point in time, exactly one canonical full name.
  4. People have, at this point in time, one full name which they go by.
  5. People have exactly N names, for any value of N.
  6. People’s names fit within a certain defined amount of space.
  7. People’s names do not change.
  8. People’s names change, but only at a certain enumerated set of events.
  9. People’s names are written in ASCII.
  10. People’s names are written in any single character set.

That's just the first 10. There are thirty more. Plus a lot in the comments if you're in the mood for extra credit. Or, how does Falsehoods Programmers Believe About Time grab you?

  1. There are always 24 hours in a day.
  2. Months have either 30 or 31 days.
  3. Years have 365 days.
  4. February is always 28 days long.
  5. Any 24-hour period will always begin and end in the same day (or week, or month).
  6. A week always begins and ends in the same month.
  7. A week (or a month) always begins and ends in the same year.
  8. The machine that a program runs on will always be in the GMT time zone.
  9. Ok, that’s not true. But at least the time zone in which a program has to run will never change.
  10. Well, surely there will never be a change to the time zone in which a program has to run in production.
  11. The system clock will always be set to the correct local time.
  12. The system clock will always be set to a time that is not wildly different from the correct local time.
  13. If the system clock is incorrect, it will at least always be off by a consistent number of seconds.
  14. The server clock and the client clock will always be set to the same time.
  15. The server clock and the client clock will always be set to around the same time.

Are there more? Of course there are! There's even a whole additional list of stuff he forgot when he put that giant list together.

Catastrophic Error - User attempted to use program in the manner program was meant to be used

I think you can see where this is going. This is programming. We do this stuff for fun, remember?

But in true made-for-TV fashion, wait, there's more! Seriously, guys, where are you going? Get back here. We have more awesome failure states to learn about:

At this point I wouldn't blame you if you decided to quit programming altogether. But I think it's better if we learn to do for each other what Bill did for me, twenty years ago — teach less experienced developers that a good programmer knows they have to do terrible things to their code. Do it because if you don't, I guarantee you other people will, and when they do, they will either walk away or create a support ticket. I'm not sure which is worse.

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How to Make the Most Out of WPBeginner’s Free Resources

Often new WPBeginner readers ask us how they can get the maximum benefits from all the free resources available on our website. WPBeginner is one of the largest free WordPress resource sites on the planet. We have been publishing free WordPress guides, how to tutorials,… Read More »

To leave a comment please visit How to Make the Most Out of WPBeginner’s Free Resources on WPBeginner.

Often new WPBeginner readers ask us how they can get the maximum benefits from all the free resources available on our website. WPBeginner is one of the largest free WordPress resource sites on the planet. We have been publishing free WordPress guides, how to tutorials, and videos since 2009. In this article, we will show you how to make the most out of WPBeginner’s free resources.

WPBeginner Logo

1. Subscribe to WPBeginner Newsletter

Subscribe to WPBeginner newsletter

Signing up for our newsletter is the best way to stay updated with WPBeginner’s new posts and resources. When we write a new article, it will land directly in your email inbox. You can select the email frequency such as WPB Daily or WPB Weekly.

You can also select the sections you want to subscribe to. We recommend you to check all the boxes to get the maximum benefit.

2. Signup for Our FREE Video Tutorials

WPBeginner Videos - Free WordPress tutorials for beginners

If you are just starting out with WordPress, then our WordPress Beginners Videos should be your first destination. We hate to see many big companies selling such basic education for hundreds of dollars. This is why we decided to make it available for Free.

These HD quality videos are prepared by our experts and are built for beginner level users. Our 23-step easy to follow video tutorials cover from the basics to advance WordPress topics and will help you get started with WordPress in no time.

3. Join our YouTube Channel

WPBeginner videos on YouTube

With nearly 20,000 subscribers, WPBeginner’s YouTube channel is the best WordPress channel on YouTube.

We regularly upload new videos with useful how to articles aimed at beginner level users. These videos are short, sweet, and easy to follow. You will also get the video transcript, a text version of the tutorial, and you can even ask questions in the comments.

Joining our YouTube channel, will help you stay up to date, brush up your WordPress skills, and discover new tools and plugins for your website.

4. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Follow WPBeginner on Facebook and Twitter

You can also follow us on Twitter and Facebook. This way you can participate in our community discussions, see what new posts we have published, get in touch with us, and leave your comments and feedback.

We like to hear from our users. In fact, many of our post ideas come from user requests made on Twitter.

5. Got a WordPress Question? Here is How to Find The Answer

Search WPBeginner to find your WordPress answers

At the top right corner of every page on WPBeginner, there is a search box. This search box is powered by Google Custom Search. It is fast and highly accurate.

Simply type the question you wanted to ask us. There is a very good chance that we have already written about it.

6. Can’t Find an Answer? Drop us a Line or Tweet to us

If you have searched WPBeginner and didn’t find an answer to your question, then you can reach us using the contact form on our website.

You can also tweet to us @WPBeginner. We try our best to get back to you with an answer or point you in the right direction within 1 business day.

We love hearing from our users because that’s what keeps us motivated and inspired.

7. Need Plugin and Theme Recommendations?

Many beginners are concerned about which plugins they should use on their WordPress site or how to find the perfect theme. Visit WPBeginner’s Showcase section where we hand-pick the best WordPress plugins and themes. Here are some places to look at:

Want to know which WordPress plugins and tools we use on WPBeginner? Check out WPBeginner’s Blueprint where you will find all the tools and plugins we use to run WPBeginner.

8. Hidden Gems

Hidden Gems

Over the years we have built quite a few awesome resources. The two that you should absolutely check out are our WordPress dictionary and WordPress deals.

WPBeginner glossary is the best place for beginners to start and familiarize themselves with the WordPress lingo. In other words, we help you translate the WordPress gibberish that you may come across.

WPBeginner Deals is the best place to find exclusive discounts on WordPress products and services. Because we have such an awesome community, a lot of WordPress businesses have decided to offer our users exclusive discounts.

So the next time you decide to buy a premium WordPress plugin, theme, or another service, then it’s probably best to search our deals area. You may save 10 – 60% off.

9. Want to Learn More About WPBeginner?

Learn more about WPBeginner

Are you curious about who runs WPBeginner? Why it’s free and how it works? Check out our about page. We started out as a small blog to help our clients learn how to use WordPress. Since then we have grown and become one of the most popular destinations on the web for WordPress related resources.

You may also want to check out the personal website of our founder and CEO, Syed Balkhi. You can find him on Twitter as well.

10. What Else We Do?

WPBeginner is a project of Awesome Motive Inc. Our parent company runs hugely popular websites like List25.

We also sell some of the most successful WordPress related products such as Soliloquy, Envira Gallery, and ThemeLab.

One of our premier products is OptinMonster, the best lead generation solution on the web.

We hope this article helped you learn how you can make the most out of WPBeginner’s free WordPress resources. You may also want to take a look at how to learn WordPress in a week or less.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

To leave a comment please visit How to Make the Most Out of WPBeginner’s Free Resources on WPBeginner.

How to Add Email Subscriptions for Your WordPress Blog

Do you want to add email subscription to your WordPress blog? Recently, one of our users asked us what is the best way to subscribe by email option in WordPress? In this article, we will show you how to add email subscriptions to your WordPress… Read More »

To leave a comment please visit How to Add Email Subscriptions for Your WordPress Blog on WPBeginner.

Do you want to add email subscription to your WordPress blog? Recently, one of our users asked us what is the best way to subscribe by email option in WordPress? In this article, we will show you how to add email subscriptions to your WordPress blog and start building your email list.

WordPress Email Subscription

Why You Should Add Subscribe via Email Option to Your Site?

While social media is a great way to interact with your readers, email is the most reliable and direct way of communication. By offering email subscription on your blog, you can build a steady stream of regular visitors for your site.

Email subscription also gives your users yet another way to consume your content as some folks may not be on social media. See our complete guide on why you should start building your email list right away.

Often beginners think that adding email subscription is some complicated process. That’s not true at all.

The WordPress RSS to email subscription setup is quite straight forward, and it will take you less than 30 minutes. Once you set it up, your readers will automatically get daily or weekly emails containing your new content.

Now since there are multiple services and plugins that allow you to setup email subscriptions in WordPress, we will only cover the top 3 email subscription plugins and services.

MailChimp RSS to Email

MailChimp is one of the most popular email marketing service providers. It is a paid service, but they do offer a free option for those with less than 2000 subscribers.

To quickly get started with MailChimp see our guide on using MailChimp and WordPress.

For the sake of this article, we are assuming that you have signed up for MailChimp and created your first email list. The next step is to setup an RSS to Email campaign.

Simply visit Campaigns » Create Campaign to create a new campaign.

Creating a new MailChimp Campaign

MailChimp will now show you different types of campaigns that you can create. You need to click on the RSS Driven Campaign option.

Creating RSS to email campaign in MailChimp

This will bring you to the campaign settings page where you need to provide your WordPress site’s RSS feed link. Your feed URL is yoursite.com/feed/

You will also need to choose the time and frequency of emails. You can choose to send daily, weekly, or monthly emails.

RSS to email settings

On the next page, you will have to provide campaign info. You will notice that MailChimp has already pre-filled most fields on the page. These settings should work for most blogs, but feel free to change them as needed.

Changing RSS to email campaign info

Now you need to click on the next button to select a template for your emails. MailChimp allows you to customize the template by adding your own logo, by-line, and any other elements that you may want to add.

Design your RSS to email template

When you are finished customizing, click on the next button and then click on Save and Exit.

That’s all, you have successfully created your WordPress RSS to Email newsletter using MailChimp.

To add the email subscription form to your website, simply visit the Lists page on your MailChimp account and click on the downward arrow icon next to your email list. After that select signup forms from the menu.

Creating MailChimp email signup form

MailChimp will then ask you, what kind of signup form you want to create. Select Embedded Forms.

On the next screen, you can customize your email sign up form and generate the embed code. You can then copy and paste this code in a text widget on your WordPress website.

Alternatively, you can use OptinMonster a plugin created by the WPBeginner team that will make this process a lot easier and offer you pretty signup forms, floating bars, slide-ins, exit-intent popups, and more.

Aweber RSS to Email

Aweber is another popular email marketing service provider. It’s a paid service, but they offer a 30 day free trial. A lot of bloggers and internet marketers prefer to use AWeber.

If you are just joining Aweber, then you will be directed to create your first email list when you login for the first time.

Once you are logged into your Aweber dashboard, simply visit Messages » Blog Broadcasts.

Creating blog broadcasts - RSS to email subscription in Aweber for WordPress

On the next screen, click on the green button labeled ‘Create a Blog Broadcast’.

Create a blog broadcast

This will bring you to the new page where you can setup your RSS to email campaign. First you need to enter the URL of your blog’s RSS feed. After that you need to provide a subject line for the emails.

Aweber RSS to email settings

Scroll down a little, and you can choose a template for your email. Select the one you like and then click on load template.

Choosing a template for your email

After choosing your template, scroll further down to configure time and frequency of emails. You can setup to send an email as soon as new item appears in your RSS feed. You can also send daily, weekly, or even monthly email digests.

Set email timings and frequency in Aweber

Once you are done setting up these options, you need to click on Save Blog Broadcast button.

That’s all, you have successfully set up Aweber RSS to email subscription.

If you have not already added the email signup form to your WordPress site, then the next step is to add a signup form to your WordPress sidebar. Simply click on the ‘Signup Forms’ in the Aweber dashboard to design your email signup form.

Creating Aweber Email Signup form

Follow the on screen instructions and save your form. Finally you will reach the publish section. There you need to click on the ‘I will install my form’ button and copy the form embed code.

Copy the email signup form code for your WordPress site

Now go to Appearance » Widgets on your WordPress site and paste this code in a text widget.

Alternatively, you can use OptinMonster a plugin created by the WPBeginner team that will make this process a lot easier and offer you pretty signup forms, floating bars, slide-ins, exit-intent popups, and more.

Using JetPack Subscriptions

JetPack is another option for users who want to add email subscriptions to their WordPress site. It is completely free, but the downside is that you don’t control your list.

JetPack Subscriptions is not a full newsletter. For example, if you wanted to send an email apart from your daily blog posts, then you will not be able to do that using JetPack Subscriptions. Also, if later you decide to move to a proper email marketing service which most bloggers do, then your users will have to opt-in to the email list again.

Having said that, here is how to add JetPack email subscriptions to your self hosted WordPress site. First thing you need to do is install and activate the JetPack plugin. Upon activation, the plugin will add a new menu item labeled JetPack to your WordPress admin bar. Clicking on it will take you to the plugin’s settings page.

JetPack requires you to link your site to WordPress.com

JetPack plugin requires you to create a WordPress.com account and link your site with it (See our guide on the difference between WordPress.com and self-hosted WordPress.org sites). If you have a WordPress.com account, then you can use that or you can create a free account.

Once you have connected JetPack to WordPress.com, you need to visit Appearance » Widgets. Drag and drop Blog Subscriptions (JetPack) widget to a sidebar and then click on Save button store your widget settings.

You can also enable subscription option below your comment form. Visit Settings » Discussion page and scroll down to the JetPack subscription section. Check the box next to blog subspcription and comment subscription options. Click on the save changes button to store your settings.

Adding subscription options in comment form

That’s all you have successfully set up JetPack email subscriptions on your WordPress site. If you ever want to move to another email service, here is how to switch from JetPack subscriptions to MailChimp, Aweber, etc.

We hope this article helped you add email subscription to your WordPress blog. You may also want to check out how we increased our email subscribers by 600% using OptinMonster.

While there are dozens of other plugins and services that allow you to setup email subscriptions for your WordPress blog, above are the ones that we recommend. For those who are wondering, we use MailChimp and OptinMonster to handle WPBeginner email subscriptions. Here’s a tutorial on how to create a daily and weekly email newsletter in WordPress similar to WPBeginner.

We hope this article helped you learn how to properly add email subscriptions to your WordPress blog. You may also want to check out our email marketing 101 guide to kickstart your email list.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

To leave a comment please visit How to Add Email Subscriptions for Your WordPress Blog on WPBeginner.