Docker and Linux Containers on Windows, with or without Hyper-V Virtual Machines

Containers are lovely, in case you haven’t heard. They are a nice and clean way to get a reliable and guaranteed deployment, no matter the host system. If I want to run my my ASP.NET Core application, I can just type “docker run -p 5000:80 shanselman/…

Containers are lovely, in case you haven't heard. They are a nice and clean way to get a reliable and guaranteed deployment, no matter the host system.

If I want to run my my ASP.NET Core application, I can just type "docker run -p 5000:80 shanselman/demos" at the command line, and it'll start up! I don't have any concerns that it won't run. It'll run, and run well.

Some containers naysayers say , sure, we could do the same thing with Virtual Machines, but even today, a VHD (virtual hard drive) is rather an unruly thing and includes a ton of overhead that a container doesn't have. Containers are happening and you should be looking hard at them for your deployments.

docker run shanselman/demos

Historically on Windows, however, Linux Containers run inside a Hyper-V virtual machine. This can be a good thing or a bad thing, depending on what your goals are. Running Containers inside a VM gives you significant isolation with some overhead. This is nice for Servers but less so for my laptop. Docker for Windows hides the VM for the most part, but it's there. Your Container runs inside a Linux VM that runs within Hyper-V on Windows proper.

HyperV on Windows

With the latest version of Windows 10 (or 10 Server) and the beta of Docker for Windows, there's native Linux Container support on Windows. That means there's no Virtual Machine or Hyper-V involved (unless you want), so Linux Containers run on Windows itself using Windows 10's built in container support.

For now you have to switch "modes" between Hyper V and native Containers, and you can't (yet) run Linux and Windows Containers side by side. The word on the street is that this is just a point in time thing, and that Docker will at some point support running Linux and Windows Containers in parallel. That's pretty sweet because it opens up all kinds of cool hybrid scenarios. I could run a Windows Server container with an .NET Framework ASP.NET app that talks to a Linux Container running Redis or Postgres. I could then put them all up into Kubernetes in Azure, for example.

Once I've turned Linux Containers on Windows on within Docker, everything just works and has one less moving part.

Linux Containers on Docker

I can easily and quickly run busybox or real Ubuntu (although Windows 10 already supports Ubuntu natively with WSL):

docker run -ti busybox sh

More useful even is to run the Azure Command Line with no install! Just "docker run -it microsoft/azure-cli" and it's running in a Linux Container.

Azure CLI in a Container

I can even run nyancat! (Thanks Thomas!)

docker run -it supertest2014/nyan

nyancat!

Speculating - I look forward to the day I can run "minikube start --vm-driver="windows" (or something) and easily set up a Kubernetes development system locally using Windows native Linux Container support rather than using Hyper-V Virtual Machines, if I choose to.


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© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Recovering from the Windows 10 Insiders Fast 17017 volsnap.sys reboot GSOD/BSOD

NOTE: I’m not involved with the Windows Team or the Windows Insider Program. This blog is my own and written as a user of Windows. I have no inside information. I will happily correct this blog post if it’s incorrect. Remember, don’t just do stuff to y…

NOTE: I'm not involved with the Windows Team or the Windows Insider Program. This blog is my own and written as a user of Windows. I have no inside information. I will happily correct this blog post if it's incorrect. Remember, don't just do stuff to your computer because you read it on a random blog. Think first, backup always, then do stuff.

Beta testing is always risky. The Windows Insiders Program lets you run regular early builds of Windows 10. There's multiple "rings" like Slow and Fast - depending on your risk tolerance, and bandwidth. I run Fast and maybe twice a year there's something bad-ish that happens like a bad video driver or a app that doesn't work, but it's usually fixed within a week. It's the price I pay for happily testing new stuff. There's the Slow ring which is more stable and updates like once a month vs once a week. That ring is more "baked."

This last week, as I understand it, a nasty bug made it out to Fast for some number of people (not everyone but enough that it sucked) myself included.

I don't reboot my Surface Book much, maybe twice a month, but I did yesterday while preparing for the DevIntersection conference and suddenly my main machine was stuck in a "Repairing Windows" reboot loop. It wouldn't start, wouldn't repair. I was FREAKING out. Other people I've seen report a Green Screen of Death (GSOD/BSOD) loop with an error in volsnap.sys.

TO FIX IT

The goal is to get rid of the bad volsnap from Windows 10 Insiders build version 17017 and replace that one file with a non-broken version from a previous build. That's your goal. There's a few ways to do this, so you need to put some thought into how you want to do it.

NOTE: At the time of this writing, Fast Build 17025 is rolling out and fixes this, so if you can take that build you're cool, and no worries. Do it.

volsnap.sys was a problem with 17017

1. Can you boot Windows 10 off something else? USB/DVD?

Can you boot off something else like another version Windows 10 USB key or a DVD? Boot off your recovery media as if you're re-installing Windows 10 BUT DO NOT CLICK INSTALL.

When you've run Windows 10 Setup, instead click Repair, then Troubleshoot, then Command Prompt. It's especially important to get to the Command Prompt this way rather than pressing Shift-10 as you enter setup, because this path will allow you to unlock your possibly BitLockered C: drive.

NOTE: If your boot drive is bitlockered you'll need to go to https://onedrive.live.com/RecoveryKey on another machine or your phone and find your computer's Recovery Key. You'll enter this as you press Troubleshoot and it will allow you to access your now-unencrypted drive from the command prompt.

At this point all your drive letters may be weird. Take a moment and look around. Your USB key may be X: or Z:. Your C: drive may be D: or E:.

2. Do you have an earlier version of volsnap.sys? Find it.

If you've been taking Windows Insiders Builds/Flights, you may have a C:\Windows.old folder. Remembering to be conscious of your drive letters, you want to rename the bad volsnap and copy in the old one from elsewhere. In this example, I get it from C:\Windows.old.

ren C:\windows\system32\drivers\volsnap.sys C:\windows\system32\drivers\volsnap.sys.bak

copy C:\windows.old\windows\system32\drivers\volsnap.sys C:\windows\system32\drivers\volsnap.sys

Unfortunately, *I* didn't have a C:\windows.old folder as I used Disk Cleanup to get more space. I found a good volsnap.sys from another machine in my house and copied it to the root of the USB key I booted off up. In that case my copy command was different as I copied from my USB key to c:\windows\system32\drivers, but the GOAL was the same - get a good volsnap.sys.

Once I resolved my boot issue, I went to Windows Update and am now updating to 17025.

PLEASE, friends - BACK UP YOUR STUFF. Remember the Backup Rule of Three.

Here's the rule of three. It's a long time computer-person rule of thumb that you can apply to your life now. It's also called the Backup 3-2-1 rule.

  • 3 copies of anything you care about - Two isn't enough if it's important.
  • 2 different formats - Example: Dropbox+DVDs or Hard Drive+Memory Stick or CD+Crash Plan, or more
  • 1 off-site backup - If the house burns down, how will you get your memories back?

Beta testing will cost you some time, and system crashes happen. But are they a nightmare data loss scenario or are they an irritant. For me this was a scary "can't boot" scenario, but I had another machine and my stuff was backed up.

Don't take beta builds of anything on your primary machine that you care about and that makes you money.

DISCLAIMER: I love you but this blog post has NO warranty. I have no idea what I'm doing and if this makes your non-bootable beta software machine even worse, that's on you, Dear Reader.


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Use a second laptop as an extended monitor with Windows 10 wireless displays

James Clarke from the Windows team rolled into a meeting today with two Surfaces…but one had no keyboard. Then, without any ceremony, he proceeded to do this: Now, I consider myself a bit of a Windows Productivity Tips Gourmand, and while I was awar…

James Clarke from the Windows team rolled into a meeting today with two Surfaces...but one had no keyboard. Then, without any ceremony, he proceeded to do this:

Holy Crap a Surface as a Second Monitor

Now, I consider myself a bit of a Windows Productivity Tips Gourmand, and while I was aware of Miracast and the general idea of a Wireless Display, I didn't realize that it worked this well and that it was built into Windows 10.

In fact, I'm literally sitting here in a hotel with a separate USB3 LCD display panel to use as a second monitor. I've also used Duet Display and used my iPad Pro as a second monitor.

I usually travel with a main laptop and a backup laptop anyway. Why do I lug this extra LCD around? Madness. I had this functionality all the time, built in.

Use your second laptop as a second monitor

On the machine you want to use as a second monitor, head over to Settings | System | Projecting to this PC and set it up as you like, considering convenience vs. security.

Settings | Projecting to this PC

Then, from your main machine - the one you are projecting from - just hit Windows Key+P, like you were projecting to a projector or second display. At the bottom, hit Connect to a Wireless Display.

Connect to a Wireless Display

Then wait a bit as it scans around for your PC. You can extend or duplicate...just like another monitor...

Connected to a Wireless Display

...because Windows thinks it IS another monitor.

You can also do this with Miracast TVs like my LG, or your Roku or sometimes Amazon Fires, or you can get a Microsoft Wireless Display Adapter and HDMI to any monitor - even ones at hotels!

NOTE: It's not super fast. It's sometimes pixelly and sometimes slow, depending on what's going on around you. But I just moved Chrome over onto my other machine and watched a YouTube video, just fine. I wouldn't play a game on it, but browsing, dev, typing, coding, works just fine!

Get ready for this. You can ALSO use the second machine as a second collaboration point! That means that someone else could PAIR with you and also type and move their mouse. THIS makes pair programming VERY interesting.

 Allow input from the remote display

Here's a video of it in action:

Give it a try and let me know how it goes. I used two Surfaces, but I also have extended my display to a 3 year old Lenovo without issues.


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© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Ubuntu now in the Windows Store: Updates to Linux on Windows 10 and Important Tips

I noticed this blog post about Ubuntu over at the Microsoft Command Line blog. Ubuntu is now available from the Windows Store for builds of Windows over 16215.

image

You can run “Winver” to see your build number of Windows. If you run Windows 10 you can certainly sign up for the Windows Insiders builds, or you can wait a few months until these features make their way to the mainstream. I’ve been running Windows 10 Insiders “Fast ring” for a while with a few issues but nothing blocking.

The addition of Ubuntu to the Windows Store may initially seem confusing or even a little bizarre. However, given a minute to understand the larger architecture it make a lot of sense. However, for those of us who have been beta-testing these features, the move to the Windows Store will require some manual steps in order for you to reap the benefits.

Here’s how I see it.

  • For the early betas of the Windows Subsystem for Linux you type bash from anywhere and it runs Ubuntu on Windows.
  • Ubuntu on Windows hides its filesystem in C:\Users\scott\AppData\Local\somethingetcetc and you shouldn’t go there or touch it.
  • By moving the tar files and Linux distro installation into the store, that allows us users to use the Store’s CDN (Content Distrubution Network) to get Distros quickly and easily. 
    • Just turn on the feature and REBOOT
      Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName Microsoft-Windows-Subsystem-Linux

then hit the store to get the binaries!

Ok, now this is where and why it gets interesting.

Soon (later this month I’m told) we will be able to have n number of native Linux distros on our Windows 10 machines at one time. You can install as many as you like from the store. No VMs, just fast Linux…on Windows!

There is a utility for the Windows Subsystem for Linux called “wslconfig” that Windows 10 has.

C:\>wslconfig
Performs administrative operations on Windows Subsystem for Linux

Usage:
/l, /list [/all] - Lists registered distributions.
/all - Optionally list all distributions, including distributions that
are currently being installed or uninstalled.
/s, /setdefault <DistributionName> - Sets the specified distribution as the default.
/u, /unregister <DistributionName> - Unregisters a distribution.

C:\WINDOWS\system32>wslconfig /l
Windows Subsystem for Linux Distributions:
Ubuntu (Default) Fedora
OpenSUSE

At this point when I type “bash” at the regular Windows command prompt or PowerShell I will be launching my default Linux. I can also just type “Ubuntu” or “Fedora,” etc to get a specific one.

If I wanted to test my Linux code (.NET, node, go, ruby, whatever) I could script it from Windows and run my tests on n number of distros. Slick for developers.

TODOs if you have WSL and Bash from earlier betas

If you already have “bash” on your Windows 10 machine and want to move to the “many distros” you’ll just install the Ubuntu distro from the store and then move your distro customizations out of the “legacy/beta bash” over to the “new train but beta although getting closer to release WSL.” I copied my ~/ folder over to /mnt/c/Users/Scott/Desktop/WSLBackup, then opened Ubuntu and copied my .rc files and whatnot back in. Then I removed my original bash with lxrun /uninstall. Once I’ve done that, my distro are managed by the store and I can have as many as I like. Other than customizations, it’s really easy (like, it’s not a big deal and it’s fast) to add or remove Linuxes on Windows 10 so fear not. Backup your stuff and this will be a 10 min operation, plus whatever apt-get installs you need to redo. Everything else is the same and you’ll still want to continue storing and sharing files via /mnt/c.

NOTE: I did a YouTube video called Editing code and files on Windows Subsystem for Linux on Windows 10 that I’d love if you checked out and shared on social media!

Enjoy!


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© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

I noticed this blog post about Ubuntu over at the Microsoft Command Line blog. Ubuntu is now available from the Windows Store for builds of Windows over 16215.

image

You can run "Winver" to see your build number of Windows. If you run Windows 10 you can certainly sign up for the Windows Insiders builds, or you can wait a few months until these features make their way to the mainstream. I've been running Windows 10 Insiders "Fast ring" for a while with a few issues but nothing blocking.

The addition of Ubuntu to the Windows Store may initially seem confusing or even a little bizarre. However, given a minute to understand the larger architecture it make a lot of sense. However, for those of us who have been beta-testing these features, the move to the Windows Store will require some manual steps in order for you to reap the benefits.

Here's how I see it.

  • For the early betas of the Windows Subsystem for Linux you type bash from anywhere and it runs Ubuntu on Windows.
  • Ubuntu on Windows hides its filesystem in C:\Users\scott\AppData\Local\somethingetcetc and you shouldn't go there or touch it.
  • By moving the tar files and Linux distro installation into the store, that allows us users to use the Store's CDN (Content Distrubution Network) to get Distros quickly and easily. 
    • Just turn on the feature and REBOOT
      Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName Microsoft-Windows-Subsystem-Linux

then hit the store to get the binaries!

Ok, now this is where and why it gets interesting.

Soon (later this month I'm told) we will be able to have n number of native Linux distros on our Windows 10 machines at one time. You can install as many as you like from the store. No VMs, just fast Linux...on Windows!

There is a utility for the Windows Subsystem for Linux called "wslconfig" that Windows 10 has.

C:\>wslconfig

Performs administrative operations on Windows Subsystem for Linux

Usage:
/l, /list [/all] - Lists registered distributions.
/all - Optionally list all distributions, including distributions that
are currently being installed or uninstalled.
/s, /setdefault <DistributionName> - Sets the specified distribution as the default.
/u, /unregister <DistributionName> - Unregisters a distribution.

C:\WINDOWS\system32>wslconfig /l
Windows Subsystem for Linux Distributions:
Ubuntu (Default) Fedora
OpenSUSE

At this point when I type "bash" at the regular Windows command prompt or PowerShell I will be launching my default Linux. I can also just type "Ubuntu" or "Fedora," etc to get a specific one.

If I wanted to test my Linux code (.NET, node, go, ruby, whatever) I could script it from Windows and run my tests on n number of distros. Slick for developers.

TODOs if you have WSL and Bash from earlier betas

If you already have "bash" on your Windows 10 machine and want to move to the "many distros" you'll just install the Ubuntu distro from the store and then move your distro customizations out of the "legacy/beta bash" over to the "new train but beta although getting closer to release WSL." I copied my ~/ folder over to /mnt/c/Users/Scott/Desktop/WSLBackup, then opened Ubuntu and copied my .rc files and whatnot back in. Then I removed my original bash with lxrun /uninstall. Once I've done that, my distro are managed by the store and I can have as many as I like. Other than customizations, it's really easy (like, it's not a big deal and it's fast) to add or remove Linuxes on Windows 10 so fear not. Backup your stuff and this will be a 10 min operation, plus whatever apt-get installs you need to redo. Everything else is the same and you'll still want to continue storing and sharing files via /mnt/c.

NOTE: I did a YouTube video called Editing code and files on Windows Subsystem for Linux on Windows 10 that I'd love if you checked out and shared on social media!

Enjoy!


Sponsor: Seq is simple centralized logging, on your infrastructure, with great support for ASP.NET Core and Serilog. Version 4 adds integrated dashboards and alerts - check it out!



© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Audit and Optimize your Windows 10 Search Indexing Options

I was getting frustrated with the speed (or lack of) of Windows Search within Windows 10 lately. I went over to my Indexing Options – just hit Start and type Indexing Options – and was surprised to see that there was over 1.5 MILLLION items indexed! That seems like a big number. Why so large?

I checked my “index these locations” list and didn’t see anything weird, but I did note that Indexing does include c:\users\YOURNAME by default. That seems reasonable, because it is reasonable.

However, I also noted that I had a LOT of “.folders” (dot folders) under my C:\users\YOURNAME folder adding up to a few gigs of config text files, caches and general crap.

I was able to significantly lower the number of items indexed from over a million to a reasonable 215k items just by excluding (un-checking) folders that I knew didn’t matter to me as much.

Go to Indexing Options and click Modify:

Indexing Options

Go to your C drive (or wherever ~\YOURNAME is) and go to your top level User folder. I unchecked a bunch of the stuff that didn’t matter to me.

Indexing Location

For average users this won’t matter, but for developers who install a bunch of utilities, have their Dropbox or OneDrive in the c:\users folder, a 5 min audit of your indexed files can give your Indexed Files a nice refresh.


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© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

I was getting frustrated with the speed (or lack of) of Windows Search within Windows 10 lately. I went over to my Indexing Options - just hit Start and type Indexing Options - and was surprised to see that there was over 1.5 MILLLION items indexed! That seems like a big number. Why so large?

I checked my "index these locations" list and didn't see anything weird, but I did note that Indexing does include c:\users\YOURNAME by default. That seems reasonable, because it is reasonable.

However, I also noted that I had a LOT of ".folders" (dot folders) under my C:\users\YOURNAME folder adding up to a few gigs of config text files, caches and general crap.

I was able to significantly lower the number of items indexed from over a million to a reasonable 215k items just by excluding (un-checking) folders that I knew didn't matter to me as much.

Go to Indexing Options and click Modify:

Indexing Options

Go to your C drive (or wherever ~\YOURNAME is) and go to your top level User folder. I unchecked a bunch of the stuff that didn't matter to me.

Indexing Location

For average users this won't matter, but for developers who install a bunch of utilities, have their Dropbox or OneDrive in the c:\users folder, a 5 min audit of your indexed files can give your Indexed Files a nice refresh.


Sponsor: Check out JetBrains Rider: a new cross-platform .NET IDE. Edit, refactor, test, build and debug ASP.NET, .NET Framework, .NET Core, or Unity applications. Learn more and get access to early builds!


© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Setting up a Shiny Development Environment within Linux on Windows 10

While I was getting Ruby on Rails to work nicely under Ubuntu on Windows 10 I took the opportunity to set up my *nix bash environment, which was largely using defaults. Yes, I know I can use zsh or fish or other shells. Yes, I know I can use emacs and screen, but I am using Vim and tmux. Fight me. Anyway, once my post was done, I starting messing around with open source .NET Core on Linux (it runs on Windows, Mac, and Linux, but here I’m running on Linux on Windows. #Inception) and tweeted a pic of my desktop.

By the way, I feel totally vindicated by all the interest in “text mode” given my 2004 blog post “Windows is completely missing the TextMode boat.” ;)’

Also, for those of you who are DEEPLY NOT INTERESTED in the command line, that’s cool. You can stop reading now. Totally OK. I also use Visual Studio AND Visual Studio Code. Sometimes I click and mouse and sometimes I tap and type. There is room for us all.

WHAT IS ALL THIS LINUX ON WINDOWS STUFF? Here’s a FAQ on the Bash/Windows Subsystem for Linux/Ubuntu on Windows/Snowball in Hell and some detailed Release Notes. Yes, it’s real, and it’s spectacular. Can’t read that much text? Here’s a video I did on Ubuntu on Windows 10.

A number of people asked me how they could set up their WSL (Windows Subsystem for Linux) installs to be something like this, so here’s what I did. Note that will I’ve been using *nix on and off for 20+ years, I am by no means an expert. I am, and have been, Permanently Intermediate in my skills. I do not dream in RegEx, and I am offended that others can bust out an awk script without googling.

C9RT5_bUwAALJ-H

So there’s a few things going on in this screenshot.

  • Running .NET Core on Linux (on Windows 10)
  • Cool VIM theme with >256 colors
  • Norton Midnight Commander in the corner (thanks Miguel)
  • Desqview-esque tmux splitter (with mouse support)
  • Some hotkey remapping, git prompt, completion
  • Ubuntu Mono font
  • Nice directory colors (DIRCOLORS/LS_COLORS)

Let’s break them down one at a time. And, again, your mileage may vary, no warranty express or implied, any of this may destroy your world, you read this on a blog. Linux is infinitely configurable and the only constant is that my configuration rocks and yours sucks. Until I see something in yours that I can steal.

Running .NET Core on Linux (on Windows 10)

Since Linux on Windows 10 is (today) Ubuntu, you can install .NET Core within it just like any Linux. Here’s the Ubuntu instructions for .NET Core’s SDK. You may have Ubuntu 14.04 or 16.04 (you can upgrade your Linux on Windows if you like). Make sure you know what you’re running by doing a:

~ $ lsb_release -a
No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID: Ubuntu
Description: Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS
Release: 16.04
Codename: xenial
~ $

If you’re not on 16.04 you can easily remove and reinstall the whole subsystem with these commands at cmd.exe (note the /full is serious and torches the Linux filesystem):

> lxrun /uninstall /full
> lxrun /install

Or if you want you can run this within bash (will take longer but maintain settings):

sudo do-release-upgrade

Know what Ubuntu your Windows 10 has when you install .NET Core within it. The other thing to remember is that now you have two .NET Cores, one Windows and one Ubuntu, on the same (kinda) machine. Since the file systems are separated it’s not a big deal. I do my development work within Ubuntu on /mnt/d/github (which is a Windows drive). It’s OK for the Linux subsystem to edit files in Linux or Windows, but don’t “reach into” the Linux file system from Windows.

Cool Vim theme with >256 colors

That Vim theme is gruvbox and I installed it like this. Thanks to Rich Turner for turning me on to this theme.

$ cd ~/
$ mkdir .vim
$ cd .vim
$ mkdir colors
$ cd colors
$ curl -O https://raw.githubusercontent.com/morhetz/gruvbox/master/colors/gruvbox.vim
$ cd ~/
$ vim .vimrc

Paste the following (hit ‘i’ for insert and then right click/paste)

set number
syntax enable
set background=dark
colorscheme gruvbox
set mouse=a

if &term =~ '256color'
" disable Background Color Erase (BCE) so that color schemes
" render properly when inside 256-color tmux and GNU screen.
" see also http://snk.tuxfamily.org/log/vim-256color-bce.html
set t_ut=
endif

Then save and exit with Esc, :wq (write and quit). There’s a ton of themes out there, so try some for yourself!

Norton Midnight Commander in the corner (thanks Miguel)

Midnight Commander is a wonderful Norton Commander clone that Miguel de Icaza started, that’s licensed as part of GNU. I installed it via apt, as I would any Ubuntu software.

$ sudo apt-get install mc

There’s mouse support within the Windows conhost (console host) that bash runs within, so you’ll even get mouse support within Midnight Commander!

Midnight Commander

Great stuff.

Desqview-esque tmux splitter (with mouse support)

Tmux is a terminal multiplexer. It’s a text-mode windowing environment within which you can run multiple programs. Even better, you can “detach” from a running session and reattached from elsewhere. Because of this, folks love using tmux on servers where they can ssh in, set up an environment, detach, and reattach from elsewhere.

NOTE: The Windows Subsystem for Linux shuts down all background processes when the last console exits. So you can detach and attach tmux sessions happily, but just make sure you don’t close every console on your machine.

Here’s a nice animated gif of me moving the splitter on tmux on Windows. YES I KNOW YOU CAN USE THE KEYBOARD BUT THIS GIF IS COOL.

Some hotkey remapping, git prompt, completion

I am still learning tmux but here’s my .tmux.conf. I’ve made a few common changes to make the hotkey creation of windows easier.

#remap prefix from 'C-b' to 'C-a'
unbind C-b
set-option -g prefix C-a
bind-key C-a send-prefix

# split panes using | and -
bind | split-window -h
bind _ split-window -v
unbind '"'
unbind %
bind k confirm kill-window
bind K confirm kill-server
bind < resize-pane -L 1
bind > resize-pane -R 1
bind - resize-pane -D 1
bind + resize-pane -U 1
bind r source-file ~/.tmux.conf

# switch panes using Alt-arrow without prefix
bind -n M-Left select-pane -L
bind -n M-Right select-pane -R
bind -n M-Up select-pane -U
bind -n M-Down select-pane -D

# Enable mouse control (clickable windows, panes, resizable panes)
set -g mouse on
set -g default-terminal "screen-256color"

I’m using the default Ubuntu .bashrc that includes a check for dircolors (more on this below) but I added this for git-completion.sh and a git prompt, as well as these two alias. I like being able to type “desktop” to jump to my Windows Desktop. And the -x on Midnight Commander helps the mouse support.

alias desktop="cd /mnt/c/Users/scott/Desktop"
alias mc="mc -x"
export CLICOLOR=1
source ~/.git-completion.sh
PS1='\[\033[37m\]\W\[\033[0m\]$(__git_ps1 " (\[\033[35m\]%s\[\033[0m\])") \$ '
GIT_PS1_SHOWDIRTYSTATE=1
GIT_PS1_SHOWSTASHSTATE=1
GIT_PS1_SHOWUNTRACKEDFILES=1
GIT_PS1_SHOWUPSTREAM="auto"

Git Completion can be installed with:

sudo apt-get install git bash-completion

Ubuntu Mono font

I really like the Ubuntu Mono font, and I like the way it looks when running Ubuntu under Windows. You can download the Ubuntu Font Family free.

Ubuntu Mono

Nice directory colors (DIRCOLORS/LS_COLORS)’

If you have a black command prompt background, then default colors for directories will be dark blue on black, which sucks. Fortunately you can get .dircolors files from all over the wep, or set the LS_COLORS (make sure to search for LS_COLORS for Linux, not the other, different LSCOLORS on Mac) environment variable.

I ended up with “dircolors-solarized” from here, downloaded it with wget or curl and put it in ~. Then confirm this is in your .bashrc (it likely is already)

# enable color support of ls and also add handy aliases
if [ -x /usr/bin/dircolors ]; then
test -r ~/.dircolors && eval "$(dircolors -b ~/.dircolors)" || eval "$(dircolors -b)"
alias ls='ls --color=auto'
alias dir='dir --color=auto'
#alias vdir='vdir --color=auto'

alias grep='grep --color=auto'
alias fgrep='fgrep --color=auto'
alias egrep='egrep --color=auto'
fi

Make a big difference for me, and as I mention, it’s totally, gloriously, maddeningly configurable.

Nice dircolors

Leave YOUR Linux on Windows tips in the comments!


Sponsor: Did you know VSTS can integrate closely with Octopus Deploy? Watch Damian Brady and Brian A. Randell as they show you how to automate deployments from VSTS to Octopus Deploy, and demo the new VSTS Octopus Deploy dashboard widget. Watch now


© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

While I was getting Ruby on Rails to work nicely under Ubuntu on Windows 10 I took the opportunity to set up my *nix bash environment, which was largely using defaults. Yes, I know I can use zsh or fish or other shells. Yes, I know I can use emacs and screen, but I am using Vim and tmux. Fight me. Anyway, once my post was done, I starting messing around with open source .NET Core on Linux (it runs on Windows, Mac, and Linux, but here I'm running on Linux on Windows. #Inception) and tweeted a pic of my desktop.

By the way, I feel totally vindicated by all the interest in "text mode" given my 2004 blog post "Windows is completely missing the TextMode boat." ;)'

Also, for those of you who are DEEPLY NOT INTERESTED in the command line, that's cool. You can stop reading now. Totally OK. I also use Visual Studio AND Visual Studio Code. Sometimes I click and mouse and sometimes I tap and type. There is room for us all.

WHAT IS ALL THIS LINUX ON WINDOWS STUFF? Here's a FAQ on the Bash/Windows Subsystem for Linux/Ubuntu on Windows/Snowball in Hell and some detailed Release Notes. Yes, it's real, and it's spectacular. Can't read that much text? Here's a video I did on Ubuntu on Windows 10.

A number of people asked me how they could set up their WSL (Windows Subsystem for Linux) installs to be something like this, so here's what I did. Note that will I've been using *nix on and off for 20+ years, I am by no means an expert. I am, and have been, Permanently Intermediate in my skills. I do not dream in RegEx, and I am offended that others can bust out an awk script without googling.

C9RT5_bUwAALJ-H

So there's a few things going on in this screenshot.

  • Running .NET Core on Linux (on Windows 10)
  • Cool VIM theme with >256 colors
  • Norton Midnight Commander in the corner (thanks Miguel)
  • Desqview-esque tmux splitter (with mouse support)
  • Some hotkey remapping, git prompt, completion
  • Ubuntu Mono font
  • Nice directory colors (DIRCOLORS/LS_COLORS)

Let's break them down one at a time. And, again, your mileage may vary, no warranty express or implied, any of this may destroy your world, you read this on a blog. Linux is infinitely configurable and the only constant is that my configuration rocks and yours sucks. Until I see something in yours that I can steal.

Running .NET Core on Linux (on Windows 10)

Since Linux on Windows 10 is (today) Ubuntu, you can install .NET Core within it just like any Linux. Here's the Ubuntu instructions for .NET Core's SDK. You may have Ubuntu 14.04 or 16.04 (you can upgrade your Linux on Windows if you like). Make sure you know what you're running by doing a:

~ $ lsb_release -a

No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID: Ubuntu
Description: Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS
Release: 16.04
Codename: xenial
~ $

If you're not on 16.04 you can easily remove and reinstall the whole subsystem with these commands at cmd.exe (note the /full is serious and torches the Linux filesystem):

> lxrun /uninstall /full

> lxrun /install

Or if you want you can run this within bash (will take longer but maintain settings):

sudo do-release-upgrade

Know what Ubuntu your Windows 10 has when you install .NET Core within it. The other thing to remember is that now you have two .NET Cores, one Windows and one Ubuntu, on the same (kinda) machine. Since the file systems are separated it's not a big deal. I do my development work within Ubuntu on /mnt/d/github (which is a Windows drive). It's OK for the Linux subsystem to edit files in Linux or Windows, but don't "reach into" the Linux file system from Windows.

Cool Vim theme with >256 colors

That Vim theme is gruvbox and I installed it like this. Thanks to Rich Turner for turning me on to this theme.

$ cd ~/

$ mkdir .vim
$ cd .vim
$ mkdir colors
$ cd colors
$ curl -O https://raw.githubusercontent.com/morhetz/gruvbox/master/colors/gruvbox.vim
$ cd ~/
$ vim .vimrc

Paste the following (hit ‘i’ for insert and then right click/paste)

set number

syntax enable
set background=dark
colorscheme gruvbox
set mouse=a

if &term =~ '256color'
" disable Background Color Erase (BCE) so that color schemes
" render properly when inside 256-color tmux and GNU screen.
" see also http://snk.tuxfamily.org/log/vim-256color-bce.html
set t_ut=
endif

Then save and exit with Esc, :wq (write and quit). There's a ton of themes out there, so try some for yourself!

Norton Midnight Commander in the corner (thanks Miguel)

Midnight Commander is a wonderful Norton Commander clone that Miguel de Icaza started, that's licensed as part of GNU. I installed it via apt, as I would any Ubuntu software.

$ sudo apt-get install mc

There's mouse support within the Windows conhost (console host) that bash runs within, so you'll even get mouse support within Midnight Commander!

Midnight Commander

Great stuff.

Desqview-esque tmux splitter (with mouse support)

Tmux is a terminal multiplexer. It's a text-mode windowing environment within which you can run multiple programs. Even better, you can "detach" from a running session and reattached from elsewhere. Because of this, folks love using tmux on servers where they can ssh in, set up an environment, detach, and reattach from elsewhere.

NOTE: The Windows Subsystem for Linux shuts down all background processes when the last console exits. So you can detach and attach tmux sessions happily, but just make sure you don't close every console on your machine.

Here's a nice animated gif of me moving the splitter on tmux on Windows. YES I KNOW YOU CAN USE THE KEYBOARD BUT THIS GIF IS COOL.

Some hotkey remapping, git prompt, completion

I am still learning tmux but here's my .tmux.conf. I've made a few common changes to make the hotkey creation of windows easier.

#remap prefix from 'C-b' to 'C-a'

unbind C-b
set-option -g prefix C-a
bind-key C-a send-prefix

# split panes using | and -
bind | split-window -h
bind _ split-window -v
unbind '"'
unbind %
bind k confirm kill-window
bind K confirm kill-server
bind < resize-pane -L 1
bind > resize-pane -R 1
bind - resize-pane -D 1
bind + resize-pane -U 1
bind r source-file ~/.tmux.conf

# switch panes using Alt-arrow without prefix
bind -n M-Left select-pane -L
bind -n M-Right select-pane -R
bind -n M-Up select-pane -U
bind -n M-Down select-pane -D

# Enable mouse control (clickable windows, panes, resizable panes)
set -g mouse on
set -g default-terminal "screen-256color"

I'm using the default Ubuntu .bashrc that includes a check for dircolors (more on this below) but I added this for git-completion.sh and a git prompt, as well as these two alias. I like being able to type "desktop" to jump to my Windows Desktop. And the -x on Midnight Commander helps the mouse support.

alias desktop="cd /mnt/c/Users/scott/Desktop"

alias mc="mc -x"
export CLICOLOR=1
source ~/.git-completion.sh
PS1='\[\033[37m\]\W\[\033[0m\]$(__git_ps1 " (\[\033[35m\]%s\[\033[0m\])") \$ '
GIT_PS1_SHOWDIRTYSTATE=1
GIT_PS1_SHOWSTASHSTATE=1
GIT_PS1_SHOWUNTRACKEDFILES=1
GIT_PS1_SHOWUPSTREAM="auto"

Git Completion can be installed with:

sudo apt-get install git bash-completion

Ubuntu Mono font

I really like the Ubuntu Mono font, and I like the way it looks when running Ubuntu under Windows. You can download the Ubuntu Font Family free.

Ubuntu Mono

Nice directory colors (DIRCOLORS/LS_COLORS)'

If you have a black command prompt background, then default colors for directories will be dark blue on black, which sucks. Fortunately you can get .dircolors files from all over the wep, or set the LS_COLORS (make sure to search for LS_COLORS for Linux, not the other, different LSCOLORS on Mac) environment variable.

I ended up with "dircolors-solarized" from here, downloaded it with wget or curl and put it in ~. Then confirm this is in your .bashrc (it likely is already)

# enable color support of ls and also add handy aliases

if [ -x /usr/bin/dircolors ]; then
test -r ~/.dircolors && eval "$(dircolors -b ~/.dircolors)" || eval "$(dircolors -b)"
alias ls='ls --color=auto'
alias dir='dir --color=auto'
#alias vdir='vdir --color=auto'

alias grep='grep --color=auto'
alias fgrep='fgrep --color=auto'
alias egrep='egrep --color=auto'
fi

Make a big difference for me, and as I mention, it's totally, gloriously, maddeningly configurable.

Nice dircolors

Leave YOUR Linux on Windows tips in the comments!


Sponsor: Did you know VSTS can integrate closely with Octopus Deploy? Watch Damian Brady and Brian A. Randell as they show you how to automate deployments from VSTS to Octopus Deploy, and demo the new VSTS Octopus Deploy dashboard widget. Watch now


© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Writing and debugging Linux C++ applications from Visual Studio using the “Windows Subsystem for Linux”

I’ve blogged about the “Windows Subsystem for Linux” (also known as “Bash on Ubuntu on Windows“) many times before. Response to this Windows feature has been a little funny because folks try to:

  • Minimize it – “Oh, it’s just Cygwin.” (It’s actually not, it’s the actual Ubuntu elf binaries running on a layer that abstracts the Linux kernel.)
  • Design it – “So it’s a docker container? A VM?” (Again, it’s a whole subsystem. It does WAY more than you’d think, and it’s FASTer than a VM.)

Here’s a simple explanation from Andrew Pardoe:

1. The developer/user uses a bash shell.
2. The bash shell runs on an install of Ubuntu
3. The Ubuntu install runs on a Windows subsystem. This subsystem is designed to support Linux.

It’s pretty cool. WSL has, frankly, kept me running Windows because I can run cmd, powershell, OR bash (or zsh or Fish). You can run vim, emacs, tmux, and run Javascript/node.js, Ruby, Python, C/C++, C# & F#, Rust, Go, and more. You can also now run sshd, MySQL, Apache, lighttpd as long as you know that when you close your last console the background services will shut down. Bash on Windows is for developers, not background server apps. And of course, you apt-get your way to glory.

Bash on Windows runs Ubuntu user-mode binaries provided by Canonical. This means the command-line utilities are the same as those that run within a native Ubuntu environment.

I wanted to write a Linux Console app in C++ using Visual Studio in Windows. Why? Why not? I like VS.

Setting up Visual Studio 2017 to compile and debug C++ apps on Linux

Then, from the bash shell make sure you have build-essential, gdb’s server, and openssh’s server:

$ sudo apt update
$ sudo apt install -y build-essential
$ sudo apt install -y gdbserver
$ sudo apt install -y openssh-server

Then open up /etc/ssh/sshd_config with vi (or nano) like

sudo nano /etc/ssh/sshd_config

and for simplicity’s sake, set PasswordAuthentication to yes. Remember that it’s not as big a security issue as you’d think as the SSHD daemon closes when your last console does, and because WSL’s subsystem has to play well with Windows, it’s privy to the Windows Firewall and all its existing rules, plus we’re talking localhost also.

Now generate SSH keys and manually start the service:

$ sudo ssh-keygen -A
$ sudo service ssh start

Create a Linux app in Visual Studio (or open a Makefile app):

File | New Project | Cross Platform | Linux

Make sure you know your target (x64, x86, ARM):

Remote GDB Debugger options

In Visual Studio’s Cross Platform Connection Manager you can control your SSH connections (and set up ones with private keys, if you like.)

Tools | Options | Cross Platfrom | Connection Manager

 

Boom. I’m writing C++ for LInux in Visual Studio on Windows…running, compiling and debugging on the local Linux Subsystem

I'm writing C++ in Visual Studio on Windows talking to the local Linux Subsystem

BTW, for those of you, like me, who love your Raspberry Pi tiny Linux computers…this is a great way to write C++ for those little devices as well. There’s even a Blink example in File | New Project to start.

Also, for those of you who are very advanced, stop using Mingw-w64 and do cool stuff like compiling gcc 6.3 from source under WSL and having VS use that! I didn’t realize that Visual Studio’s C++ support lets you choose between a number of C++ compilers including both GCC and Clang.


Sponsor: Thanks to Redgate! Track every change to your database! See who made changes, what they did, & why, with SQL Source Control. Get a full version history in your source control system. See how.


© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

I've blogged about the "Windows Subsystem for Linux" (also known as "Bash on Ubuntu on Windows") many times before. Response to this Windows feature has been a little funny because folks try to:

  • Minimize it - "Oh, it's just Cygwin." (It's actually not, it's the actual Ubuntu elf binaries running on a layer that abstracts the Linux kernel.)
  • Design it - "So it's a docker container? A VM?" (Again, it's a whole subsystem. It does WAY more than you'd think, and it's FASTer than a VM.)

Here's a simple explanation from Andrew Pardoe:

1. The developer/user uses a bash shell.
2. The bash shell runs on an install of Ubuntu
3. The Ubuntu install runs on a Windows subsystem. This subsystem is designed to support Linux.

It's pretty cool. WSL has, frankly, kept me running Windows because I can run cmd, powershell, OR bash (or zsh or Fish). You can run vim, emacs, tmux, and run Javascript/node.js, Ruby, Python, C/C++, C# & F#, Rust, Go, and more. You can also now run sshd, MySQL, Apache, lighttpd as long as you know that when you close your last console the background services will shut down. Bash on Windows is for developers, not background server apps. And of course, you apt-get your way to glory.

Bash on Windows runs Ubuntu user-mode binaries provided by Canonical. This means the command-line utilities are the same as those that run within a native Ubuntu environment.

I wanted to write a Linux Console app in C++ using Visual Studio in Windows. Why? Why not? I like VS.

Setting up Visual Studio 2017 to compile and debug C++ apps on Linux

Then, from the bash shell make sure you have build-essential, gdb's server, and openssh's server:

$ sudo apt update

$ sudo apt install -y build-essential
$ sudo apt install -y gdbserver
$ sudo apt install -y openssh-server

Then open up /etc/ssh/sshd_config with vi (or nano) like

sudo nano /etc/ssh/sshd_config

and for simplicity's sake, set PasswordAuthentication to yes. Remember that it's not as big a security issue as you'd think as the SSHD daemon closes when your last console does, and because WSL's subsystem has to play well with Windows, it's privy to the Windows Firewall and all its existing rules, plus we're talking localhost also.

Now generate SSH keys and manually start the service:

$ sudo ssh-keygen -A

$ sudo service ssh start

Create a Linux app in Visual Studio (or open a Makefile app):

File | New Project | Cross Platform | Linux

Make sure you know your target (x64, x86, ARM):

Remote GDB Debugger options

In Visual Studio's Cross Platform Connection Manager you can control your SSH connections (and set up ones with private keys, if you like.)

Tools | Options | Cross Platfrom | Connection Manager

 

Boom. I'm writing C++ for LInux in Visual Studio on Windows...running, compiling and debugging on the local Linux Subsystem

I'm writing C++ in Visual Studio on Windows talking to the local Linux Subsystem

BTW, for those of you, like me, who love your Raspberry Pi tiny Linux computers...this is a great way to write C++ for those little devices as well. There's even a Blink example in File | New Project to start.

Also, for those of you who are very advanced, stop using Mingw-w64 and do cool stuff like compiling gcc 6.3 from source under WSL and having VS use that! I didn't realize that Visual Studio's C++ support lets you choose between a number of C++ compilers including both GCC and Clang.


Sponsor: Thanks to Redgate! Track every change to your database! See who made changes, what they did, & why, with SQL Source Control. Get a full version history in your source control system. See how.


© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Temporary Fix: Logitech BRIO Camera broken on Windows 10 Insiders 15042

I just updated my Windows 10 to Insiders Fast Build 15042, and suddenly my glorious new Logitech BRIO 4k webcam doesn’t work! Well, it’s all beta software, but it turns out the issue is with something in the Logitech INF files for their drivers. I’m assuming they’ll figure it out, but the nutshell is that the first install works, but the driver gets messed up on the upgrade. You can’t just pull out the camera and put it in again, you need to DELETE the drivers and have them redownloaded by Windows Update/Device Manager.

Here’s a temporary fix (either until Logitech fixes it and it shows up in Windows Update or you take another Windows 10 upgrade):

Logitech BRIO stops working on Windows 10 Insiders UPGRADE

Go to device manager and right click the device and Uninstall Driver. If it has the checkbox “Delete this driver” then check it. That’s required. IF (like me) you don’t have that checkbox (I’m not sure why I don’t) then you’ll need to delete the Logitech driver from the DriverStore. You can do it manually but it’s tricky and messy and hard.

We need to delete this driver so it gets reinstalled cleanly.

Driver 2/31/2017

Unplug your webcam. Then, go get the latest copy of DriverStoreExplorer from here https://github.com/lostindark/DriverStoreExplorer/releases and delete JUST this one driver.

Using the Driver Store Explorer

Now, go back to Device Manager and plug in your Logitech BRIO webcam. Note you’ll get some super old 2006 driver. Right click the BRIO in Imaging Devices and Update Driver. This will get you BACK to your original state. You still have a driver that will break when you next take a “major” Windows update or Insiders Build, but at least you have a solution until it magically gets fixed.

Yay!


Sponsor: Big thanks to Progress! They recently published a comprehensive whitepaper on The State of C#, discussing the history of C#, what’s new in C# 7 and whether C# is still a viable language. Check it out!


© 2016 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

I just updated my Windows 10 to Insiders Fast Build 15042, and suddenly my glorious new Logitech BRIO 4k webcam doesn't work! Well, it's all beta software, but it turns out the issue is with something in the Logitech INF files for their drivers. I'm assuming they'll figure it out, but the nutshell is that the first install works, but the driver gets messed up on the upgrade. You can't just pull out the camera and put it in again, you need to DELETE the drivers and have them redownloaded by Windows Update/Device Manager.

Here's a temporary fix (either until Logitech fixes it and it shows up in Windows Update or you take another Windows 10 upgrade):

Logitech BRIO stops working on Windows 10 Insiders UPGRADE

Go to device manager and right click the device and Uninstall Driver. If it has the checkbox "Delete this driver" then check it. That's required. IF (like me) you don't have that checkbox (I'm not sure why I don't) then you'll need to delete the Logitech driver from the DriverStore. You can do it manually but it's tricky and messy and hard.

We need to delete this driver so it gets reinstalled cleanly.

Driver 2/31/2017

Unplug your webcam. Then, go get the latest copy of DriverStoreExplorer from here https://github.com/lostindark/DriverStoreExplorer/releases and delete JUST this one driver.

Using the Driver Store Explorer

Now, go back to Device Manager and plug in your Logitech BRIO webcam. Note you'll get some super old 2006 driver. Right click the BRIO in Imaging Devices and Update Driver. This will get you BACK to your original state. You still have a driver that will break when you next take a "major" Windows update or Insiders Build, but at least you have a solution until it magically gets fixed.

Yay!


Sponsor: Big thanks to Progress! They recently published a comprehensive whitepaper on The State of C#, discussing the history of C#, what’s new in C# 7 and whether C# is still a viable language. Check it out!


© 2016 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

WinAppDriver – Test any app with Appium’s Selenium-like tests on Windows

WinAppDriver - Appium testing Windows Apps

I’ve found blog posts on my site where I’m using the Selenium Web Testing Framework as far back as 2007! Today there’s Selenium Drivers for every web browser including Microsoft Edge. You can write Selenium tests in nearly any language these days including Ruby, Python, Java, and C#.

I’m a big Selenium fan. I like using it with systems like BrowserStack to automate across many different browser on many operating systems.

“Appium” is a great Selenium-like testing framework that implements the “WebDriver” protocol – formerly JsonWireProtocol.

WebDriver is a remote control interface that enables introspection and control of user agents. It provides a platform- and language-neutral wire protocol as a way for out-of-process programs to remotely instruct the behavior of web browsers.

From the Appium website, “Appium is ‘cross-platform’: it allows you to write tests against multiple platforms (iOS, Android, Windows), using the same API. This enables code reuse between iOS, Android, and Windows testsuites”

Appium is a webserver that exposes a REST API. The WinAppDriver enables Appium by using new APIs that were added in Windows 10 Anniversary Edition that allow you to test any Windows app. That means ANY Windows App. Win32, VB6, WPF, UWP, anything. Not only can you put any app in the Windows Store, you can do full and complete UI testing of those apps with a tool that is already familiar to Web Developers like myself.

Your preferred language, your preferred test runner, the Appium Server, and your app

You can write tests in C# and run them from Visual Studio’s Test Runner. You can press any button and basically totally control your apps.

// Launch the calculator app
DesiredCapabilities appCapabilities = new DesiredCapabilities();
appCapabilities.SetCapability("app", "Microsoft.WindowsCalculator_8wekyb3d8bbwe!App");
CalculatorSession = new RemoteWebDriver(new Uri(WindowsApplicationDriverUrl), appCapabilities);
Assert.IsNotNull(CalculatorSession);
CalculatorSession.Manage().Timeouts().ImplicitlyWait(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2));
// Make sure we're in standard mode
CalculatorSession.FindElementByXPath("//Button[starts-with(@Name, \"Menu\")]").Click();
OriginalCalculatorMode = CalculatorSession.FindElementByXPath("//List[@AutomationId=\"FlyoutNav\"]//ListItem[@IsSelected=\"True\"]").Text;
CalculatorSession.FindElementByXPath("//ListItem[@Name=\"Standard Calculator\"]").Click();

It’s surprisingly easy once you get started.

public void Addition()
{
CalculatorSession.FindElementByName("One").Click();
CalculatorSession.FindElementByName("Plus").Click();
CalculatorSession.FindElementByName("Seven").Click();
CalculatorSession.FindElementByName("Equals").Click();
Assert.AreEqual("Display is 8 ", CalculatorResult.Text);
}

You can automate any part of Windows, even the Start Menu or Cortana.

var searchBox = CortanaSession.FindElementByAccessibilityId("SearchTextBox");
Assert.IsNotNull(searchBox);
searchBox.SendKeys("What is eight times eleven");

var bingPane = CortanaSession.FindElementByName("Bing");
Assert.IsNotNull(bingPane);

var bingResult = bingPane.FindElementByName("88");
Assert.IsNotNull(bingResult);

If you use “AccessibiltyIds” and refer to native controls in a non-locale specific way you can even reuse test code across platforms. For example, you could write sign in code for Windows, iOS, your web app, and even a VB6 Win32 app. 😉

Testing a VB6 app with WinAppDriver

Appium and WebAppDriver a nice alternative to “CodedUI Tests.” CodedUI tests are great but just for Windows apps. If you’re a web developer or you are writing cross platform or mobile apps you should check it out.


Sponsor: Help your team write better, shareable SQL faster! Discover how your whole team can write better, shareable SQL faster with a free trial of SQL Prompt. Write, refactor and share SQL effortlessly, try it now.


© 2016 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     
WinAppDriver - Appium testing Windows Apps

I've found blog posts on my site where I'm using the Selenium Web Testing Framework as far back as 2007! Today there's Selenium Drivers for every web browser including Microsoft Edge. You can write Selenium tests in nearly any language these days including Ruby, Python, Java, and C#.

I'm a big Selenium fan. I like using it with systems like BrowserStack to automate across many different browser on many operating systems.

"Appium" is a great Selenium-like testing framework that implements the "WebDriver" protocol - formerly JsonWireProtocol.

WebDriver is a remote control interface that enables introspection and control of user agents. It provides a platform- and language-neutral wire protocol as a way for out-of-process programs to remotely instruct the behavior of web browsers.

From the Appium website, "Appium is 'cross-platform': it allows you to write tests against multiple platforms (iOS, Android, Windows), using the same API. This enables code reuse between iOS, Android, and Windows testsuites"

Appium is a webserver that exposes a REST API. The WinAppDriver enables Appium by using new APIs that were added in Windows 10 Anniversary Edition that allow you to test any Windows app. That means ANY Windows App. Win32, VB6, WPF, UWP, anything. Not only can you put any app in the Windows Store, you can do full and complete UI testing of those apps with a tool that is already familiar to Web Developers like myself.

Your preferred language, your preferred test runner, the Appium Server, and your app

You can write tests in C# and run them from Visual Studio's Test Runner. You can press any button and basically totally control your apps.

// Launch the calculator app

DesiredCapabilities appCapabilities = new DesiredCapabilities();
appCapabilities.SetCapability("app", "Microsoft.WindowsCalculator_8wekyb3d8bbwe!App");
CalculatorSession = new RemoteWebDriver(new Uri(WindowsApplicationDriverUrl), appCapabilities);
Assert.IsNotNull(CalculatorSession);
CalculatorSession.Manage().Timeouts().ImplicitlyWait(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2));
// Make sure we're in standard mode
CalculatorSession.FindElementByXPath("//Button[starts-with(@Name, \"Menu\")]").Click();
OriginalCalculatorMode = CalculatorSession.FindElementByXPath("//List[@AutomationId=\"FlyoutNav\"]//ListItem[@IsSelected=\"True\"]").Text;
CalculatorSession.FindElementByXPath("//ListItem[@Name=\"Standard Calculator\"]").Click();

It's surprisingly easy once you get started.

public void Addition()

{
CalculatorSession.FindElementByName("One").Click();
CalculatorSession.FindElementByName("Plus").Click();
CalculatorSession.FindElementByName("Seven").Click();
CalculatorSession.FindElementByName("Equals").Click();
Assert.AreEqual("Display is 8 ", CalculatorResult.Text);
}

You can automate any part of Windows, even the Start Menu or Cortana.

var searchBox = CortanaSession.FindElementByAccessibilityId("SearchTextBox");

Assert.IsNotNull(searchBox);
searchBox.SendKeys("What is eight times eleven");

var bingPane = CortanaSession.FindElementByName("Bing");
Assert.IsNotNull(bingPane);

var bingResult = bingPane.FindElementByName("88");
Assert.IsNotNull(bingResult);

If you use "AccessibiltyIds" and refer to native controls in a non-locale specific way you can even reuse test code across platforms. For example, you could write sign in code for Windows, iOS, your web app, and even a VB6 Win32 app. ;)

Testing a VB6 app with WinAppDriver

Appium and WebAppDriver a nice alternative to "CodedUI Tests." CodedUI tests are great but just for Windows apps. If you're a web developer or you are writing cross platform or mobile apps you should check it out.


Sponsor: Help your team write better, shareable SQL faster! Discover how your whole team can write better, shareable SQL faster with a free trial of SQL Prompt. Write, refactor and share SQL effortlessly, try it now.



© 2016 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Putting (my VB6) Windows Apps in the Windows 10 Store – Project Centennial

Evernote in the Windows 10 Store with Project CentennialI noticed today that Evernote was in the Windows Store. I went to the store, installed Evernote, and it ran. No nextnextnextfinish-style install, it just worked and it worked nicely. It’s a Win32 app and it appears to use NodeWebKit for part of it’s UI. But it’s a Windows app, just like VB6 apps and just like .NET apps and just like UWP (Universal Windows Platform) apps, so I found this to be pretty cool. Now that the Evernote app is a store app it can use Windows 10 specific features like Live Tiles and Notifications and it’ll be always up to date.

The Windows Store is starting (slowly) to roll out and include existing desktop apps and games by building and packaging those apps using the Universal Windows Platform. This was called “Project Centennial” when they announced it at the BUILD conference. It lets you basically put any Windows App in the Windows Store, which is cool. Apps that live there are safe, can’t really mess up your machine, and are quickly installed and uninstalled.

Here’s some of the details about what’s happening with your app behind the scenes, from this article. This is one of the main benefits of the Windows Store. Apps from the Store can’t mess up your system on a global scale.

[The app] runs in a special environment where any accesses that the app makes to the file system and to the Registry are redirected. The file named Registry.dat is used for Registry redirection. It’s actually a Registry hive, so you can view it in the Windows Registry Editor (Regedit). When it comes to the file system, the only thing redirected is the AppData folder, and it is redirected to the same location that app data is stored for all UWP apps. This location is known as the local app data store, and you access it by using the ApplicationData.LocalFolderproperty. This way, your code is already ported to read and write app data in the correct place without you doing anything. And you can also write there directly. One benefit of file system redirection is a cleaner uninstall experience.

The “DesktopAppConverter” is now packaged in the Windows Store as well, even though it runs at the command prompt! If your Windows Desktop app has a “silent installer” then you can run this DesktopAppConvertor on your installer to make an APPX package that you can then theoretically upload to the Store.

NOTE: This “Centennial” technology is in Windows 10 AU, so if you haven’t auto-updated yet, you can get AU now.

They are also working with install vendors like InstallShield and WiX to so their installation creation apps will create Windows Store apps with the Desktop Bridge automatically. This way your existing MSIs and stuff can turn into UWP packages and live in the store.

DesktopAppConverter

It looks like there are a few ways to make your existing Windows apps into Windows 10 Store-ready apps. You can use this DesktopAppConverter and run it in your existing  silent installer. Once you’ve made your app a Store App, you can “light up” your app with Live Tiles and Notifications and  other features with code. Check out the https://github.com/Microsoft/DesktopBridgeToUWP-Samples GitHub Repro with samples that show you how to add Tiles or Background tasks. You can use [Conditional(“DesktopUWP”)] compilation if you have both a Windows Store and Windows desktop version of your app with a traditional installer.

If your app is a simple Xcopy-deploy app that has no installer, it’s even easier. To prove this I installed Visual Basic 6 on my Windows 10 machine. OH YES I DID.

NOTE: I am using VB6 as a fun but also very cool example. VB6 is long out of support but apps created with it still run great on Windows because they are win32 apps. For me, this means that if I had a VB6 app that I wanted to move into the Store and widen my audience, I could.

I made a quick little Project1.exe in VB6 that runs on its own.

Visual Basic 6 on Windows 10

I made an AppxManifest.xml with these contents following this HelloWorld sample.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Package
xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/appx/manifest/foundation/windows10"
xmlns:uap="http://schemas.microsoft.com/appx/manifest/uap/windows10"
xmlns:rescap="http://schemas.microsoft.com/appx/manifest/foundation/windows10/restrictedcapabilities">
<Identity Name="HanselmanVB6"
ProcessorArchitecture="x64"
Publisher="CN=HanselmanVB6"
Version="1.0.0.0" />
<Properties>
<DisplayName>Scott Hanselman uses VB6</DisplayName>
<PublisherDisplayName>Reserved</PublisherDisplayName>
<Description>I wish there was a description entered</Description>
<Logo>Assets\Logo.png</Logo>
</Properties>
<Resources>
<Resource Language="en-us" />
</Resources>
<Dependencies>
<TargetDeviceFamily Name="Windows.Desktop" MinVersion="10.0.14316.0" MaxVersionTested="10.0.14316.0" />
</Dependencies>
<Capabilities>
<rescap:Capability Name="runFullTrust"/>
</Capabilities>
<Applications>
<Application Id="HanselmanVB6" Executable="Project1.exe" EntryPoint="Windows.FullTrustApplication">
<uap:VisualElements
BackgroundColor="#464646"
DisplayName="Hey it's VB6"
Square150x150Logo="Assets\SampleAppx.150x150.png"
Square44x44Logo="Assets\SampleAppx.44x44.png"
Description="Hey it's VB6" />
</Application>
</Applications>
</Package>

In the folder is my Project1.exe long with an Assets folder with my logo and a few PNGs.

Then I run the DesktopAppConverter and run this to test on my local machine.

Add-AppxPackage -register .\AppxManifest.xml

And now my little VB6 app is installed locally and in my Start Menu.

VB6 as a Windows App

When I am ready to get my app ready for production and submission to the Store I’ll follow the guidance and docs here and use Visual Studio, or just do the work manually at the command line with the MakeAppx and SignTool utilities.

"C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\10\bin\x86\makeappx" pack /d . /p Project1.appx

Later I’ll buy a code signing cert, but for now I’ll make a fake local one, trust it, and make a pfx cert.

"C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\10\bin\x86\makecert" /n "CN=HanselmanVB6" /r /pe /h /0 /eku "1.3.6.1.5.5.7.3.3,1.3.6.1.4.1.311.10.3.13" /e 12/31/2016 /sv MyLocalKey1.pvk MyLocalKey1.cer
"C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\10\bin\x86\pvk2pfx" -po -pvk MyLocalKey1.pvk -spc MyLocalKey1.cer -pfx MyLocalKey1.pfx
certutil -user -addstore Root MyLocalKey1.cer

Now I’ll sign my Appx.

NOTE: Make sure the Identity in the AppxManifest matches the code signing cert’s CN=Identity. That’s the FULL string from the cert. Otherwise you’ll see weird stuff in your Event Viewer in Microsoft|Windows\AppxPackagingOM|Microsoft-Windows-AppxPackaging/Operational like “error 0x8007000B: The app manifest publisher name (CN=HanselmanVB6, O=Hanselman, L=Portland, S=OR, C=USA) must match the subject name of the signing certificate exactly (CN=HanselmanVB6).”

I’ll use a command line like this. Remember that Visual Studio can hide a lot of this, but since I’m doing it manually it’s good to understand the details.

"C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\10\bin\x86\signtool.exe" sign /debug /fd SHA256 /a /f MyLocalKey1.pfx Project1.appx

The following certificates were considered:
Issued to: HanselmanVB6
Issued by: HanselmanVB6
Expires: Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 2016
SHA1 hash: 19F384D1D0BD33F107B2D7344C4CA40F2A557749

After EKU filter, 1 certs were left.
After expiry filter, 1 certs were left.
After Private Key filter, 1 certs were left.
The following certificate was selected:
Issued to: HanselmanVB6
Issued by: HanselmanVB6
Expires: Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 2016
SHA1 hash: 19F384D1D0BD33F107B2D7344C4CA40F2A557749


The following additional certificates will be attached:
Done Adding Additional Store
Successfully signed: Project1.appx

Number of files successfully Signed: 1
Number of warnings: 0
Number of errors: 0

Now I’ve got a (local developer) signed, packaged Appx that has a VB6 app inside it. If I double click I’ll get the Appx installer, but what I really want to do is sign it with a real cert and put it in the Windows Store!

VB6 in the Windows Store

Here’s the app running. Pretty amazing UX, I know.

VB6 app as a Windows Store App

It’s early days, IMHO, but I’m looking forward to a time when I can go to the Windows Store and get my favorite apps like Windows Open Live Writer, Office, Slack, and more! Now’s the time for you to start exploring these tools.

Related Links


Sponsor: Big thanks to Redgate for sponsoring the feed this week. Discover the world’s most trusted SQL Server comparison tool. Enjoy a free trial of SQL Compare, the industry standard for comparing and deploying SQL Server schemas.


© 2016 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Evernote in the Windows 10 Store with Project CentennialI noticed today that Evernote was in the Windows Store. I went to the store, installed Evernote, and it ran. No nextnextnextfinish-style install, it just worked and it worked nicely. It's a Win32 app and it appears to use NodeWebKit for part of it's UI. But it's a Windows app, just like VB6 apps and just like .NET apps and just like UWP (Universal Windows Platform) apps, so I found this to be pretty cool. Now that the Evernote app is a store app it can use Windows 10 specific features like Live Tiles and Notifications and it'll be always up to date.

The Windows Store is starting (slowly) to roll out and include existing desktop apps and games by building and packaging those apps using the Universal Windows Platform. This was called "Project Centennial" when they announced it at the BUILD conference. It lets you basically put any Windows App in the Windows Store, which is cool. Apps that live there are safe, can't really mess up your machine, and are quickly installed and uninstalled.

Here's some of the details about what's happening with your app behind the scenes, from this article. This is one of the main benefits of the Windows Store. Apps from the Store can't mess up your system on a global scale.

[The app] runs in a special environment where any accesses that the app makes to the file system and to the Registry are redirected. The file named Registry.dat is used for Registry redirection. It's actually a Registry hive, so you can view it in the Windows Registry Editor (Regedit). When it comes to the file system, the only thing redirected is the AppData folder, and it is redirected to the same location that app data is stored for all UWP apps. This location is known as the local app data store, and you access it by using the ApplicationData.LocalFolderproperty. This way, your code is already ported to read and write app data in the correct place without you doing anything. And you can also write there directly. One benefit of file system redirection is a cleaner uninstall experience.

The "DesktopAppConverter" is now packaged in the Windows Store as well, even though it runs at the command prompt! If your Windows Desktop app has a "silent installer" then you can run this DesktopAppConvertor on your installer to make an APPX package that you can then theoretically upload to the Store.

NOTE: This "Centennial" technology is in Windows 10 AU, so if you haven't auto-updated yet, you can get AU now.

They are also working with install vendors like InstallShield and WiX to so their installation creation apps will create Windows Store apps with the Desktop Bridge automatically. This way your existing MSIs and stuff can turn into UWP packages and live in the store.

DesktopAppConverter

It looks like there are a few ways to make your existing Windows apps into Windows 10 Store-ready apps. You can use this DesktopAppConverter and run it in your existing  silent installer. Once you've made your app a Store App, you can "light up" your app with Live Tiles and Notifications and  other features with code. Check out the https://github.com/Microsoft/DesktopBridgeToUWP-Samples GitHub Repro with samples that show you how to add Tiles or Background tasks. You can use [Conditional("DesktopUWP")] compilation if you have both a Windows Store and Windows desktop version of your app with a traditional installer.

If your app is a simple Xcopy-deploy app that has no installer, it's even easier. To prove this I installed Visual Basic 6 on my Windows 10 machine. OH YES I DID.

NOTE: I am using VB6 as a fun but also very cool example. VB6 is long out of support but apps created with it still run great on Windows because they are win32 apps. For me, this means that if I had a VB6 app that I wanted to move into the Store and widen my audience, I could.

I made a quick little Project1.exe in VB6 that runs on its own.

Visual Basic 6 on Windows 10

I made an AppxManifest.xml with these contents following this HelloWorld sample.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>

<Package
xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/appx/manifest/foundation/windows10"
xmlns:uap="http://schemas.microsoft.com/appx/manifest/uap/windows10"
xmlns:rescap="http://schemas.microsoft.com/appx/manifest/foundation/windows10/restrictedcapabilities">
<Identity Name="HanselmanVB6"
ProcessorArchitecture="x64"
Publisher="CN=HanselmanVB6"
Version="1.0.0.0" />
<Properties>
<DisplayName>Scott Hanselman uses VB6</DisplayName>
<PublisherDisplayName>Reserved</PublisherDisplayName>
<Description>I wish there was a description entered</Description>
<Logo>Assets\Logo.png</Logo>
</Properties>
<Resources>
<Resource Language="en-us" />
</Resources>
<Dependencies>
<TargetDeviceFamily Name="Windows.Desktop" MinVersion="10.0.14316.0" MaxVersionTested="10.0.14316.0" />
</Dependencies>
<Capabilities>
<rescap:Capability Name="runFullTrust"/>
</Capabilities>
<Applications>
<Application Id="HanselmanVB6" Executable="Project1.exe" EntryPoint="Windows.FullTrustApplication">
<uap:VisualElements
BackgroundColor="#464646"
DisplayName="Hey it's VB6"
Square150x150Logo="Assets\SampleAppx.150x150.png"
Square44x44Logo="Assets\SampleAppx.44x44.png"
Description="Hey it's VB6" />
</Application>
</Applications>
</Package>

In the folder is my Project1.exe long with an Assets folder with my logo and a few PNGs.

Then I run the DesktopAppConverter and run this to test on my local machine.

Add-AppxPackage -register .\AppxManifest.xml

And now my little VB6 app is installed locally and in my Start Menu.

VB6 as a Windows App

When I am ready to get my app ready for production and submission to the Store I'll follow the guidance and docs here and use Visual Studio, or just do the work manually at the command line with the MakeAppx and SignTool utilities.

"C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\10\bin\x86\makeappx" pack /d . /p Project1.appx

Later I'll buy a code signing cert, but for now I'll make a fake local one, trust it, and make a pfx cert.

"C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\10\bin\x86\makecert" /n "CN=HanselmanVB6" /r /pe /h /0 /eku "1.3.6.1.5.5.7.3.3,1.3.6.1.4.1.311.10.3.13" /e 12/31/2016 /sv MyLocalKey1.pvk MyLocalKey1.cer

"C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\10\bin\x86\pvk2pfx" -po -pvk MyLocalKey1.pvk -spc MyLocalKey1.cer -pfx MyLocalKey1.pfx
certutil -user -addstore Root MyLocalKey1.cer

Now I'll sign my Appx.

NOTE: Make sure the Identity in the AppxManifest matches the code signing cert's CN=Identity. That's the FULL string from the cert. Otherwise you'll see weird stuff in your Event Viewer in Microsoft|Windows\AppxPackagingOM|Microsoft-Windows-AppxPackaging/Operational like "error 0x8007000B: The app manifest publisher name (CN=HanselmanVB6, O=Hanselman, L=Portland, S=OR, C=USA) must match the subject name of the signing certificate exactly (CN=HanselmanVB6)."

I'll use a command line like this. Remember that Visual Studio can hide a lot of this, but since I'm doing it manually it's good to understand the details.

"C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\10\bin\x86\signtool.exe" sign /debug /fd SHA256 /a /f MyLocalKey1.pfx Project1.appx


The following certificates were considered:
Issued to: HanselmanVB6
Issued by: HanselmanVB6
Expires: Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 2016
SHA1 hash: 19F384D1D0BD33F107B2D7344C4CA40F2A557749

After EKU filter, 1 certs were left.
After expiry filter, 1 certs were left.
After Private Key filter, 1 certs were left.
The following certificate was selected:
Issued to: HanselmanVB6
Issued by: HanselmanVB6
Expires: Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 2016
SHA1 hash: 19F384D1D0BD33F107B2D7344C4CA40F2A557749


The following additional certificates will be attached:
Done Adding Additional Store
Successfully signed: Project1.appx

Number of files successfully Signed: 1
Number of warnings: 0
Number of errors: 0

Now I've got a (local developer) signed, packaged Appx that has a VB6 app inside it. If I double click I'll get the Appx installer, but what I really want to do is sign it with a real cert and put it in the Windows Store!

VB6 in the Windows Store

Here's the app running. Pretty amazing UX, I know.

VB6 app as a Windows Store App

It's early days, IMHO, but I'm looking forward to a time when I can go to the Windows Store and get my favorite apps like Windows Open Live Writer, Office, Slack, and more! Now's the time for you to start exploring these tools.

Related Links


Sponsor: Big thanks to Redgate for sponsoring the feed this week. Discover the world’s most trusted SQL Server comparison tool. Enjoy a free trial of SQL Compare, the industry standard for comparing and deploying SQL Server schemas.



© 2016 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.