How to Add a Trello-Like Kanban Board in WordPress

Do you want to add a Trello-like Kanban board to your WordPress website? Keeping track of your team’s projects, monitoring sales progress, and staying in touch with existing customers can be challenging if you are not organized. In this article, we will share how you… Read More »

The post How to Add a Trello-Like Kanban Board in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

Do you want to add a Trello-like Kanban board to your WordPress website? Keeping track of your team’s projects, monitoring sales progress, and staying in touch with existing customers can be challenging if you are not organized. In this article, we will share how you can streamline your workflows by creating a Trello-like Kanban board in WordPress.

Trello-Like Kanban Board WordPress

What is a Kanban Board?

A Kanban board is a workflow visualization tool that helps you optimize your processes and track progress of each task, no matter how complex they are.

Simple Kanban boards consist of three columns labeled To Do, In Progress, and Done. Each column represents a different stage in the workflow process. You can add individual tasks in the respective column.

The individual task item moves horizontally across the board as each stage is performed until it reaches the Done column. This is where the workflow ends and the project is considered complete.

Why Use a Kanban Board in WordPress?

There are several reasons why you might want to add a Kanban board to your WordPress website. For example, they offer an easy way to organize workflows, boost productivity amongst teams, and create a way for people to focus on what needs to be done and in what order.

More specifically, you might consider using a Kanban board in WordPress for the following reasons:

  • Project Management. If you work with a team and each member is responsible for separate tasks, then using a Kanban board helps organize those tasks and keep everyone productive. You can visually see the status of every project, at every stage, at any time.
  • Track Sales Goals. If you run a business that relies on sales revenue, then using a Kanban board allows you to work smarter, not harder. You just need to determine individual steps for attracting new customers, pitching sales, and securing transactions. From there, watch your sales team perform and see where improvements are needed.
  • Editorial Calendar. Publishing consistent content on your WordPress website is crucial for driving traffic to your site, engaging visitors, and converting readers into customers. You can plan ahead with a Kanban board and assign tasks to your team so content is ready to go when you need it.
  • CRM (Customer Relationship Management). Staying on top of existing customer relationships, as well as garnering new ones, is important for any business to succeed. You can add a Kanban board in WordPress with tasks related to reaching out to old customers, addressing questions and concerns of potential customers, and generating more leads that can help close additional sales and boost revenue.

As you can see, using a Kanban board for your WordPress website is a great way to become more productive all around, no matter what your end goals are.

While there are several third-party Kanban board solutions available like Trello, Jira, and Asana, some people prefer to keep everything in their WordPress site.

It helps keep things centralized and saves money on third-party services.

Having that said, let’s take a look at how to create a Trello-like Kanban board in WordPress.

How to Add a Kanban Board in WordPress

Kanban Boards for WordPress Plugin

The first thing you need to do is install and activate the Kanban Boards for WordPress plugin. For more details on how to do that, see our guide on how to install a WordPress plugin.

Upon activation, you will be prompted with an option to choose which type of Kanban board you plan to set up.

Kanban Boards for WordPress Plugin - Kanban Board Types

You have the option to choose from Project Management, Editorial Calendar, Job Applicant Tracking, Sales Pipeline, Basic, and Custom. Each option comes with their own set of statuses, which can be customized to your liking.

Once you decide which one you would like to use, select Set it up!. For this example, we are going to use the Basic Kanban board option which has the statuses of To Do, Doing, and Done.

Configure Your General Settings

After you choose which pre-designed Kanban board you want to use, you need to navigate to the Settings tab to configure your plugin settings.

Kanban Boards for WordPress Plugin - Settings

Under the General tab, you will have the option to determine which increments of time you want users to track their progress in. For instance, we have chosen to track hours.

Kanban Boards for WordPress Plugin - Settings, General

In this section, you will also decide things such as:

  • Whether to hide the time tracking
  • If you want to display task IDs
  • If you want all columns to display
  • Whether to use the default login screen or not

Kanban Boards for WordPress Plugin - Settings, General.2

Configure Your User Settings

Under the Users tab, you will first define who is allowed to make changes to the Kanban board. In addition, you need to determine who you want to assign new tasks to.

For example, assign tasks to the user that creates the task, the first user to move the task, or a single user. You also have the option to assign new tasks to no one.

Kanban Boards for WordPress Plugin - Settings, Users, Permissions

Once configured, go ahead and click on Save your Settings.

If you scroll down a bit, you will notice the section for creating new users. You can create a user by adding information such as their username, email, and first/last names.

Kanban Boards for WordPress Plugin - Settings, Users, Add User

Once you have entered the information, click on the Add a user button and they will be immediately added to your Kanban board.

Configure Your Statuses Settings

Next, under the Statuses tab, you will customize your Kanban board in terms of column title, color, WIP, and whether to auto-archive.

Kanban Boards for WordPress Plugin - Settings, Statuses

WIP or Work in Progress, is the allotted number of tasks in each column on your Kanban board. By pre-setting how many WIPs you want allowed per column, you prevent bottlenecking of work into one column and keep the workflow moving smoother.

For instance, if you would only like 3 new To Do tasks assigned at any one time, then you would configure that column’s WIP to be 3. Until one of those tasks is moved to the next column on the Kanban board, no one will be allowed to add another To Do task to that column.

Kanban Boards for WordPress Plugin - Settings, Statuses, WIP

Once you are done, click on Save your Settings.

Configure Your Estimates Settings

Lastly, under the Estimates tab, you will decide the set points users will be allowed to choose from when deciding how long a particular task will take.

For instance, the default estimate settings include 2 hours, 4 hours, 1 day, 2 days, and 4 days.

Kanban Boards for WordPress Plugin - Settings, Estimates

You can, however, change those estimates to whatever you want. You can also add another estimate by selecting Add another estimate.

Keep in mind, all estimates you define will show in your Kanban board in the order they are set.

After making any necessary changes, click on Save your Settings.

Add Tasks to Your Kanban Board

After all of your plugin’s settings have been configured, click on the Go to your board button.

Kanban Boards for WordPress Plugin - My Kanban Board

Since your Kanban board is brand new, it will look very empty at first. That’s because you need to start the workflow process by defining tasks in the To Do column.

Kanban Boards for WordPress Plugin - Define a Task

You will also be able to estimate how long each task will take the assigned user.

Kanban Boards for WordPress Plugin - Define a Task, Estimates

From there, team members assigned tasks will be able to move them into the appropriate column labeled Doing, track the time it takes to complete the tasks, and lastly, move them into the Done column, signaling the task as complete.

We hope this article helped you learn how to easily add a Trello-like Kanban board to your WordPress website. You may also want to see our list of must have WordPress plugins for every website.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook .

The post How to Add a Trello-Like Kanban Board in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

Monday Vision, Daily Outcomes, Friday Reflection for Remote Team Management

Monday Vision, Friday ReflectionMy friend J.D. Meier has an amazing blog called Sources of Insight and he’s written a fantastic book called Getting Results the Agile Way. You can buy his book on Amazon (it’s free on Kindle Unlimited!). I put J.D. up there with David Allen and Stephen Covey except J.D. is undiscovered. For real. If you’ve seen my own live talk on Personal Productivity and Information Overload you know I reference J.D.’s work a lot.

I’ve been a people manager as well as an IC (individual contributor) for a while now, and while I don’t yet have the confidence to tell you I’m a good manager, I can tell you that I’m trying and that I’m introspective about my efforts.

My small team applies J.D.’s technique of “Monday Vision, Daily Outcomes, Friday Reflection” to our own work. As he says, this is the heart of his results system.

The way it works is, on Mondays, you figure out the 3 outcomes you want for the week.  Each day you identify 3 outcomes you want to accomplish.  On Friday, you reflect on 3 things going well and 3 things to improve.  It’s that simple. – J.D. Meier

We are a remote team and we are in three different time zones so the “morning standup” doesn’t really work so well for us. We want a “scrum” style standup, but we’re a team that lives in Email/Slack/Microsoft Teams/Skype.

Here’s how Monday Vision works for us as a team. We are transparent about what we’re working on and we are honest about what works and when we stumble.

  • On Monday morning each of us emails the team with:
    • What we hope to accomplish this week. Usually 3-5 things.
    • This isn’t a complete list of everything on our minds. It’s just enough to give context and a vector/direction.

It’s important that we are clear on what our goals are. What would it take for this week to be amazing? What kinds of things are standing in our way? As a manager I think my job is primarily as traffic cop and support. My job is to get stuff out of my team’s way. That might be paperwork, other teams, technical stuff, whatever is keeping them out of their flow.

These emails might be as simple as this (~real) example from a team member.

Last Week:

  • DevIntersection Conference
    • Workshop and 2 sessions
  • Got approval from Hunter for new JavaScript functionality

This Week:

  • Trip Report, Expenses, and general administrivia from the event last week
  • Final planning for MVP Summit
  • Spring Planning for ASP.NET Web Forms, IIS Express, EF4, WCF, and more 
  • Modern ASP.NET Web Forms research paper
  • Thursday evening – presenting over Skype to the London.NET user-group “Introduction to Microservices in ASP.NET Core”

Again, the lengths and amount of detail vary. Here’s the challenge part though – and my team hasn’t nailed this yet and that’s mostly my fault – Friday Reflection. I have an appointment on my calendar for Friday at 4:30pm to Reflect. This is literally blocked out time to look back and ask these questions….

  • On Friday evening on the way out, email the team with:
    • What worked this week? Why didn’t Project Foo get done? Was the problem technical? Logistical? Organizational?
    • Did you feel amazing about this week? Why? Why not? How can we make next week feel better?

What do you do to kick off and close down your week?

Related J.D. Meier productivity reading


Sponsor: Big thanks to Raygun! Join 40,000+ developers who monitor their apps with Raygun. Understand the root cause of errors, crashes and performance issues in your software applications. Installs in minutes, try it today!


© 2016 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Monday Vision, Friday ReflectionMy friend J.D. Meier has an amazing blog called Sources of Insight and he's written a fantastic book called Getting Results the Agile Way. You can buy his book on Amazon (it's free on Kindle Unlimited!). I put J.D. up there with David Allen and Stephen Covey except J.D. is undiscovered. For real. If you've seen my own live talk on Personal Productivity and Information Overload you know I reference J.D.'s work a lot.

I've been a people manager as well as an IC (individual contributor) for a while now, and while I don't yet have the confidence to tell you I'm a good manager, I can tell you that I'm trying and that I'm introspective about my efforts.

My small team applies J.D.'s technique of "Monday Vision, Daily Outcomes, Friday Reflection" to our own work. As he says, this is the heart of his results system.

The way it works is, on Mondays, you figure out the 3 outcomes you want for the week.  Each day you identify 3 outcomes you want to accomplish.  On Friday, you reflect on 3 things going well and 3 things to improve.  It’s that simple. - J.D. Meier

We are a remote team and we are in three different time zones so the "morning standup" doesn't really work so well for us. We want a "scrum" style standup, but we're a team that lives in Email/Slack/Microsoft Teams/Skype.

Here's how Monday Vision works for us as a team. We are transparent about what we're working on and we are honest about what works and when we stumble.

  • On Monday morning each of us emails the team with:
    • What we hope to accomplish this week. Usually 3-5 things.
    • This isn't a complete list of everything on our minds. It's just enough to give context and a vector/direction.

It's important that we are clear on what our goals are. What would it take for this week to be amazing? What kinds of things are standing in our way? As a manager I think my job is primarily as traffic cop and support. My job is to get stuff out of my team's way. That might be paperwork, other teams, technical stuff, whatever is keeping them out of their flow.

These emails might be as simple as this (~real) example from a team member.

Last Week:

  • DevIntersection Conference
    • Workshop and 2 sessions
  • Got approval from Hunter for new JavaScript functionality

This Week:

  • Trip Report, Expenses, and general administrivia from the event last week
  • Final planning for MVP Summit
  • Spring Planning for ASP.NET Web Forms, IIS Express, EF4, WCF, and more 
  • Modern ASP.NET Web Forms research paper
  • Thursday evening – presenting over Skype to the London.NET user-group “Introduction to Microservices in ASP.NET Core”

Again, the lengths and amount of detail vary. Here's the challenge part though - and my team hasn't nailed this yet and that's mostly my fault - Friday Reflection. I have an appointment on my calendar for Friday at 4:30pm to Reflect. This is literally blocked out time to look back and ask these questions....

  • On Friday evening on the way out, email the team with:
    • What worked this week? Why didn't Project Foo get done? Was the problem technical? Logistical? Organizational?
    • Did you feel amazing about this week? Why? Why not? How can we make next week feel better?

What do you do to kick off and close down your week?

Related J.D. Meier productivity reading


Sponsor: Big thanks to Raygun! Join 40,000+ developers who monitor their apps with Raygun. Understand the root cause of errors, crashes and performance issues in your software applications. Installs in minutes, try it today!


© 2016 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Optimize for Tiny Victories

image

I was talking with Dawn C. Hayes, a maker and occasional adjunct processor in NYC earlier this week. We were talking about things like motivation and things like biting off more than we can chew when it comes to large projects, as well as estimating how long something will take. She mentioned that it’s important to optimize for quick early successes, like getting a student to have an “I got the LED to light up” moment. With today’s short attention span internet, you can see that’s totally true. Every programming language has a “5 min quick start” dedicated to giving you some sense of accomplishment quickly. But she also pointed out that after the LED Moment students (and everyone ever, says me) always underestimate how long stuff will take. It’s easy to describe a project in a few sentences but it might take months or a year to make it a reality.

This is my challenge as well, perhaps it’s yours, too. As we talked, I realized that I developed a technique for managing this without realizing it.

I optimize my workflow for lots of tiny victories.

For example, my son and I are working on 3D printing a quadcopter drone. I have no idea what I’m doing, I have no drone experience, and I’m mediocre with electronics. Not to mention I’m dealing with a 7 year old who wants to know why it hasn’t taken off yet, forgetting that we just had the idea a minute ago.

I’m mentally breaking it up in work sprints, little dependencies, but in order to stay motivated we’re making sure each sprint – whether it’s a day or an hour – is a victory as well as a sprint. What can we do to not just move the ball forward but also achieve something. Something small, to be clear. But something we can be excited about, something we can tell mommy about, something we can feel good about.

We’re attempting to make a freaking quadcopter and it’s very possible we won’t succeed. But we soldered two wires together today, and the muiltimeter needle moved, so we’re pretty excited about that tiny victory and that’s how we’re telling the story. It will keep us going until tomorrow’s sprint.

Do you do this too? Tell us in the comments.


Sponsor: Big thanks to my friends at Raygun for sponsoring the feed this week. Only 16% of people will try a failing app more than twice. Raygun offers real-time error and crash reporting for your web and mobile apps that you can set up in minutes. Find out more and get started for free here.


© 2015 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     
image

I was talking with Dawn C. Hayes, a maker and occasional adjunct processor in NYC earlier this week. We were talking about things like motivation and things like biting off more than we can chew when it comes to large projects, as well as estimating how long something will take. She mentioned that it's important to optimize for quick early successes, like getting a student to have an "I got the LED to light up" moment. With today's short attention span internet, you can see that's totally true. Every programming language has a "5 min quick start" dedicated to giving you some sense of accomplishment quickly. But she also pointed out that after the LED Moment students (and everyone ever, says me) always underestimate how long stuff will take. It's easy to describe a project in a few sentences but it might take months or a year to make it a reality.

This is my challenge as well, perhaps it's yours, too. As we talked, I realized that I developed a technique for managing this without realizing it.

I optimize my workflow for lots of tiny victories.

For example, my son and I are working on 3D printing a quadcopter drone. I have no idea what I'm doing, I have no drone experience, and I'm mediocre with electronics. Not to mention I'm dealing with a 7 year old who wants to know why it hasn't taken off yet, forgetting that we just had the idea a minute ago.

I'm mentally breaking it up in work sprints, little dependencies, but in order to stay motivated we're making sure each sprint - whether it's a day or an hour - is a victory as well as a sprint. What can we do to not just move the ball forward but also achieve something. Something small, to be clear. But something we can be excited about, something we can tell mommy about, something we can feel good about.

We're attempting to make a freaking quadcopter and it's very possible we won't succeed. But we soldered two wires together today, and the muiltimeter needle moved, so we're pretty excited about that tiny victory and that's how we're telling the story. It will keep us going until tomorrow's sprint.

Do you do this too? Tell us in the comments.


Sponsor: Big thanks to my friends at Raygun for sponsoring the feed this week. Only 16% of people will try a failing app more than twice. Raygun offers real-time error and crash reporting for your web and mobile apps that you can set up in minutes. Find out more and get started for free here.


© 2015 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Totally stressed out? Sync to Paper

Messy Moleskine photo by Alexandre Dulaunoy and used under Creative Commons

One of the things I often talk about when I give presentations on Personal Productivity is that more people should Sync To Paper. I first had this idea in 2006 while working on a completely overwhelming project at my last job. I was already deeply into using OneNote, which was rather new at the time, so I was putting everything onto my laptop. I was convinced that my unorganized brain could “get organized” if I just wrote everything down in some cloud-based text file.

The problem is, at least for me, is that there isn’t a great way to see the big picture when you’ve just got pixels to look at. Life is much higher resolution than I think folks realize. I’m frankly surprised that so many of you can feel organized and productive on those 11″ laptops. What a tiny window into your life!

Anyway, when I was working on this huge project the database was extremely complex. Hundreds of tables and relationships to manage. It was far too much for anyone to keep in their heads or view on a screen. So they turned to the plotter. Remember those? The database team would print out massive posters and hang them on the wall. They’d stand together in front of them and stare and think.

You see syncing to paper a lot with user interface/user experience teams (UI/UX). We’ll wallpaper entire hallways with mockups of what the system should look like, putting them in high traffic areas so everyone can absorb them and collaborate.

When my life is overwhelming and I am at PEAK STRESS, I do a three things.

  • I get a haircut, because at least I got that handled.
  • I clean my office, so I’m not reminded of the chaos of my life by the chaos of clutter around me.
  • And I sync to paper. I get a Moleskine notebook (Here’s how to pronounce Moleskine, BTW) and I find a clear page and I write down what’s stressing me out. I sync all my devices to paper. Calendars, Todos, thoughts, life, to paper.

The physicality of it is very satisfying in a visceral way. I’ve tried to do the same on a Surface or iPad with a stylus, but it doesn’t work for me. The removal of technology and the scratch of a good quality pen on paper (I use a space pen) is very cathartic. Often I’m working on solving a technical problem so stepping away from tech is as important as the paper. It’s a forced context switch. Even more, as a kinesthetic learner I feel like the moving of my hands differently, even if I never refer to the written notes again, the process helps cement the issues.

True Story: If you watch the Microsoft BUILD Keynote (a big deal, in tech circles) you’ll see me come out for my 15 minute demo holding my Moleskine notebook. No one else does this. In fact, they tease me a little about my notebook. In fact, I’m usually given a 30 page typed script to memorize. It includes screenshots, talking points, gotchas, demo instructions, passwords, all the stuff I need for my demo. Folks work on these scripts for weeks and then deliver them to me. It’s VERY stressful for everyone. We sit together for days and go over these huge documents and I freak out and panic and then get out my Moleskine and synthesize 30 pages into one. Here’s what I took on stage with me for the BUILD 2015 keynote. Insane isn’t it? But without it I would have freaked out. Now the stage crew knows me as “the guy with the notebook.” And yes, I know my handwriting sucks and that this is an unintelligible pile. It still worked, and worked well. 😉

I have horrible handwriting

When I’m completely a mess OR I’m trying to get my head around a large problem, I’ll cover the floor with paper, or find a wall or large whiteboard and try to work it out.

We focus on touchscreen and pinch gestures a lot these days, but for me “zoom out” means literally and figuratively taking a step back from a piece of paper and trying to absorb the big picture.

Paper is the cheapest retina display you’ll ever use. Give it a try, at least until I can afford a Surface Hub for my office. 😉

Microsoft Surface Hub

Do you sync to paper? How does it work for you?

UPDATE: I was pointed to a post from Robert Greiner who promotes the same idea! Great minds think alike. I encourage you to also read his thoughts on the concept, as they are different from mine. He likes the temporary aspect of paper, and the pain of writing as ways to keep one focused.

Related Links

* Messy Moleskine photo by Alexandre Dulaunoy and used under Creative Commons


© 2015 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     
Messy Moleskine photo by Alexandre Dulaunoy and used under Creative Commons

One of the things I often talk about when I give presentations on Personal Productivity is that more people should Sync To Paper. I first had this idea in 2006 while working on a completely overwhelming project at my last job. I was already deeply into using OneNote, which was rather new at the time, so I was putting everything onto my laptop. I was convinced that my unorganized brain could "get organized" if I just wrote everything down in some cloud-based text file.

The problem is, at least for me, is that there isn't a great way to see the big picture when you've just got pixels to look at. Life is much higher resolution than I think folks realize. I'm frankly surprised that so many of you can feel organized and productive on those 11" laptops. What a tiny window into your life!

Anyway, when I was working on this huge project the database was extremely complex. Hundreds of tables and relationships to manage. It was far too much for anyone to keep in their heads or view on a screen. So they turned to the plotter. Remember those? The database team would print out massive posters and hang them on the wall. They'd stand together in front of them and stare and think.

You see syncing to paper a lot with user interface/user experience teams (UI/UX). We'll wallpaper entire hallways with mockups of what the system should look like, putting them in high traffic areas so everyone can absorb them and collaborate.

When my life is overwhelming and I am at PEAK STRESS, I do a three things.

  • I get a haircut, because at least I got that handled.
  • I clean my office, so I'm not reminded of the chaos of my life by the chaos of clutter around me.
  • And I sync to paper. I get a Moleskine notebook (Here's how to pronounce Moleskine, BTW) and I find a clear page and I write down what's stressing me out. I sync all my devices to paper. Calendars, Todos, thoughts, life, to paper.

The physicality of it is very satisfying in a visceral way. I've tried to do the same on a Surface or iPad with a stylus, but it doesn't work for me. The removal of technology and the scratch of a good quality pen on paper (I use a space pen) is very cathartic. Often I'm working on solving a technical problem so stepping away from tech is as important as the paper. It's a forced context switch. Even more, as a kinesthetic learner I feel like the moving of my hands differently, even if I never refer to the written notes again, the process helps cement the issues.

True Story: If you watch the Microsoft BUILD Keynote (a big deal, in tech circles) you'll see me come out for my 15 minute demo holding my Moleskine notebook. No one else does this. In fact, they tease me a little about my notebook. In fact, I'm usually given a 30 page typed script to memorize. It includes screenshots, talking points, gotchas, demo instructions, passwords, all the stuff I need for my demo. Folks work on these scripts for weeks and then deliver them to me. It's VERY stressful for everyone. We sit together for days and go over these huge documents and I freak out and panic and then get out my Moleskine and synthesize 30 pages into one. Here's what I took on stage with me for the BUILD 2015 keynote. Insane isn't it? But without it I would have freaked out. Now the stage crew knows me as "the guy with the notebook." And yes, I know my handwriting sucks and that this is an unintelligible pile. It still worked, and worked well. ;)

I have horrible handwriting

When I'm completely a mess OR I'm trying to get my head around a large problem, I'll cover the floor with paper, or find a wall or large whiteboard and try to work it out.

We focus on touchscreen and pinch gestures a lot these days, but for me "zoom out" means literally and figuratively taking a step back from a piece of paper and trying to absorb the big picture.

Paper is the cheapest retina display you'll ever use. Give it a try, at least until I can afford a Surface Hub for my office. ;)

Microsoft Surface Hub

Do you sync to paper? How does it work for you?

UPDATE: I was pointed to a post from Robert Greiner who promotes the same idea! Great minds think alike. I encourage you to also read his thoughts on the concept, as they are different from mine. He likes the temporary aspect of paper, and the pain of writing as ways to keep one focused.

Related Links

* Messy Moleskine photo by Alexandre Dulaunoy and used under Creative Commons



© 2015 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.