Spend less time CD’ing around directories with the PowerShell Z shortcut

Everyone has a trick for moving around their computer faster. It might be a favorite shell, a series of aliases or shortcuts. I like using popd and pushd to quickly go deep into a directory structure and return exactly where I was.

Another fantastic utility is simply called “Z.” There is a shell script for Z at https://github.com/rupa/z that’s for *nix, and there’s a PowerShell Z command (a fork of the original) at https://github.com/vincpa/z.

As you move around your machine at the command line, Z is adding the directories you usually visit to a file, then using that file to give you instant autocomplete so you can get back there FAST.

If you have Windows 10, you can install Z in seconds like this:

C:\> Install-Module z -AllowClobber

Then just add “Import-Module z” to the end of your Profile, usually at $env:USERPROFILE\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Microsoft.PowerShell_profile.ps1

Even better, Z works with pushd, cd, or just “z c:\users\scott” if you like. All those directory changes and moves will be recorded it the Z datafile that is stored in ~\.cdHistory.

What do you think? Do you have a favorite way to move around your file system at the command line?


Sponsor: Get the latest JetBrains Rider preview for .NET Core 2.0 support, Value Tracking and Call Tracking, MSTest runner, new code inspections and refactorings, and the Parallel Stacks view in debugger.


© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Everyone has a trick for moving around their computer faster. It might be a favorite shell, a series of aliases or shortcuts. I like using popd and pushd to quickly go deep into a directory structure and return exactly where I was.

Another fantastic utility is simply called "Z." There is a shell script for Z at https://github.com/rupa/z that's for *nix, and there's a PowerShell Z command (a fork of the original) at https://github.com/vincpa/z.

As you move around your machine at the command line, Z is adding the directories you usually visit to a file, then using that file to give you instant autocomplete so you can get back there FAST.

If you have Windows 10, you can install Z in seconds like this:

C:\> Install-Module z -AllowClobber

Then just add "Import-Module z" to the end of your Profile, usually at $env:USERPROFILE\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Microsoft.PowerShell_profile.ps1

Even better, Z works with pushd, cd, or just "z c:\users\scott" if you like. All those directory changes and moves will be recorded it the Z datafile that is stored in ~\.cdHistory.

What do you think? Do you have a favorite way to move around your file system at the command line?


Sponsor: Get the latest JetBrains Rider preview for .NET Core 2.0 support, Value Tracking and Call Tracking, MSTest runner, new code inspections and refactorings, and the Parallel Stacks view in debugger.


© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Announcing PowerShell on Linux – PowerShell is Open Source!

I started doing PowerShell almost 10 years ago. Check out this video from 2007 of me learning about PowerShell from Jeffrey Snover! I worked in PowerShell for many years and blogged extensively,  ultimately using PowerShell to script the automation and creation of a number of large systems in Retail Online Banks around the world.

Fast forward to today and Microsoft is announcing PowerShell on Linux powered by .NET Core and it’s all open source and hosted at http://GitHub.com/PowerShell/PowerShell.

Holy crap PowerShell on Linux

Jeffrey Snover predicted internally in 2014 that PowerShell would eventually be open sourced but it was the advent of .NET Core and getting .NET Core working on multiple Linux distros that kickstarted the process. If you were paying attention it’s possible you could have predicted this move yourself. Parts of PowerShell have been showing up as open source:

Get PowerShell everywhere

Ok, but where do you GET IT? http://microsoft.com/powershell is the homepage for PowerShell and everything can be found starting from there.

The PowerShell open source project is at https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell and there are alphas for Ubuntu 14.04/16.04, CentOS 7.1, and Mac OS X 10.11.

To be clear, I’m told this is are alpha quality builds as work continues with community support. An official Microsoft-supported “release” will come sometime later.

What’s Possible?

This is my opinion and somewhat educated speculation, but it seems to me that they want to make it so you can manage anything from anywhere. Maybe you’re a Unix person who has some Windows machines (either local or in Azure) that you need to manage. You can use PowerShell from Linux to do that. Maybe you’ve got some bash scripts at your company AND some PowerShell scripts. Use them both, interchangeably.

If you know PowerShell, you’ll be able to use those skills on Linux as well. If you manage a hybrid environment, PowerShell isn’t a replacement for bash but rather another tool in your toolkit. There are lots of shells (not just bash, zsh, but also ruby, python, etc) in the *nix world so PowerShell will be in excellent company.

PowerShell on Windows

Related Links

Be sure to check out the coverage from around the web and lots of blog posts from different perspectives!

Have fun! This open source thing is kind of catching on at Microsoft isn’t it?


Sponsor: Do you deploy the same application multiple times for each of your end customers? The team at Octopus have been trying to take the pain out of multi-tenant deployments. Check out their 3.4 beta release.


© 2016 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

I started doing PowerShell almost 10 years ago. Check out this video from 2007 of me learning about PowerShell from Jeffrey Snover! I worked in PowerShell for many years and blogged extensively,  ultimately using PowerShell to script the automation and creation of a number of large systems in Retail Online Banks around the world.

Fast forward to today and Microsoft is announcing PowerShell on Linux powered by .NET Core and it's all open source and hosted at http://GitHub.com/PowerShell/PowerShell.

Holy crap PowerShell on Linux

Jeffrey Snover predicted internally in 2014 that PowerShell would eventually be open sourced but it was the advent of .NET Core and getting .NET Core working on multiple Linux distros that kickstarted the process. If you were paying attention it's possible you could have predicted this move yourself. Parts of PowerShell have been showing up as open source:

Get PowerShell everywhere

Ok, but where do you GET IT? http://microsoft.com/powershell is the homepage for PowerShell and everything can be found starting from there.

The PowerShell open source project is at https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell and there are alphas for Ubuntu 14.04/16.04, CentOS 7.1, and Mac OS X 10.11.

To be clear, I'm told this is are alpha quality builds as work continues with community support. An official Microsoft-supported "release" will come sometime later.

What's Possible?

This is my opinion and somewhat educated speculation, but it seems to me that they want to make it so you can manage anything from anywhere. Maybe you're a Unix person who has some Windows machines (either local or in Azure) that you need to manage. You can use PowerShell from Linux to do that. Maybe you've got some bash scripts at your company AND some PowerShell scripts. Use them both, interchangeably.

If you know PowerShell, you'll be able to use those skills on Linux as well. If you manage a hybrid environment, PowerShell isn't a replacement for bash but rather another tool in your toolkit. There are lots of shells (not just bash, zsh, but also ruby, python, etc) in the *nix world so PowerShell will be in excellent company.

PowerShell on Windows

Related Links

Be sure to check out the coverage from around the web and lots of blog posts from different perspectives!

Have fun! This open source thing is kind of catching on at Microsoft isn't it?


Sponsor: Do you deploy the same application multiple times for each of your end customers? The team at Octopus have been trying to take the pain out of multi-tenant deployments. Check out their 3.4 beta release.



© 2016 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.