How to Fix ‘Another Update in Process’ Error in WordPress

Are you seeing “Another update currently in process” error on your WordPress site. This error stops you from updating WordPress. Normally, it should automatically go away. But if it doesn’t, then there is an easy fix for that. In this article, we will show you… Read More »

The post How to Fix ‘Another Update in Process’ Error in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

Are you seeing “Another update currently in process” error on your WordPress site. This error stops you from updating WordPress. Normally, it should automatically go away. But if it doesn’t, then there is an easy fix for that. In this article, we will show you how to fix ‘Another update currently in process’ error in WordPress.

Fixing another update in process error in WordPresas

Why ‘Another Update in Process’ Error Occurs?

This message usually appears when a core WordPress update is running in the background and a user tries to initiate another update process.

During the core update process, WordPress automatically sets an update lock option in the database. This database option prevents your from running simultaneous updates on your website.

Another update in process message

This message is set to automatically disappear in 15 minutes or when the update process has finished. However, if you are stuck on that message or don’t want to wait, then you can manually reset it.

Let’s take a look at how to fix ‘Another update currently in process’ error in WordPress.

Fixing Another Update in Process Error

To quickly get rid of ‘another update in process’ message, you need to delete the core_updater.lock option from your WordPress database. We will show you how to do that using two different methods. You can choose the one that works best for you.

Method 1: Fix Another Update in Process Error Using a Plugin

First thing you need to do is install and activate the Fix Another Update In Progress plugin. For more details, see our step by step guide on how to install a WordPress plugin.

Upon activation, you need to visit Settings » Fix Another Update In Progress page. If updates on your website are locked, then you will see a message with a button to fix it:

Fix WordPress update lock

Simply click on ‘Fix WordPress Update Lock’ button to continue.

The plugin will the delete the WordPress core update lock option from your database, and you will see a success message like this:

WordPress update lock fixed

Method 2. Manually Fix Another Update in Process

This method requires you to use phpMyAdmin to directly run a query in your WordPress database.

First you need to visit the cPanel dashboard of your WordPress hosting account. Under the database section, click on the phpMyAdmin icon.

phpMyAdmin

Next you need to select your WordPress database in phpMyAdmin. This will show you all the tables inside your WordPress database. You need to click on the Browse button next to the WordPress options table (wp_options).

WordPress options table

This will show you all the rows inside the options table. You need to find the row with the option name ‘core_updater.lock’ and click on the delete button next to it.

Delete core updater lock option

PhpMyAdmin will now delete the row from your WordPress database.

You can switch back to your WordPress website and proceed with updating your WordPress website.

We hope this article helped you fix ‘Another update in process’ error on your WordPress site. You may also want to see our ultimate list of the most common WordPress errors and how to fix them.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post How to Fix ‘Another Update in Process’ Error in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

How to Fix 503 Service Unavailable Error in WordPress

Are you seeing a 503 service unavailable error in WordPress? The problem with the 503 error is that it gives no clues about what’s causing it which makes it extremely frustrating for beginners. In this article, we will show you how to fix the 503… Read More »

The post How to Fix 503 Service Unavailable Error in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

Are you seeing a 503 service unavailable error in WordPress? The problem with the 503 error is that it gives no clues about what’s causing it which makes it extremely frustrating for beginners. In this article, we will show you how to fix the 503 service unavailable error in WordPress.

Fixing 503 service unavailable error in WordPress

What Causes 503 Service Unavailable Error in WordPress?

All WordPress hosting companies offer fixed amount of resources for each hosting account. For websites on shared hosting, this limit cannot handle heavy usage of server resources.

The 503 service unavailable error occurs when your web server is unable to get a proper response from a PHP script. This PHP script could be a WordPress plugin, a theme, or a misbehaving custom code snippet.

If the error is caused by heavy usage, a server glitch, or a DDoS attack, then it could automatically disappear in a few minutes.

However, if it is caused by bad code on your website, then it will keep occurring unless you find and disable the code that’s causing it.

That being said, let’s take a look at how to easily fix 503 service unavailable error in WordPress.

Fixing 503 Service Unavailable Error in WordPress

As we mentioned above that this error is caused when your web server is unable to get a proper response from a PHP script running in the background.

To fix it, we will disable all unnecessary PHP scripts one by one until the error is resolved.

Let’s get started.

Deactivate All WordPress Plugins

All your WordPress plugins are PHP scripts, so first you need to deactivate all your WordPress plugins.

Since you cannot login to your WordPress dashboard due to the 503 error, you will need to connect to your website using a FTP client or File Manager in cPanel. Once connected, go to /wp-content/ folder and rename the plugins folder to plugins-old.

Rename plugins folder

Next, you need to create a new folder and name it plugins.

Now you need to visit your WordPress site to see if this resolved the error.

If it did, then this means a plugin installed on your website was causing the error. The above steps have deactivated all WordPress plugins.

To figure out which plugin was causing the issue, you need to switch back to your FTP client or file manager in cPanel. Next, you need to go to /wp-content/ folder and delete the empty plugins folder.

Delete empty plugins folder

After that you need to rename the plugins-old folder to plugins. This will make all your previously installed plugins available to WordPress. However, these plugins will remain deactivated.

You need to visit the WordPress admin area and then go to the plugins page. You can activate your plugins one by one and visit different pages on your website after activating each plugin. Keep doing that until you find the plugin causing the 503 error.

If this step resolved your issue, then you don’t need to follow rest of the instructions on this page. Otherwise, you can move on to the next step.

Switch to a Default WordPress Theme

If deactivating plugins didn’t resolve the issue, then the next step would be to switch to a default WordPress theme. This will deactivate your current WordPress theme.

First, you need to connect to your WordPress site using an FTP client or File Manager in cPanel. Once connected, go to /wp-content/themes/ folder.

Download your current WordPress theme

Locate your currently active WordPress theme and download it to your computer as backup.

After downloading your theme, you can go ahead and delete it from your website

Now, if you already have a default theme like Twenty Seventeen or Twenty Sixteen installed, then it will be automatically activated. If you don’t, then you can go ahead and install a default theme on your website.

Thoroughly check your website to make sure that 503 service unavailable error is resolved.

Troubleshooting

If both methods fail to resolve the error, then you can take the following steps:

  • Contact your WordPress hosting company because they may be able to pin-point what’s causing the issue.
  • As a last resort, you can reinstall WordPress with a fresh copy.

We hope this article helped you learn how to fix 503 service unavailable error in WordPress. You may also want to see our ultimate list of the most common WordPress errors and how to fix them.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post How to Fix 503 Service Unavailable Error in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

How to Fix 503 Service Unavailable Error in WordPress

Are you seeing a 503 service unavailable error in WordPress? The problem with the 503 error is that it gives no clues about what’s causing it which makes it extremely frustrating for beginners. In this article, we will show you how to fix the 503… Read More »

The post How to Fix 503 Service Unavailable Error in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

Are you seeing a 503 service unavailable error in WordPress? The problem with the 503 error is that it gives no clues about what’s causing it which makes it extremely frustrating for beginners. In this article, we will show you how to fix the 503 service unavailable error in WordPress.

Fixing 503 service unavailable error in WordPress

What Causes 503 Service Unavailable Error in WordPress?

All WordPress hosting companies offer fixed amount of resources for each hosting account. For websites on shared hosting, this limit cannot handle heavy usage of server resources.

The 503 service unavailable error occurs when your web server is unable to get a proper response from a PHP script. This PHP script could be a WordPress plugin, a theme, or a misbehaving custom code snippet.

If the error is caused by heavy usage, a server glitch, or a DDoS attack, then it could automatically disappear in a few minutes.

However, if it is caused by bad code on your website, then it will keep occurring unless you find and disable the code that’s causing it.

That being said, let’s take a look at how to easily fix 503 service unavailable error in WordPress.

Fixing 503 Service Unavailable Error in WordPress

As we mentioned above that this error is caused when your web server is unable to get a proper response from a PHP script running in the background.

To fix it, we will disable all unnecessary PHP scripts one by one until the error is resolved.

Let’s get started.

Deactivate All WordPress Plugins

All your WordPress plugins are PHP scripts, so first you need to deactivate all your WordPress plugins.

Since you cannot login to your WordPress dashboard due to the 503 error, you will need to connect to your website using a FTP client or File Manager in cPanel. Once connected, go to /wp-content/ folder and rename the plugins folder to plugins-old.

Rename plugins folder

Next, you need to create a new folder and name it plugins.

Now you need to visit your WordPress site to see if this resolved the error.

If it did, then this means a plugin installed on your website was causing the error. The above steps have deactivated all WordPress plugins.

To figure out which plugin was causing the issue, you need to switch back to your FTP client or file manager in cPanel. Next, you need to go to /wp-content/ folder and delete the empty plugins folder.

Delete empty plugins folder

After that you need to rename the plugins-old folder to plugins. This will make all your previously installed plugins available to WordPress. However, these plugins will remain deactivated.

You need to visit the WordPress admin area and then go to the plugins page. You can activate your plugins one by one and visit different pages on your website after activating each plugin. Keep doing that until you find the plugin causing the 503 error.

If this step resolved your issue, then you don’t need to follow rest of the instructions on this page. Otherwise, you can move on to the next step.

Switch to a Default WordPress Theme

If deactivating plugins didn’t resolve the issue, then the next step would be to switch to a default WordPress theme. This will deactivate your current WordPress theme.

First, you need to connect to your WordPress site using an FTP client or File Manager in cPanel. Once connected, go to /wp-content/themes/ folder.

Download your current WordPress theme

Locate your currently active WordPress theme and download it to your computer as backup.

After downloading your theme, you can go ahead and delete it from your website

Now, if you already have a default theme like Twenty Seventeen or Twenty Sixteen installed, then it will be automatically activated. If you don’t, then you can go ahead and install a default theme on your website.

Thoroughly check your website to make sure that 503 service unavailable error is resolved.

Troubleshooting

If both methods fail to resolve the error, then you can take the following steps:

  • Contact your WordPress hosting company because they may be able to pin-point what’s causing the issue.
  • As a last resort, you can reinstall WordPress with a fresh copy.

We hope this article helped you learn how to fix 503 service unavailable error in WordPress. You may also want to see our ultimate list of the most common WordPress errors and how to fix them.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post How to Fix 503 Service Unavailable Error in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

How to Fix “Missing a Temporary Folder” Error in WordPress

Are you seeing ‘Missing a temporary folder’ error on your WordPress site? This error makes it impossible to upload images, update themes and plugins, or update WordPress core. In this article, we will show you how to easily fix “Missing a temporary folder” error in… Read More »

The post How to Fix “Missing a Temporary Folder” Error in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

Are you seeing ‘Missing a temporary folder’ error on your WordPress site? This error makes it impossible to upload images, update themes and plugins, or update WordPress core. In this article, we will show you how to easily fix “Missing a temporary folder” error in WordPress.

How to fix 'Missing temporary folder' error in WordPress

What Causes The ‘Missing a Temporary Folder’ Error in WordPress?

This error is caused by incorrect PHP settings on your WordPress hosting environment. There is a specific PHP setting that defines a temporary folder to be used by apps like WordPress to temporarily store data before saving it to the desired location.

WordPress needs access to this temporary folder when you upload an image, install or update a theme or plugin, or update WordPress core.

If the location of this folder is not defined in your server’s PHP configuration, then WordPress will be unable to do any of these things and will show you ‘Missing a temporary folder’ error.

Missing temporary folder error

Having said that, let’s see how to easily fix the ‘Missing a temporary folder’ error in WordPress.

Fix Missing Temporary Folder Error in WordPress

For this tutorial, you will need to edit wp-config.php file in WordPress. If you haven’t done this before, then please see our guide on how to edit wp-config.php file in WordPress.

First, you will need to connect to your website using an FTP client or File Manager in cPanel dashboard of your hosting account.

Next, you will need to locate the wp-config.php file and edit it.

Editing wp-config.php file using an FTP client

You need to paste this code to the file just before the line that says ‘That’s all, stop editing! Happy blogging’.

define('WP_TEMP_DIR', dirname(__FILE__) . '/wp-content/temp/');

Save your changes and upload the wp-config.php file back to your website.

Next, you need to go to /wp-content/ folder and create a new folder inside it. You need to name this new folder temp.

Creating temp folder

That’s all, you can now visit your WordPress admin area and try uploading an image.

Troubleshooting

If this method doesn’t work, then check the directory permissions for your wp-content folder.

Note: This error is caused by poorly configured hosting environment. The solution described above is just a workaround. You should still ask your hosting provider to fix this. If they don’t, then you should switch to one of these top WordPress hosting companies.

We hope this article helped you fix the ‘Missing a temporary folder’ error in WordPress. You may also want to bookmark our ultimate list of the most common WordPress errors and how to fix them.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post How to Fix “Missing a Temporary Folder” Error in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

How to Fix Pluggable.php File Errors in WordPress

Are you seeing a pluggable.php file error on your WordPress site? Sometimes when you add a code snippet on your site or activate a new plugin, you may get the pluggable.php file error. In this article, we will show you how to fix pluggable.php file… Read More »

The post How to Fix Pluggable.php File Errors in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

Are you seeing a pluggable.php file error on your WordPress site? Sometimes when you add a code snippet on your site or activate a new plugin, you may get the pluggable.php file error. In this article, we will show you how to fix pluggable.php file errors in WordPress.

Fix errors in pluggable.php file in WordPress

When and Why You See Pluggable.php Errors?

WordPress allow users and plugins to override certain core functions. These functions are located in the pluggable.php file.

If a WordPress plugin or a custom code snippet fails to correctly handle one of these functions, then you will see an error like this one:

Warning: Cannot modify header information – headers already sent by (output started at /home/username/demosite/wp-content/themes/mytheme/functions.php:1035) in /home/username/demosite/wp-includes/pluggable.php on line 1179

Example of an error in WordPress mentioning pluggable.php file

Sometimes you may be able to continue working on your site with this or some other error still appearing in the admin area.

Error in WordPress admin area

Having said that, let’s take a look at how to easily fix pluggable.php file error in WordPress.

Fixing Pluggable.php File Errors in WordPress

The pluggable.php file is a core WordPress file. It’s never a good idea to edit the core WordPress file as your first option, even when there is an error pointing to them.

Most likely than not, the error is coming from a different location.

In order to fix any error mentioning pluggable.php file, just look at the first location mentioned in the error.

Warning: Cannot modify header information – headers already sent by (output started at /home/username/demosite/wp-content/themes/mytheme/functions.php:1035) in /home/username/demosite/wp-includes/pluggable.php on line 1179

In the above example, the error is located in the theme’s functions.php file at line 1035.

This means you need to edit your theme’s functions.php file and change or remove the code causing this error.

Let’s take a look at another example:

Warning: Cannot modify header information – headers already sent by (output started at /home/username/demosite/wp-content/plugins/some-plugin-name/some-plugin.php:144) in /home/username/demosite/wp-includes/pluggable.php on line 1090

This error message is pointing to a plugin on your WordPress site causing the error. You can simply deactivate the plugin and notify the plugin author about the error.

In almost all cases, errors mentioning pluggable.php file are not caused by the file itself.

These errors are usually caused by a custom code snippet you added to functions.php file, or a poorly coded plugin, or even your WordPress theme.

Simply removing or editing the code or deactivating the plugin will make the error go away.

Still can’t figure out what’s causing these errors?

Follow instructions in our step by step guide for troubleshooting WordPress errors. It will help you find out the cause of the error and how to quickly fix it.

We hope this article helped you resolve pluggable.php file errors in WordPress. You may also want to bookmark our list of most common WordPress errors and how to fix them.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post How to Fix Pluggable.php File Errors in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

25 Most Common WordPress Errors and How to Fix Them

While WordPress is really easy to use, there are some common WordPress errors that can make you panic. The good thing is that the WordPress error you are seeing on your site is most likely been reported and resolved by someone before you. At WPBeginner,… Read More »

The post 25 Most Common WordPress Errors and How to Fix Them appeared first on WPBeginner.

While WordPress is really easy to use, there are some common WordPress errors that can make you panic. The good thing is that the WordPress error you are seeing on your site is most likely been reported and resolved by someone before you. At WPBeginner, we have written tutorials on how to fix several popular WordPress errors. In this article, we will cover the 25 most common WordPress errors along with showing you how to fix all of these common WordPress errors.

 Common WordPress Errors and How to Fix Them

Important: Before trying to fix any WordPress error, make sure that you have a complete WordPress backup. You can use BackupBuddy or use this tutorial to manually create a WordPress backup.

In case you are unable to resolve your issue from the steps mentioned in this article, then please contact your WordPress hosting company.

Since this is a lengthy article, we have created a table of contents below for easy navigation.

Table of Contents

  1. How to fix internal server error
  2. How to fix syntax error in WordPress
  3. How to fix the error establishing database connection in WordPress
  4. How to fix WordPress white screen of death
  5. How to fix WordPress posts returning 404 error
  6. How to fix sidebar below content error in WordPress
  7. How to fix white text and missing buttons in WordPress visual editor
  8. How to fix WordPress memory exhausted error by increasing PHP memory limit
  9. What to do when you are locked out of WordPress admin area
  10. How to fix WordPress login page refreshing/redirecting issue
  11. How to fix image upload issue in WordPress
  12. How to fix common image issues in WordPress
  13. How to fix “Are you sure you want to do this” error in WordPress
  14. How to fix briefly unavailable for scheduled maintenance error in WordPress
  15. How to fix WordPress not sending email issue
  16. How to fix WordPress RSS feed errors
  17. How to fix 403 forbidden error in WordPress
  18. How to fix error too many redirects issue in WordPress
  19. How to fix “Upload: failed to write file to disk” error in WordPress
  20. How to fix “This site ahead contains harmful programs” error in WordPress
  21. How to fix missed scheduled post error in WordPress
  22. How to fix fatal error: Maximum execution time exceeded in WordPress
  23. How to fix Facebook incorrect thumbnail issue in WordPress
  24. How to fix WordPress keeps logging out problem
  25. Troubleshooting WordPress errors on your own
  26. Let’s take a look at how to solve the most common WordPress errors (one by one).

    1. How to Fix Internal Server Error

    Internal server error

    Perhaps the most confusing WordPress error that a beginner may come across is “Internal Server Error”, or sometimes “500 Internal Server Error”.

    This error usually appears when there is something wrong, but the server is unable to identify where the problem is. Since the error message does not indicate where you should look for the error, it is pretty much up to you to figure this out.

    We have compiled a list of solutions that you can try and one of them will help you resolve it. [Fix internal server error]

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    2. How to Fix Syntax Error in WordPress

    Syntax error in WordPress

    This error usually occurs when you are trying to add code snippets into WordPress and have accidentally missed something or the code has incorrect syntax. This will result into a PHP parse error and you will see a notice like:

    Parse error- syntax error, unexpected $end in /public_html/site1/wp-content/themes/my-theme/functions.php on line 278

    The error message would indicate the unexpected thing found in the code and the location of the script where the error occurred with line number. To fix this issue you will have to correct the syntax. Most of the time it is a missing bracket, or some unexpected character in the code. [Fix syntax error in WordPress]

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    3. How to Fix the Error Establishing a Database Connection in WordPress

    Error establishing database connection

    This error message is clear that your website is unable to connect to the database. However solving this error can be tricky for beginners.

    Usually this occurs when a user has entered or modified their database credentials (database host, database username, and database password) incorrectly. Sometimes your database server could be unresponsive, or your database may have corrupted.

    However, mostly it is incorrect database login credentials. Take a look at common solutions for this problem. [Fix error establishing database connection in WordPress]

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    4. How to Fix the WordPress White Screen of Death

    White screen of death error in WordPress

    This error usually results into a plain white screen with no error message. This makes it the most puzzling because you have no clue where to look and what to fix.

    Most of the time it is caused when a script exhausts PHP memory limit. It can also happen due to a configuration on the server. It is also possible that a user would only see white screen of death on certain sections of their site. [See how to fix WordPress white screen of death]

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    5. How to Fix WordPress Posts Returning 404 Error

    WordPress posts returning 404 error

    The symptoms of this error is that when a user visits a single post on their site they get a 404 page – not found error.

    The user can browse all other sections of their site including the admin area. The most common cause of this issue is permalink settings in WordPress. To solve this issue a user would need to reconfigure their permalinks settings or manually update their rewrite rules. [Fix WordPress posts returning 404 error]

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    6. How to Fix the Sidebar Below Content Error in WordPress

    Sidebar appearing below content

    Another common issue beginners face is when the sidebar appears below the content when it is supposed to appear next to the content. This issue is mostly caused by WordPress themes.

    Sometimes when users are adding code snippets to their site, they may accidentally forget to close an html div tag or add an extra closing div which may result into breaking the theme layout. Another common cause is using disproportionate width in CSS or not clearing float properly. [Fix sidebar appearing below content error in WordPress]

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    7. How to Fix White Text and Missing Buttons in WordPress Visual Editor

    Missing buttons in WordPress TinyMCE visual editor

    Sometimes buttons from WordPress visual editor may disappear or start showing blank white spaces instead of buttons.

    This problem may occur when concatenated JavaScript is not working. It may also caused by missing or corrupt TinyMCE files, or conflict with some other plugin that modifies or extends the TinyMCE shipped with WordPress. [Fix white text and missing buttons in WordPress visual editor]

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    8. Fix: WordPress Memory Exhausted Error – Increase PHP Memory

    Memory size error

    Indications of this error could be a white screen of death, or an error message like this one:

    Fatal error: Allowed memory size of 33554432 bytes exhausted (tried to allocate 2348617 bytes) in /home/username/public_html/site1/wp-includes/plugin.php on line xxx

    This error occurs when a WordPress script or a plugin exhausts the default allocated memory size limit. [Fix WordPress memory exhausted error]

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    9. What To Do When You Are Locked Out of WordPress Admin (wp-admin)

    Locked out of WordPress admin area

    Sometimes you may find yourself locked out of the WordPress admin area. This could happen if you forgot your password and don’t have to access to password recovery email.

    A plugin or code that incorrectly tries to make some changes into admin section can also lock you out. You may also lose access to admin area due to a hacked WordPress site. [Fix locked out of WordPress admin issue]

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    10. How to Fix WordPress Login Page Refreshing and Redirecting Issue

    WordPress login redirect error

    Symptoms of this issue are that when a user attempts to login to the WordPress dashboard, they are redirected by WordPress back to the login page.

    Most of the time it happens due to incorrect values for site url and home url fields in WordPress options table. It can also be caused by poorly configured permalink settings or redirects setup in the .htaccess file. [Fix WordPress login page refreshing and redirecting issue]

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    11. How to Fix Image Upload Issue in WordPress

    WordPress image upload issues

    Sometimes a user would suddenly notice that all the images from their site are gone and are showing broken image placeholders. When the user tries to upload an image to a post using the media uploader, it results into an error.

    All these files in the media library will appear as broken. This error occurs due to incorrect file and directory permissions in a WordPress installation. A number of factors may cause this issue. [Fix image upload issues in WordPress]

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    12. How to Fix Common Image Issues in WordPress

    Common image issues in WordPress

    Uploading images to a WordPress site can be confusing for someone new to WordPress. A user may be unable to find out how to align images, resize or crop them, or display them in a gallery format.

    This is not an error or issue in WordPress. You just need to familiarize yourself with how WordPress handles media. [Fix common image issues in WordPress]

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    13. How to Fix “Are You Sure You Want to Do This” Error in WordPress

    Are you sure you want to do this error in WordPress

    Users may come across this error in WordPress admin area. The most common cause of this error is a plugin or theme failing to use Nonce properly.

    Nonce are special security keys which may be appended to URLs when performing an admin action in WordPress. Sometimes a plugin or theme may use it incorrectly which may result into users seeing this error. [Fix are you sure you want to do this error in WordPress]

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    14. How to Fix Briefly Unavailable for Scheduled Maintenance Error in WordPress

    WordPress unavailable for maintenance error

    Sometimes due to an unfinished or interrupted WordPress update, you might see “Briefly Unavailable for Scheduled Maintenance” error in WordPress.

    What happens there is that WordPress puts your site in maintenance mode during an update. If for some reason the update is interrupted, then WordPress does not get the chance to put your site out of the maintenance mode. This error would lock down your entire site and make it unavailable for admins as well as visitors. [Fix briefly unavailable for scheduled maintenance error]

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    15. How to Fix WordPress Not Sending Email Issue

    Fixing WordPress not sending email issue

    The most common symptom of this problem is not receiving any contact form or WordPress notification emails from your site.

    This issue is usually caused because most shared hosting providers disable or limit the module used for sending emails to prevent their servers from abuse. [Fix WordPress not sending email issue]

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    16. How to Fix WordPress RSS Feed Errors

    Fixing RSS feed errors in WordPress

    Most WordPress RSS feed errors are caused by poor formatting. You may see errors like these:

    XML Parsing Error: XML or text declaration not at start of entity
    Location: http://example.com/feed
    Line Number 2, Column 1:

    Depending on what browser you are using, your RSS feed error message may vary. You can also see this error message when visiting your feed in a browser.

    Warning: Cannot modify header information – headers already sent by (output started at /home/username/example.com/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php:433) in /home/username/example.com/wp-includes/pluggable.php on line 1228

    WordPress outputs RSS feeds in XML which is a strict markup language. A missing line break or an extra tab can break your RSS feed. [Fix WordPress RSS feed errors]

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    17. How to Fix 403 Forbidden Error in WordPress

    403 Forbidden error

    403 Forbidden error code is shown when your server permissions don’t allow access to a specific page. This is why the error is usually accompanied by the text:

    403 Forbidden – You don’t have permission to access ‘/’ on this server.
    Additionally, a 403 Forbidden error was encountered while trying to use an ErrorDocument to handle the request.

    There are different scenarios when you can see this error. Incorrect file permissions, poorly coded security plugins, or server configuration are the most common culprits. [Fix 403 Forbidden error in WordPress]

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    18. How to Fix Error Too Many Redirects Issue in WordPress

    Too many redirects error in WordPress

    This error usually occurs due to a misconfigured redirection issue. As you know that WordPress has SEO friendly URL Structure which uses the redirect function. Several other popular WordPress plugins also use the redirect functionality as well.

    Due to a misconfiguration in any of these redirection tools, your site may end up redirecting users to a URL that is actually redirecting them back to the referring URL. In that case the user’s browser is trapped between two pages causing a redirect loop. [Fix too many redirects issue in WordPress]

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    19. How to Fix “Upload: Failed to Write File to Disk” Error in WordPress

    Upload failed error in WordPress

    This error can occur due to a number of reasons. However, the most common one is incorrect folder permissions.

    Each file and folder on your website has a set of permissions. Your web server controls access to the files based on these permissions. Incorrect permissions to a folder can take away your ability to write files on server. This means your web server cannot create or add new files to that particular folder. [Fix Upload: Failed to write file to disk error]

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    20. How to Fix “This site ahead contains harmful programs” Error in WordPress

    Harmful programs error in Google Chrome

    Google marks a website with this warning if they find any suspicious code that could be a malware or trojan. Sometimes the reason for this is that your website is hacked and is now used to distribute malicious code.

    Another common reason for this error is showing ads from low quality advertising networks. These networks may sometime display ads linking to websites distributing malicious code. [Fix site ahead contains harmful programs error in WordPress]

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    21. How to Fix the Missed Schedule Post Error in WordPress

    Missed post schedule

    WordPress has this wonderful feature that allows you to schedule posts to be automatically published at a specified time. Most bloggers rely on the future to manage their publishing schedule.

    However, sometimes WordPress can miss scheduled posts due to a number of reasons. If this has happened to you more than a few times then you need to address this issue. [Fix missed schedule post error in WordPress]

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    22. How to Fix Fatal Error: Maximum Execution Time Exceeded in WordPress

    Maximum execution time error in WordPress

    WordPress is coded mainly in PHP programming language. To protect web servers from abuse, there is a time limit set for how long a PHP script can run.

    Some WordPress hosting providers have set this value to a higher level while others may have set it to a lower level. When a script reaches the maximum execution time limit, it results into maximum execution time exceeded error. [Fix maximum execution time exceeded error in WordPress]

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    23. How to Fix Facebook Incorrect Thumbnail Issue in WordPress

    Setting Facebook thumbnail in WordPress using Yoast SEO

    There are many reasons that can prevent Facebook from correctly guessing the right thumbnail image. One of the most common reason is having multiple images set in the og:image tag where your featured image is smaller than rest of the images.

    Facebook uses Open Graph (og) tags, and plugins like Yoast SEO automatically adds them to your site to prevent missing thumbnail issue. [Fix Facebook incorrect thumbnail issue in WordPress]

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    24. How to Fix WordPress Keeps Logging Out Problem

    WordPress keeps logging out

    WordPress sets a cookie in your browser to authenticate a login session. This cookie is set for the WordPress URL stored in your settings section. If you are accessing from a URL that does not match the one in your WordPress settings, then WordPress will not be able to authenticate your session. [Fix WordPress keeps logging out problem]

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    25. Troubleshooting WordPress Errors on Your Own

    We have covered some of the most common WordPress errors in this article. However, the real power of WordPress comes from thousands of plugins and themes that you can use on your site. Any plugin or theme installed on your site can cause errors.

    It could become really hard for beginners to find out what is causing the problem on their site and how they can fix it.

    We have compiled complete step by step guide on troubleshooting WordPress errors for beginners. It will help you learn how to diagnose WordPress issues and how to fix them like a pro.

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    That’s all, we hope that this guide helped you find and fix the WordPress error that you were encountering.

    If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

    The post 25 Most Common WordPress Errors and How to Fix Them appeared first on WPBeginner.

Beginner’s Guide to Troubleshooting WordPress Errors (Step by Step)

Are you encountering a common WordPress error on your site? Do you want to troubleshoot these WordPress errors on your own? Most of these errors can be solved by following easy troubleshooting steps. In this beginner’s guide, we will show you how to troubleshoot WordPress… Read More »

The post Beginner’s Guide to Troubleshooting WordPress Errors (Step by Step) appeared first on WPBeginner.

Are you encountering a common WordPress error on your site? Do you want to troubleshoot these WordPress errors on your own? Most of these errors can be solved by following easy troubleshooting steps. In this beginner’s guide, we will show you how to troubleshoot WordPress errors one step at a time.

Troubleshooting WordPress errors

1. Create a Complete Backup of Your WordPress Site

First thing you should do is to create a complete backup of your WordPress site. If you were already using a WordPress backup plugin, then make sure that you have a recent backup safely stored somewhere.

If you were not using a backup plugin, then you should start using one immediately. However, in case you don’t have access to the admin area of your WordPress site, then you will need to manually backup your database and files.

Backups allow you to restore your WordPress site easily when something goes wrong. They are your first and most important defence against security threats, hacking, and data loss.

2. Deactivate All Plugins Installed on Your Website

Most of the times errors are caused by a plugins conflicting with each other, your theme, or the WordPress core. Deactivating all WordPress plugins on your site will most likely solve the problem. You can then find out which plugin was causing the issue by activating plugins one by one on your site.

If you have access to the admin area of your WordPress site, then simply head over to the plugins page.

Select and deactivate all plugins in WordPress

First you need to select all plugins, and then select ‘Deactivate’ from ‘Bulk Actions’ drop down menu. Click on the Apply button to deactivate all selected plugins.

If you do not have access to the admin area, then you will need to use FTP or phpMyAdmin to deactivate all plugins.

Simply connect to your website using an FTP client. If you haven’t used FTP before, then you may want to see our how to use FTP to upload files to WordPress.

Navigate to the wp-content folder and rename plugins folder to “plugin.deactivate”.

Rename plugins folder using FTP

For more detailed instructions, see our article on how to deactivate all plugins when not able to access wp-admin.

3. Switch to a Default WordPress Theme

Sometimes your WordPress theme can cause issues on your site. You can easily find out if your theme is causing an issue by switching to a default WordPress theme like Twenty Sixteen or Twenty Fifteen.

Head over to Appearance » Themes page and then click on the Activate button next to a default theme.

Switch to a default WordPress theme

However, if you don’t have access to the admin area of your WordPress site, then you will need to use FTP to switch theme.

Connect to your website using an FTP client and then navigate to /wp-content/themes/ folder. Download your current active theme as a backup to your Desktop.

After that you need to delete all themes except a default WordPress theme like TwentySixteen. Since your active theme will no longer be available, WordPress will now automatically switch to using the default theme available.

If your theme was causing the issue, then you should be able to log in to your WordPress site now.

4. Refresh Permalinks

WordPress uses SEO friendly URL structure or Permalinks. Sometimes the permalink structure is not updated or configured properly, which may result in unexpected 404 errors on your site.

You can easily refresh permalinks without changing anything on your WordPress site. Visit Settings » Permalinks page and click on ‘Save Changes’ button without changing anything.

Update permalinks in WordPress

5. Backup and Delete .htaccess File

A corrupt .htaccess file is often the cause of the internal server error.

First you need to connect to your website using an FTP client. The .htaccess file is located in your site’s root directory.

Since it is a hidden file, you may need to force your FTP client to show hidden files. See our article on why you can’t find .htaccess file on your WordPress site

You need to download the .htaccess file to your computer as a backup, and then delete it from your web server.

You can now try to login to your WordPress site and go to Settings » Permalinks page. Click on the Save Changes button to refresh your permalinks and to regenerate a new .htaccess file for your site.

6. Fix WordPress Site URL

Having incorrect settings for WordPress URL and Site URL options can also cause redirect issues, 404 errors, and some other common issues.

WordPress URL and Site URL options can be changed from admin area by visiting Settings » General page.

Changing WordPress Address and Site Address options from admin area

Make sure that both URLs are exactly the same.

If you do not have access to the admin area of your WordPress site, then you can change these URLs using FTP. There are two ways to do that using FTP:

Update WordPress URL and Site URL Settings in wp-config.php File

Once connected to your website using an FTP client, locate wp-config.php file. Now you need to edit this file in a text editor like Notepad.

Go to the line that says /* That's all, stop editing! Happy blogging. */, and just before it, add this code:

define('WP_HOME','http://example.com');
define('WP_SITEURL','http://example.com');

Don’t forget to replace example.com with your own domain name. Now save your changes and upload the file back to your server.

Update URLs Using functions.php File

You can also update URLs using your theme’s functions.php file.

Open your FTP client and navigate to /wp-content/themes/ folder. Open your current active theme’s folder and locate functions.php file inside it. Now you will need to edit the functions.php file in a text editor like Notepad.

Simply add these lines at the bottom of the functions file:

update_option( 'siteurl', 'http://example.com' );
update_option( 'home', 'http://example.com' );

Don’t forget to change WordPress URLs from the settings page after you login to your site. Once you have added them on the settings page, you need to delete these lines from your theme’s functions file.

7. Check Reading Settings

If your newly created WordPress site is not indexed by search engines, then this is the first thing that you should do.

Login to your WordPress site and go to Settings » Reading page. Scroll down to the bottom of the page and make sure that the box next to ‘Search Engine Visibility’ is unchecked.

Search engine visibility

This option allows you to discourage search engines from showing your website in search. It is used by webmasters when they are working on a website which is not ready to be live. Sometimes you can accidentally check this setting and forget about it.

Make sure that this option is unchecked when your website is ready to go live.

8. Troubleshooting Email Issues

Many WordPress hosting providers do not have mail settings properly configured. This stops you and your users to receive emails from WordPress.

If you are using a contact form plugin, then you will not be able to receive those emails as well. You will also not receive any WordPress notifications.

See our complete step by step instructions in our article on how to fix WordPress not sending email issue.

9. Scanning for Malware and Backdoors

If you suspect that your WordPress site is affected with malware, then you should scan your website with Sucuri. It is the best website security monitoring service for WordPress site owners.

See our case study of how Sucuri helped us block 450,000 WordPress attacks in 3 months.

For more detailed instructions, see our guide on how to scan your WordPress site for potentially malicious code.

Getting Better Support

After following the above mentioned troubleshooting steps, you would be able to fix many of the most common WordPress errors. However, if the problem persists, then you can seek further support.

WordPress is a community software, so you can get help from the community by posting in WordPress support forums. Here is how to write a better support request:

  • Be polite and nice. No matter how upset or frustrated you are, do not use harsh language.
  • Mention your problem briefly.
  • Describe troubleshooting steps you have taken so far.
  • Uplaod screenshots on a cloud image sharing service, and then add the links in your support thread.

For more on this topic, take a look at our guide on how to properly ask for WordPress support and get it.

We hope this article helped you learn how to troubleshoot WordPress errors. You may also want to see our list of 14 most common WordPress errors and how to fix them.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post Beginner’s Guide to Troubleshooting WordPress Errors (Step by Step) appeared first on WPBeginner.

How to Fix “Googlebot cannot access CSS and JS files” Error in WordPress

Are you seeing ‘Googlebot cannot access CSS and JS files’ warning in Google webmaster tools account for your WordPress site? The message contains links to instructions on how to fix this issue, but those instructions are not very easy to follow. In this article, we… Read More »

To leave a comment please visit How to Fix “Googlebot cannot access CSS and JS files” Error in WordPress on WPBeginner.

Are you seeing ‘Googlebot cannot access CSS and JS files’ warning in Google webmaster tools account for your WordPress site? The message contains links to instructions on how to fix this issue, but those instructions are not very easy to follow. In this article, we will show you how to fix “Googlebot cannot access CSS and JS files” error on your WordPress site.

Googlebot Warning

Why Google Needs Access to CSS and JS Files?

Google is focused on giving better rankings to user friendly websites – sites that are fast, have good user experience, etc. In order to determine the user experience of a website, Google needs access to be able to visit the site’s CSS and JavaScript files.

By default WordPress does not block search bots from accessing any CSS or JS files. However some site owners may accidentally block them while trying to add extra security measures or by using a WordPress security plugin.

This restricts Googlebot from indexing CSS and JS files which may affect your site’s SEO performance.

Having said that, let’s see how we can locate these files and unblock them.

How to Give Google Access to Your CSS and JS Files

First you need to know which files Google is unable to access on your website.

You can see how Googlebot sees your website by clicking on Crawl » Fetch as Google in Google Search Console (formerly Webmaster Tools). Next, click on fetch and render button (you want to do this for both Desktop and Mobile).

Fetch and render a page as Googlebot

Once fetched, the result will appear in a row below. Clicking on it will show you what a user sees and what the Googlebot sees when it loads your site.

Fetch as Google Comparison

If you notice any difference between the two screenshots, then this means that Googlebot was not able to access CSS/JS files. It will also show you the links of CSS and JS files it was unable to access.

You can also find a list of these blocked resources under Google Index » Blocked Resources.

Finding blocked resources in Google Search Console

Clicking on each resource will show you the links to actual resources that cannot be accessed by Googlebot.

Most of the time, these are CSS styles and JS files added by your WordPress plugins or theme.

Now you will need to edit your site’s robots.txt file which is what controls what Google bot sees.

You can edit it by connecting to your site using an FTP client. The robots.txt file will be in your site’s root directory.

Locating robots.txt file on a WordPress site using FTP client

If you are using Yoast SEO plugin, then you can edit robots.txt file from within your WordPress admin area. Simply go to SEO » Tools page and then click on File Editor.

Editing robots.txt file using file editor tool in Yoast SEO

You will most likely see that your site has disallowed access to some WordPress directories like this:

User-agent: *
Disallow: /wp-admin/
Disallow: /wp-includes/
Disallow: /wp-content/plugins/
Disallow: /wp-content/themes/

Now you need to remove the lines that are blocking Google’s access to CSS or JS files on your site’s front-end. Typically these files are located in the plugins or themes folders. You may also need to remove wp-includes, many WordPress themes and plugins may call scripts located in wp-includes folder, such as jQuery.

Some users may notice that their robots.txt file is either empty or does not even exist. If Googlebot does not find a robots.txt file, then it automatically crawls and index all files.

Then why are you seeing this warning?

On rare occasions, some WordPress hosting providers may proactively block access to default WordPress folders for bots. You can override this in robots.txt by allowing access to blocked folders.

User-agent: *
Allow: /wp-includes/js/

Once you are done, save your robots.txt file. Visit the fetch as Google tool, and click on fetch and render button. Now compare your fetch results, and you will see that most blocked resources issue should disappear now.

We hope this article helped you resolve ‘Googlebot cannot access CSS and JS files’ files error on your WordPress site. You may also want to see our guide on

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

To leave a comment please visit How to Fix “Googlebot cannot access CSS and JS files” Error in WordPress on WPBeginner.