22 Best WordPress Themes for Universities

Are you looking for the best WordPress theme for universities and colleges? There are plenty of WordPress themes designed for corporate and small businesses, but they are not suitable for an educational organization. In this article, we have hand picked some of the best WordPress… Read More »

The post 22 Best WordPress Themes for Universities appeared first on WPBeginner.

Are you looking for the best WordPress theme for universities and colleges? There are plenty of WordPress themes designed for corporate and small businesses, but they are not suitable for an educational organization. In this article, we have hand picked some of the best WordPress themes for universities and colleges that you can use.

WordPress themes for universities

Building a University or College Website with WordPress

WordPress is used by world’s top universities and colleges. It is easy to set up, open source, and can be easily customized for an educational organization.

However, you need to make sure that you are using the right version of WordPress. A self hosted WordPress.org website gives you complete freedom to use all features of WordPress.

Self hosted WordPress.org website needs a domain name and hosting account. Many large universities have their own servers to host university websites.

However if you are just creating a website for your class, then you can also sign up with a WordPress hosting company. We recommend using Bluehost.

They are one of the largest hosting companies in the world and an officially recommended WordPress hosting provider.

After signing up for a hosting account, you can move on to install WordPress. Follow the instructions in our step by step guide on how to make a website and you will be ready to launch in no time.

That being said, let’s take a look at some of the best WordPress themes to use for a university or college website.

1. Educampus

Educampus

Educampus is a simple WordPress theme for colleges and universities. It features a modern design with a full width slider on the top, which is followed by different sections. It uses beautiful templates for different pages like homepage, a separate blog page, and a contact form page.

Theme setup is quite simple and includes a one-click demo content installer. It also ships with a drag and drop page builder plugin and a premium WordPress slider.

2. EduPro

EduPro

Edu Pro is a WordPress theme designed specifically for educational websites. Its homepage contains a large slider on top with your call to action button. It displays your recent news, courses, and student testimonials in a grid layout.

It includes custom widgets to for recent posts by category and newsletter signup form. It is quite easy to set up with a custom theme options panel and a drag and drop page builder.

3. Lacero

Lacero

Lacero is a modern WordPress theme for universities and college. It comes with a beautiful homepage layout with a large slider on top and beautiful CSS animations as you scroll down the page.

The theme includes beautiful templates for different pages such as courses, events, and about pages. It has custom widgets, shortcodes, testimonials, and comes with a drag and drop page builder to create custom page layouts.

4. Motive

Motive

Motive is a multipurpose WordPress theme. It is designed to be flexible and easily customizable for different kind of websites including colleges and universities.

It comes in 2 different styles and includes powerful features like a premium slider plugin, post formats, sticky navigation, parallax effects, custom post types, and more.

Its modern homepage features a beautiful top slider with call to action buttons. It comes with a custom theme options panel which walks you through the setup process. Inside you’ll also find pricing tables, portfolio template, team members, and contact form.

5. High School

High school

High School is a modern and stylish WordPress theme designed for schools, colleges, and universities. It has a modern homepage featuring a modular layout with graceful animations and engaging presentation.

It includes a custom theme options panel for easier setup. Other features include, Google Maps, custom widgets, sortable gallery, shortcodes, and more.

6. Academia Pro

Academia Pro

Academia Pro is another great WordPress theme for universities and colleges. It features a widgetized 3-column homepage layout with event calendar integration. This widgetized layout can be easily setup with drag and drop custom widgets included in the theme.

There are multiple header styles to choose from with 4 layout choices for your post and pages. It also includes colors for text widgets, custom logo upload, and unlimited color choices. It is WooCommerce ready so you can also add an online store to your college website.

7. ELMS Pro

ELMS Pro

ELMS Pro is a WordPress education theme for colleges and universities. It comes with built-in LMS plugin features including courses, lessons, quizzes, students, and instructor management.

It includes 10 homepage designs, 30 header styles, and 8 layouts for different sections of your website. It ships with a page builder module with custom widgets and page block elements to drag and drop.

8. Ultra

Ultra

Ultra is a powerful multipurpose WordPress theme that ships with multiple ready-made websites that can be installed with 1-click. Each design can be easily customized using its custom theme options panel and an integrated drag and drop buider.

It includes all the features you’d expect to see in a premium WordPress theme like a slider, pricing tables, progress bar, animated counters, and more. It is WooCommerce ready and packed with countless combinations of different layouts, header styles, colors, and design choices.

9. Educate

Educate

Educate is a highly flexible WordPress theme suitable for universities, colleges, and schools. It has an easy to setup homepage layout includes a drag and drop page builder which allows you to create any kind of pages with no coding required.

It also includes several header styles, unlimited colors, unlimited sidebars, icon fonts, Google fonts, custom widgets, and shortcodes. It comes with 1-click demo content importer, a custom theme options panel, and easy customization with live theme customizer.

10. The Core

The Core

The core is a mega theme packed with several ready-made website designs including one for college websites. Each of these designs can be easily installed with 1-click complete with demo content and images. It includes a powerful and easy to use drag and drop builder to customize any page you want or create new layouts.

It has tons of features with unlimited colors, countless design combinations, sliders, Google Maps, mega menus, and beautiful typography. It is translation ready and fully compatible with WooCommerce.

11. Edukado

Edukado

Edukado is designed to be a flexible WordPress education theme for universities and colleges. It comes ready to be used with WooCommerce, LMS, and membership plugins, which allow you to sell online courses.

It includes ready to use templates for courses, course details, shop front, archives, and blog pages. Want to create more landing pages? The theme comes with premium page builder and slider plugins to create stunning layouts.

12. Presence

Presence

Presence is a multipurpose WordPress theme designed for any kind of business websites, non-profits, and universities. It includes 10 ready-made website demos including one for university or college.

It includes 6 pre-defined color schemes, 3 slider styles, 4 blog layouts, full-width and boxed layouts. You can customize anything using the live theme customizer. It is WooCommerce ready and can also be used to create multilingual websites using WPML.

13. College

College

College is a WordPress education theme for schools, colleges, and university websites. It comes with built-in sections to add courses, classes, instructors, staff profiles, and class schedules.

It includes a custom theme options panel with 1-click demo content importer. Other notable features include easy Google Analytics integration, social media buttons, custom logo, unlimited sidebars, and more.

14. Monochrome

Monochrome

If you are looking for minimalist design, then take a look at Monochrome. This excellent WordPress theme is built on the Genesis theme framework. It features a spacious minimalist design that would work for any kind of website you want to build.

This ecommerce ready theme comes with a fully widgetized homepage, custom widgets, and 4 dedicated widget areas. Other features include customizable headers with custom logo support, landing page template, pricing page, and more.

15. Nayma

Nayma

Nayma is a multi-purpose WordPress theme suitable for all kind of websites. It comes with 8 ready-made website designs and each one of them can be easily customized using the drag and drop builder.

It includes modules for photo galleries, sliders, carousel, testimonials, call to action, and more. It is WooCommerce ready and can be used to build multilingual websites.

16. Lenscap

Lenscap

If you are looking for a magazine template for your university or college magazine, then check out Lenscap. It comes with a highly customizable featured content carousel on top, followed by your content categories in a beautiful layout.

It includes an immersive lightbox popup for your video and image galleries. It also has beautiful content discovery features, crisp typography, and full WooCommerce support.

17. Edu Care

Edu Care

If you are looking for a free option, then check out Edu Care. This free WordPress theme is designed specifically for colleges and universities. It features a clean modern layout with a slider on the homepage.

It is easy to setup using the live theme customizer and supports custom backgrounds, headers, multiple sidebars, a separate blog page template, and more. It is WooCommerce ready and can be translated into other languages.

18. Neuton

Neuton

If you are building a content rich website for your university or college magazine, then Neuton will be a great theme for that. It is a magazine style WordPress theme featuring a masonry grid layout.

It comes with highly customizable custom widgets for content discovery features which keep users engaged and increase your pageviews. All theme features can be easily configured using the live theme customizer. Homepage is available in two styles and can be easily setup with widgets.

19. Paperback

Paperback

Paperback is another beautiful WordPress theme suitable for university magazine or content-rich websites. It comes in multiple colors and you can also use your own colors. It has a beautiful featured post carousel on the homepage to showcase your best content on the top.

It also includes category mega menu, showing recent content from categories. It has beautiful typography using Typekit fonts. It is easy to customize, and comes with only the options you’ll actually use.

20. Enlighten

Enlighten

Enlighten is a free WordPress theme for educational institutes. It features homepage sliders, multiple menus, carousel portfolio and service section, video gallery, and more.

It is quite easy to customize as all theme options are available under live customizer. It also includes custom backgrounds, headers, translation ready, and WooCommerce support.

21. Education Pro

Education Pro

Education Pro is another excellent WordPress theme for universities. It is built on Genesis theme framework, so you can rely on its rock solid base for performance and speed. It comes with multiple page templates for default, archives, blog and landing pages.

It has a custom theme options panel and it also supports live theme customizer. Theme homepage has 4 widget ready areas which allows you to just drag and drop widgets to setup homepage.

22. WP Education

WP Education

WP Education is a powerful WordPress theme for educational websites, universities, and online courses. It works well with free LMS plugin which adds course management features to the theme. WP Education is also compatible with WooCommerce and Events Calendar plugin.

It has a modern homepage layout which is easily setup using theme options page. It also includes multiple custom widgets, color choices, and page layouts to choose from. It also includes a child theme for advanced customizations.

We hope this article helped you find the best WordPress themes for universities and colleges. You may also want to see our ultimate step by step WordPress security guide for beginners.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post 22 Best WordPress Themes for Universities appeared first on WPBeginner.

Tabs vs Spaces – A peaceful resolution with EditorConfig in Visual Studio. Plus .NET Extensions!

The culture wars continue. The country is divided with no end in sight. Tabs or spaces? There’s even an insane (IMHO) assertion that the spaces people make more money.

I’m going with Gina Trapani on this one. I choose working code.

@ftrain I choose the 3rd option: working code

— Gina Trapani �� (@ginatrapani) December 27, 2015

Teams can fight but the problem of formatting code across teams is solved by EditorConfig. I’m surprised more people don’t know about it and use it, so this blog post is my small way of getting the word out. TELL THE PEOPLE.

Take a project and make a new .editorconfig file and put this in it. I’ll use a dotnet new console example hello world app.

[*.cs]
indent_style = tab
indent_size = tab
tab_size = 4

I’ve set mine in this example to just *.cs, but you could also say [*.{cs,js}] or just [*] if you like, as well as have multiple sections.

You’ll check this file in WITH your project so that everyone on the team shares the team’s values.

Here in Notepad2 we can see someone has used spaces for whitespace, like a savage. Whitespace appears as pale dots in this editor.

image

I’ll open this project in Visual Studio 2017 which supports the EditorConfig file natively. Notice the warning at the bottom where VS lets me know that this project has conventions that are different than my own.

user preferences for this file type are overwidden by this project's coding conventions

VS Format Document commands will use tabs rather than spaces for this project. Here is the same doc reformatted in VS:

image

At this point I’m comforted that the spaces have been defeated and that cooler heads have prevailed – at least for this project.

.NET Extensions to EditorConfig

Even better, if your editor supports it, you can include “EditorConfig Extensions” for specific files or languages. This way your team can keep things consistent across projects. If you’re familiar with FxCop and StyleCop, this is like those.

There’s a ton of great .NET EditorConfig options you can set to ensure the team uses consistent Language Conventions, Naming Conventions, and Formatting Rules.

  • Language Conventions are rules pertaining to the C# or Visual Basic language, for example, var/explicit type, use expression-bodied member.
  • Formatting Rules are rules regarding the layout and structure of your code in order to make it easier to read, for example, Allman braces, spaces in control blocks.
  • Naming Conventions are rules respecting the way objects are named, for example, async methods must end in “Async”.

You can also set the importance of these rules with things like “suggestion,” or “warning,” or even “error.”

As an example, I’ll set that my team wants predefined types for locals:

dotnet_style_predefined_type_for_locals_parameters_members = true:error

Visual Studio here puts up a lightbulb and the suggested fix because my team would rather I use “string” than the full “System.String.

Visual Studio respects EditorConfig

The excellent editorconfig for .NET docs have a LOT of great options you can use or ignore. Here’s just a FEW (controversial) examples:

  • csharp_new_line_before_open_brace – Do we put open braces at the end of a line, or on their own new line?
  • csharp_new_line_before_members_in_object_initializers – Do we allow A = 3, B = 4, for insist on a new line for each?
  • csharp_indent_case_contents – Do we freakishly line up all our switch/case statements, or do we indent each case like the creator intended?
  • You can even decide on how you Want To Case Things And Oddly Do Sentence Case: pascal_case, camel_case, first_word_upper, all_upper, all_lower

If you’re using Visual Studios 2010, 2012, 2013, or 2015, fear not. There’s at least a basic EditorConfig free extension for you that enforces the basic rules. There is also an extension for Visual Studio Code to support EditorConfig files that takes just seconds to install although I don’t see a C# one for now, just one for whitespace.


Sponsor: Check out JetBrains Rider: a new cross-platform .NET IDE. Edit, refactor, test and debug ASP.NET, .NET Framework, .NET Core, Xamarin or Unity applications. Learn more and download a 30-day trial!


© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

The culture wars continue. The country is divided with no end in sight. Tabs or spaces? There's even an insane (IMHO) assertion that the spaces people make more money.

I'm going with Gina Trapani on this one. I choose working code.

Teams can fight but the problem of formatting code across teams is solved by EditorConfig. I'm surprised more people don't know about it and use it, so this blog post is my small way of getting the word out. TELL THE PEOPLE.

Take a project and make a new .editorconfig file and put this in it. I'll use a dotnet new console example hello world app.

[*.cs]

indent_style = tab
indent_size = tab
tab_size = 4

I've set mine in this example to just *.cs, but you could also say [*.{cs,js}] or just [*] if you like, as well as have multiple sections.

You'll check this file in WITH your project so that everyone on the team shares the team's values.

Here in Notepad2 we can see someone has used spaces for whitespace, like a savage. Whitespace appears as pale dots in this editor.

image

I'll open this project in Visual Studio 2017 which supports the EditorConfig file natively. Notice the warning at the bottom where VS lets me know that this project has conventions that are different than my own.

user preferences for this file type are overwidden by this project's coding conventions

VS Format Document commands will use tabs rather than spaces for this project. Here is the same doc reformatted in VS:

image

At this point I'm comforted that the spaces have been defeated and that cooler heads have prevailed - at least for this project.

.NET Extensions to EditorConfig

Even better, if your editor supports it, you can include "EditorConfig Extensions" for specific files or languages. This way your team can keep things consistent across projects. If you're familiar with FxCop and StyleCop, this is like those.

There's a ton of great .NET EditorConfig options you can set to ensure the team uses consistent Language Conventions, Naming Conventions, and Formatting Rules.

  • Language Conventions are rules pertaining to the C# or Visual Basic language, for example, var/explicit type, use expression-bodied member.
  • Formatting Rules are rules regarding the layout and structure of your code in order to make it easier to read, for example, Allman braces, spaces in control blocks.
  • Naming Conventions are rules respecting the way objects are named, for example, async methods must end in "Async".

You can also set the importance of these rules with things like "suggestion," or "warning," or even "error."

As an example, I'll set that my team wants predefined types for locals:

dotnet_style_predefined_type_for_locals_parameters_members = true:error

Visual Studio here puts up a lightbulb and the suggested fix because my team would rather I use "string" than the full "System.String.

Visual Studio respects EditorConfig

The excellent editorconfig for .NET docs have a LOT of great options you can use or ignore. Here's just a FEW (controversial) examples:

  • csharp_new_line_before_open_brace - Do we put open braces at the end of a line, or on their own new line?
  • csharp_new_line_before_members_in_object_initializers - Do we allow A = 3, B = 4, for insist on a new line for each?
  • csharp_indent_case_contents - Do we freakishly line up all our switch/case statements, or do we indent each case like the creator intended?
  • You can even decide on how you Want To Case Things And Oddly Do Sentence Case: pascal_case, camel_case, first_word_upper, all_upper, all_lower

If you're using Visual Studios 2010, 2012, 2013, or 2015, fear not. There's at least a basic EditorConfig free extension for you that enforces the basic rules. There is also an extension for Visual Studio Code to support EditorConfig files that takes just seconds to install although I don't see a C# one for now, just one for whitespace.


Sponsor: Check out JetBrains Rider: a new cross-platform .NET IDE. Edit, refactor, test and debug ASP.NET, .NET Framework, .NET Core, Xamarin or Unity applications. Learn more and download a 30-day trial!



© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Tabs vs Spaces – A peaceful resolution with EditorConfig in Visual Studio. Plus .NET Extensions!

The culture wars continue. The country is divided with no end in sight. Tabs or spaces? There’s even an insane (IMHO) assertion that the spaces people make more money.

I’m going with Gina Trapani on this one. I choose working code.

@ftrain I choose the 3rd option: working code

— Gina Trapani �� (@ginatrapani) December 27, 2015

Teams can fight but the problem of formatting code across teams is solved by EditorConfig. I’m surprised more people don’t know about it and use it, so this blog post is my small way of getting the word out. TELL THE PEOPLE.

Take a project and make a new .editorconfig file and put this in it. I’ll use a dotnet new console example hello world app.

[*.cs]
indent_style = tab
indent_size = tab
tab_size = 4

I’ve set mine in this example to just *.cs, but you could also say [*.{cs,js}] or just [*] if you like, as well as have multiple sections.

You’ll check this file in WITH your project so that everyone on the team shares the team’s values.

Here in Notepad2 we can see someone has used spaces for whitespace, like a savage. Whitespace appears as pale dots in this editor.

image

I’ll open this project in Visual Studio 2017 which supports the EditorConfig file natively. Notice the warning at the bottom where VS lets me know that this project has conventions that are different than my own.

user preferences for this file type are overwidden by this project's coding conventions

VS Format Document commands will use tabs rather than spaces for this project. Here is the same doc reformatted in VS:

image

At this point I’m comforted that the spaces have been defeated and that cooler heads have prevailed – at least for this project.

.NET Extensions to EditorConfig

Even better, if your editor supports it, you can include “EditorConfig Extensions” for specific files or languages. This way your team can keep things consistent across projects. If you’re familiar with FxCop and StyleCop, this is like those.

There’s a ton of great .NET EditorConfig options you can set to ensure the team uses consistent Language Conventions, Naming Conventions, and Formatting Rules.

  • Language Conventions are rules pertaining to the C# or Visual Basic language, for example, var/explicit type, use expression-bodied member.
  • Formatting Rules are rules regarding the layout and structure of your code in order to make it easier to read, for example, Allman braces, spaces in control blocks.
  • Naming Conventions are rules respecting the way objects are named, for example, async methods must end in “Async”.

You can also set the importance of these rules with things like “suggestion,” or “warning,” or even “error.”

As an example, I’ll set that my team wants predefined types for locals:

dotnet_style_predefined_type_for_locals_parameters_members = true:error

Visual Studio here puts up a lightbulb and the suggested fix because my team would rather I use “string” than the full “System.String.

Visual Studio respects EditorConfig

The excellent editorconfig for .NET docs have a LOT of great options you can use or ignore. Here’s just a FEW (controversial) examples:

  • csharp_new_line_before_open_brace – Do we put open braces at the end of a line, or on their own new line?
  • csharp_new_line_before_members_in_object_initializers – Do we allow A = 3, B = 4, for insist on a new line for each?
  • csharp_indent_case_contents – Do we freakishly line up all our switch/case statements, or do we indent each case like the creator intended?
  • You can even decide on how you Want To Case Things And Oddly Do Sentence Case: pascal_case, camel_case, first_word_upper, all_upper, all_lower

If you’re using Visual Studios 2010, 2012, 2013, or 2015, fear not. There’s at least a basic EditorConfig free extension for you that enforces the basic rules. There is also an extension for Visual Studio Code to support EditorConfig files that takes just seconds to install although I don’t see a C# one for now, just one for whitespace.


Sponsor: Check out JetBrains Rider: a new cross-platform .NET IDE. Edit, refactor, test and debug ASP.NET, .NET Framework, .NET Core, Xamarin or Unity applications. Learn more and download a 30-day trial!


© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

The culture wars continue. The country is divided with no end in sight. Tabs or spaces? There's even an insane (IMHO) assertion that the spaces people make more money.

I'm going with Gina Trapani on this one. I choose working code.

Teams can fight but the problem of formatting code across teams is solved by EditorConfig. I'm surprised more people don't know about it and use it, so this blog post is my small way of getting the word out. TELL THE PEOPLE.

Take a project and make a new .editorconfig file and put this in it. I'll use a dotnet new console example hello world app.

[*.cs]

indent_style = tab
indent_size = tab
tab_size = 4

I've set mine in this example to just *.cs, but you could also say [*.{cs,js}] or just [*] if you like, as well as have multiple sections.

You'll check this file in WITH your project so that everyone on the team shares the team's values.

Here in Notepad2 we can see someone has used spaces for whitespace, like a savage. Whitespace appears as pale dots in this editor.

image

I'll open this project in Visual Studio 2017 which supports the EditorConfig file natively. Notice the warning at the bottom where VS lets me know that this project has conventions that are different than my own.

user preferences for this file type are overwidden by this project's coding conventions

VS Format Document commands will use tabs rather than spaces for this project. Here is the same doc reformatted in VS:

image

At this point I'm comforted that the spaces have been defeated and that cooler heads have prevailed - at least for this project.

.NET Extensions to EditorConfig

Even better, if your editor supports it, you can include "EditorConfig Extensions" for specific files or languages. This way your team can keep things consistent across projects. If you're familiar with FxCop and StyleCop, this is like those.

There's a ton of great .NET EditorConfig options you can set to ensure the team uses consistent Language Conventions, Naming Conventions, and Formatting Rules.

  • Language Conventions are rules pertaining to the C# or Visual Basic language, for example, var/explicit type, use expression-bodied member.
  • Formatting Rules are rules regarding the layout and structure of your code in order to make it easier to read, for example, Allman braces, spaces in control blocks.
  • Naming Conventions are rules respecting the way objects are named, for example, async methods must end in "Async".

You can also set the importance of these rules with things like "suggestion," or "warning," or even "error."

As an example, I'll set that my team wants predefined types for locals:

dotnet_style_predefined_type_for_locals_parameters_members = true:error

Visual Studio here puts up a lightbulb and the suggested fix because my team would rather I use "string" than the full "System.String.

Visual Studio respects EditorConfig

The excellent editorconfig for .NET docs have a LOT of great options you can use or ignore. Here's just a FEW (controversial) examples:

  • csharp_new_line_before_open_brace - Do we put open braces at the end of a line, or on their own new line?
  • csharp_new_line_before_members_in_object_initializers - Do we allow A = 3, B = 4, for insist on a new line for each?
  • csharp_indent_case_contents - Do we freakishly line up all our switch/case statements, or do we indent each case like the creator intended?
  • You can even decide on how you Want To Case Things And Oddly Do Sentence Case: pascal_case, camel_case, first_word_upper, all_upper, all_lower

If you're using Visual Studios 2010, 2012, 2013, or 2015, fear not. There's at least a basic EditorConfig free extension for you that enforces the basic rules. There is also an extension for Visual Studio Code to support EditorConfig files that takes just seconds to install although I don't see a C# one for now, just one for whitespace.


Sponsor: Check out JetBrains Rider: a new cross-platform .NET IDE. Edit, refactor, test and debug ASP.NET, .NET Framework, .NET Core, Xamarin or Unity applications. Learn more and download a 30-day trial!



© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

How to Install WordPress in a Subdirectory (Step by Step)

Do you want to install WordPress in a subdirectory? Installing WordPress in a subdirectory allows you to run multiple WordPress instances under the same domain or even a subdomain name. In this article, we will show you how to install WordPress in a subdirectory without… Read More »

The post How to Install WordPress in a Subdirectory (Step by Step) appeared first on WPBeginner.

Do you want to install WordPress in a subdirectory? Installing WordPress in a subdirectory allows you to run multiple WordPress instances under the same domain or even a subdomain name. In this article, we will show you how to install WordPress in a subdirectory without affecting the parent domain name.

Install WordPress in subdirectory

Subdomain vs Subdirectory? Which One is Better for SEO?

Normally, you would want to start a WordPress website on its own domain name (for example, wpbeginner.com). However, sometimes you may want to create additional websites on the same domain name.

This can be done by either installing WordPress in a subdomain (http://newebsite.example.com) or as a subdirectory (http://example.com/newwebsite/).

One question that we get asked is which one is better for SEO?

Search engines treat subdomains differently from root domain names and assign them rankings as a totally different website.

On the other hand, sub-directories benefit from the domain authority of the root domain thus ranking higher in most cases.

An easier way to create separate WordPress sites in both subdomain or subdirectory is by installing WordPress multisite network.

However, if you want to keep two websites managed separately, then you can install different instances of WordPress.

That being said, let’s take a look at how to install WordPress in a subdirectory.

Step 1. Create a Subdirectory under The Root Domain Name

First you need to create a subdirectory or folder under your root domain name. This is where you will install WordPress files.

Connect to your WordPress hosting account using a FTP client or File Manager in cPanel.

Once connected, go to the root folder of your website. Usually it is the /public_html/ folder. If you already have WordPress installed in the root folder, then you will see your WordPress files and folders there.

Next, you need to right click and select ‘Create new directory’ from the menu.

Create subdirectory

You need to be careful when choosing the name for your subdirectory. This will be part of your new WordPress site’s URL and what your users will type in their browsers to reach this website.

For example, if you name this directory travel-guides then your WordPress website’s address will be:

http://example.com/travel-guides/

New subdirectory created

Step 2. Upload WordPress Files

Your newly created subdirectory is empty at the moment. Let’s change that by uploading WordPress files.

First you need to visit WordPress.org website and click on the download button.

Download WordPress

Your browser will now download the zip file containing the latest WordPress software to your computer.

After downloading the file, you need to select and extract it. Mac users can double click the file to extract it and Windows users need to right click and then select ‘Extract All’.

After extracting the zip file, you will see ‘wordpress’ folder containing all the WordPress files.

Now let’s upload these files to your new subdirectory.

Connect to your website using a FTP client and go to the subdirectory you created in the first step.

In the local files panel of your FTP client, go to to the WordPress folder you just extracted.

Select all files in the WordPress folder and then upload them to your new subdirectory.

Upload WordPress files to the subdirectory

Step 3. Create New Database

WordPress stores all your content in a database. You need to create a new database to use with your new WordPress site installed in a subdirectory.

First, you need to login to the cPanel dashboard of your WordPress hosting account. Click on ‘MySQL Databases’ under the databases section.

MySQL database

On the next screen, you need to provide a name for your new database and then click on ‘Create Database’ button to continue.

New database

Your cPanel dashboard will now create the new MySQL database. In order to use this database you need to create a MySQL username.

Scroll down to MySQL Users section and provide a new username and password. Click on ‘Create User’ button to continue.

New MySQL user

Next, you need to give this newly created user privileges to work on the database you created earlier.

Scroll down to ‘Add user to database’ section. Select your MySQL username and then select your newly created database.

Add user to database

Click on Add button to continue.

Cpanel will now grant the MySQL user full privileges on your newly created database.

Step 4. Install WordPress

Now that everything is in place, you can go ahead and install WordPress. Simply visit the directory you created earlier in a web browser by typing the URL like this:

http://example.com/your-subdirectory-name/

This will bring up the WordPress installation wizard. First you need to select the language for your WordPress website and click on the continue button.

Select language

Next, you will be asked to provide your WordPress database name, database username, password, and host. Enter the database details and click on the submit button.

Provide your database details

WordPress will now connect to your database and you will see a success message like this:

WordPress database connected

Click on ‘Run the install’ button to continue.

On the next screen, you will be asked to provide a title for your website and choose an admin username, password, and email address.

WordPress website details

After entering your website details, click on ‘Run install’ button to continue.

WordPress will now set up your website and will show you a success message:

WordPress successfully installed in the subdirectory

You can now go ahead and login to your new WordPress website installed in the subdirectory.

Step 5. Fix Permalinks

If you have a separate WordPress install in the root directory, then the .htaccess files of your subdirectory will cause conflict. This will result in 404 errors on your website.

To solve this, you need to edit the .htaccess file in your subdirectory WordPress install. Replace the code inside your .htaccess file with the following code:

# BEGIN WordPress
<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /your-subdirectory/
RewriteRule ^index\.php$ - [L]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteRule . /your-subdirectory/index.php [L]
</IfModule>

# END WordPress

Don’t forget to replace /your-subdirectory/ with your own subdirectory name.

We hope this article helped you install WordPress in a subdirectory. You may also want to see our ultimate step by step WordPress SEO guide for beginners.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post How to Install WordPress in a Subdirectory (Step by Step) appeared first on WPBeginner.

How to Disable Unwanted Widgets in WordPress

Do you want to disable unused widgets in WordPress? The widgets screen in WordPress shows you all the widgets that you can add to your theme. The problem is that too many widgets clutter the screen, and you may not need all of them. In… Read More »

The post How to Disable Unwanted Widgets in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

Do you want to disable unused widgets in WordPress? The widgets screen in WordPress shows you all the widgets that you can add to your theme. The problem is that too many widgets clutter the screen, and you may not need all of them. In this article, we will show you how to disable unwanted widgets in WordPress for a clutter free widget experience.

Remove unwanted widgets in WordPress

Why Disable Unwanted Widgets in WordPress?

Widgets are blocks of elements that you can add to your WordPress site’s sidebars or widget ready areas. WordPress comes with several default widgets of its own, and other WordPress plugins may add their own widgets as well.

All these widgets can be seen on the Appearance » Widgets screen. However, you’ll notice that some of these widgets are not very useful, and you will probably never use them on your website.

If you are using plugins that also add their own widgets, then soon the widgets screen will be a huge mess making it difficult to locate the widgets you actually want to use.

Let’s see how to easily clean up the widget screen by disabling unwanted widgets in WordPress.

Disabling Unwanted Widgets in WordPress

First thing you need to do is install and activate the WP Widget Disable plugin. For more details, see our step by step guide on how to install a WordPress plugin.

Upon activation, you need to visit Appearance » Disable Widgets page to configure plugin settings.

Disable widgets settings

The settings page is divided into two tabs. First you need to select the sidebar widgets that you want to disable. Simply check the box next to the widgets that you don’t want to use and click on the save changes button.

You can now visit Appearance » Widgets page to see the difference. All selected widgets will no longer be visible on the widgets screen.

Cleaned up widgets screen in WordPress

WordPress also displays several widgets on the Dashboard page. Some plugins and themes may also add their own widgets to your WordPress dashboard.

Normally, you can clean up the dashboard screen by clicking on the screen options button and uncheck the widgets that you don’t want to see.

Cleaning up dashbaord screen in WordPress

However, doing this will allow you and other users on your site to simply click on screen options button and display those widgets again.

WP Widget Disable plugin allows you to hide dashboard widgets even from screen options menu.

Head over to Appearance » Disable Widgets page and click on the Dashboard Widgets tab.

Select the widgets you want to hide from the dashboard screen and click on the save changes button to store your settings.

You can now visit the dashboard page to see it in action.

Disabled dashboard widgets in WordPress

You will notice that the widgets you selected to remove are no longer visible on the dashboard or inside screen options menu. You can also create your own custom WordPress dashboard widgets to display on the dashboard.

We hope this article helped you learn how to disable unwanted widgets in WordPress. You may also want to see our guide on how to hide unnecessary items from WordPress admin area.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post How to Disable Unwanted Widgets in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

The Book of the Runtime – The internals of the .NET Runtime that you won’t find in the documentation

The Microsoft Docs at https://docs.microsoft.com are really fantastic lately. All the .NET Docs are on GitHub https://github.com/dotnet/docs/ and you can contribute to them. However, in the world of software engineering (here some a bad, mixed metaphor) there’s instructions on how to use a faucet and there’s instructions on how to build and design plumbing from scratch.

RyuJIT High level overview

There’s additional DEEP docs that don’t really belong on the docs site. It’s the Book of the Runtime and for now it’s on GitHub. Here’s the BotR FAQ.

If you’re interested in the internals of a system like the .NET Runtime, these docs are a gold mine for you.

The Book of the Runtime is a set of documents that describe components in the CLR and BCL. They are intended to focus more on architecture and invariants and not an annotated description of the codebase.

It was originally created within Microsoft in ~ 2007, including this document. Developers were responsible to document their feature areas. This helped new devs joining the team and also helped share the product architecture across the team.

We realized that the BotR is even more valuable now, with CoreCLR being open source on GitHub. We are publishing BotR chapters to help a new set of CLR developers.

This book likely isn’t for you if you’re an app developer. Who is it for?

  • Developers who are working on bugs that impinge on an area and need a high level overview of the component.
  • Developers working on new features with dependencies on a component need to know enough about it to ensure the new feature will interact correctly with existing components.
  • New developers need this chapter to maintain a given component.

These aren’t design documents, these are docs that were written after features are implemented in order to explain how they work in practice.

Recently Carol Eidt wrote an amazing walkthrough to .NET Core’s JIT engine. Perhaps start at the JIT Overview and move to the deeper walkthrough. Both are HUGELY detailed and a fascinating read if you’re interested in how .NET makes Dynamic Code Execution near-native speed with the RyuJIT – the next-gen Just in Time compiler.

Here’s a few highlights I enjoyed but you should read the whole thing yourself. It covers the high level phases and then digs deeper into the responsibilities of each. You also get a sense of why the RyuJIT is NOT the same JITter from 15+ years ago – both the problem space and processors have changed.

This is the 10,000 foot view of RyuJIT. It takes in MSIL (aka CIL) in the form of byte codes, and the Importer phase transforms these to the intermediate representation used in the JIT. The IR operations are called “GenTrees�, as in “trees for code generation�. This format is preserved across the bulk of the JIT, with some changes in form and invariants along the way. Eventually, the code generator produces a low-level intermediate called InstrDescs, which simply capture the instruction encodings while the final mappings are done to produce the actual native code and associated tables.

ryujit-phase-diagram

This is just one single comprehensive doc in a collection of documents. As for the rest of the Book of the Runtime, here’s the ToC as of today, but there may be new docs in the repository as it’s a living book.

Check it out!


Sponsor: Check out JetBrains Rider: a new cross-platform .NET IDE. Edit, refactor, test and debug ASP.NET, .NET Framework, .NET Core, Xamarin or Unity applications. Learn more and download a 30-day trial!


© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

The Microsoft Docs at https://docs.microsoft.com are really fantastic lately. All the .NET Docs are on GitHub https://github.com/dotnet/docs/ and you can contribute to them. However, in the world of software engineering (here some a bad, mixed metaphor) there's instructions on how to use a faucet and there's instructions on how to build and design plumbing from scratch.

RyuJIT High level overview

There's additional DEEP docs that don't really belong on the docs site. It's the Book of the Runtime and for now it's on GitHub. Here's the BotR FAQ.

If you're interested in the internals of a system like the .NET Runtime, these docs are a gold mine for you.

The Book of the Runtime is a set of documents that describe components in the CLR and BCL. They are intended to focus more on architecture and invariants and not an annotated description of the codebase.

It was originally created within Microsoft in ~ 2007, including this document. Developers were responsible to document their feature areas. This helped new devs joining the team and also helped share the product architecture across the team.

We realized that the BotR is even more valuable now, with CoreCLR being open source on GitHub. We are publishing BotR chapters to help a new set of CLR developers.

This book likely isn't for you if you're an app developer. Who is it for?

  • Developers who are working on bugs that impinge on an area and need a high level overview of the component.
  • Developers working on new features with dependencies on a component need to know enough about it to ensure the new feature will interact correctly with existing components.
  • New developers need this chapter to maintain a given component.

These aren't design documents, these are docs that were written after features are implemented in order to explain how they work in practice.

Recently Carol Eidt wrote an amazing walkthrough to .NET Core's JIT engine. Perhaps start at the JIT Overview and move to the deeper walkthrough. Both are HUGELY detailed and a fascinating read if you're interested in how .NET makes Dynamic Code Execution near-native speed with the RyuJIT - the next-gen Just in Time compiler.

Here's a few highlights I enjoyed but you should read the whole thing yourself. It covers the high level phases and then digs deeper into the responsibilities of each. You also get a sense of why the RyuJIT is NOT the same JITter from 15+ years ago - both the problem space and processors have changed.

This is the 10,000 foot view of RyuJIT. It takes in MSIL (aka CIL) in the form of byte codes, and the Importer phase transforms these to the intermediate representation used in the JIT. The IR operations are called “GenTrees�, as in “trees for code generation�. This format is preserved across the bulk of the JIT, with some changes in form and invariants along the way. Eventually, the code generator produces a low-level intermediate called InstrDescs, which simply capture the instruction encodings while the final mappings are done to produce the actual native code and associated tables.

ryujit-phase-diagram

This is just one single comprehensive doc in a collection of documents. As for the rest of the Book of the Runtime, here's the ToC as of today, but there may be new docs in the repository as it's a living book.

Check it out!


Sponsor: Check out JetBrains Rider: a new cross-platform .NET IDE. Edit, refactor, test and debug ASP.NET, .NET Framework, .NET Core, Xamarin or Unity applications. Learn more and download a 30-day trial!



© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

How to Find Which WordPress Theme a Site is Using

Have you ever wanted to find out which WordPress theme a website is using? Often we get emails from readers asking us for help in finding the exact theme that a certain website is using. In this article, we will show you how to easily… Read More »

The post How to Find Which WordPress Theme a Site is Using appeared first on WPBeginner.

Have you ever wanted to find out which WordPress theme a website is using? Often we get emails from readers asking us for help in finding the exact theme that a certain website is using. In this article, we will show you how to easily find out which WordPress theme a specific website is using.

Which Theme is a Website is Using?

When you are starting a new website, choosing the right theme is a very important decision.

Often you have ideas and inspirations that you have seen on other websites. In some cases, you may want your website to have almost the same layout and features as another website that you saw on the internet.

This could be possible specially if that website is using one of the thousands of free and paid WordPress themes available in the market.

And thankfully, it’s quite easy to find out which WordPress theme a website is using.

Method 1. Find WordPress Theme used by a Website with IsItWP

One of the easiest way to detect WordPress theme used by a website is with IsItWP. It is an online tool that allows you to look up plugins and themes used by a WordPress website.

First, you need to visit IsItWP website and enter the URL of a website you want to check.

Looking up a website on IsItWP

IsItWP will first check if the website is using WordPress. If it is a WordPress powered website, then IsItWP will check which WordPress theme the website is using. It will also try to detect WordPress plugins used by the website.

After that, it will show you the results with more details about the plugins and theme used by the website.

WordPress theme and plugin details

IsItWP may not be able to offer you details about a custom WordPress theme or a child theme.

However it will display the name of the theme, so you can google it to see if it’s available for download.

Method 2. Manually Detect WordPress Theme Used by a Website

Sometimes website owners change the WordPress theme name. This stop tools like IsItWP to detect which WordPress theme they are using.

However, there still might be plenty of clues hidden in the code that you can detect and find the WordPress theme they are using.

Let’s get started.

Each WordPress theme is required to have a style.css file. This file contains theme header which tells WordPress the name of the theme, theme author, URI, version, etc. It also contains CSS styles used by the theme.

To locate this file, first you need to visit the website. Right click anywhere on the screen and select ‘View Page Source’ from the menu.

View page source of a WordPress website

This will open the source code of the page you are viewing in a new browser tab. Now you need to find a line in the source code that looks something like this:

<link rel='stylesheet' id='themename_style-css'  href='http://example.com/wp-content/themes/theme-name/style.css?ver=1.1.47' type='text/css' media='all' />

You can click on the URL in this line to open the style.css file.

On top of the style.css file, you will see the theme header block which contains information about the theme used by the website. Typically, it would look something like this:

Theme Name:     Theme Name 
Theme URI:      https://example.com
Author:         ThemeAuthorName
Author URI:     https://example.com
Description:    My Theme is a flexible WordPress theme designed for portfolio websites
Version:        1.1.47
License:        GNU General Public License v2 or later
License URI:    http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-2.0.html
Text Domain:    hestia
Tags: blog, custom-logo, portfolio, e-commerce, rtl-language-support, post-formats, grid-layout, one-column, two-columns, custom-background, custom-colors, custom-header, custom-menu, featured-image-header, featured-images, flexible-header, full-width-template, sticky-post, theme-options, threaded-comments, translation-ready

You may be able to find the Theme’s URL or Theme Author’s URL here which will lead you to the theme used by the website.

Finding The Parent Theme

Many WordPress websites use child themes to customize their websites. In that case, their theme header will contain information about the parent theme they are using.

*
Theme Name:   My Child Theme
Description:  Just a child theme
Author:       Peter Smith
Author URL:   Write here the author's blog or website url
Template:     hestia
Version:      1.0
License:      GNU General Public License v2 or later
License URI:  http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-2.0.html
Text Domain:  my-child-theme
*/

In the above example, this header block has an extra ‘Template’ parameter in the theme header block. This template is the parent theme used by this website.

You can also find out the parent theme by looking at the website’s source code. There you will find another style.css file loaded from another theme. This other style.css file is the parent theme’s stylesheet and clicking on it will tell you which parent theme a site is using.

That’s all for now, we hope this article helped you learn how to find which WordPress theme a site is using. You may also want to see our ultimate list of the most wanted WordPress tips, tricks, and hacks.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post How to Find Which WordPress Theme a Site is Using appeared first on WPBeginner.

Spend less time CD’ing around directories with the PowerShell Z shortcut

Everyone has a trick for moving around their computer faster. It might be a favorite shell, a series of aliases or shortcuts. I like using popd and pushd to quickly go deep into a directory structure and return exactly where I was.

Another fantastic utility is simply called “Z.” There is a shell script for Z at https://github.com/rupa/z that’s for *nix, and there’s a PowerShell Z command (a fork of the original) at https://github.com/vincpa/z.

As you move around your machine at the command line, Z is adding the directories you usually visit to a file, then using that file to give you instant autocomplete so you can get back there FAST.

If you have Windows 10, you can install Z in seconds like this:

C:\> Install-Module z -AllowClobber

Then just add “Import-Module z” to the end of your Profile, usually at $env:USERPROFILE\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Microsoft.PowerShell_profile.ps1

Even better, Z works with pushd, cd, or just “z c:\users\scott” if you like. All those directory changes and moves will be recorded it the Z datafile that is stored in ~\.cdHistory.

What do you think? Do you have a favorite way to move around your file system at the command line?


Sponsor: Get the latest JetBrains Rider preview for .NET Core 2.0 support, Value Tracking and Call Tracking, MSTest runner, new code inspections and refactorings, and the Parallel Stacks view in debugger.


© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Everyone has a trick for moving around their computer faster. It might be a favorite shell, a series of aliases or shortcuts. I like using popd and pushd to quickly go deep into a directory structure and return exactly where I was.

Another fantastic utility is simply called "Z." There is a shell script for Z at https://github.com/rupa/z that's for *nix, and there's a PowerShell Z command (a fork of the original) at https://github.com/vincpa/z.

As you move around your machine at the command line, Z is adding the directories you usually visit to a file, then using that file to give you instant autocomplete so you can get back there FAST.

If you have Windows 10, you can install Z in seconds like this:

C:\> Install-Module z -AllowClobber

Then just add "Import-Module z" to the end of your Profile, usually at $env:USERPROFILE\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Microsoft.PowerShell_profile.ps1

Even better, Z works with pushd, cd, or just "z c:\users\scott" if you like. All those directory changes and moves will be recorded it the Z datafile that is stored in ~\.cdHistory.

What do you think? Do you have a favorite way to move around your file system at the command line?


Sponsor: Get the latest JetBrains Rider preview for .NET Core 2.0 support, Value Tracking and Call Tracking, MSTest runner, new code inspections and refactorings, and the Parallel Stacks view in debugger.


© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

How to Create a Video Gallery in WordPress (Step by Step)

Recently, a user asked us how to create a video gallery in WordPress. WordPress makes it easy to embed videos in your blog posts, but it does not allow you to create video galleries out of the box. In this article, we will show you… Read More »

The post How to Create a Video Gallery in WordPress (Step by Step) appeared first on WPBeginner.

Recently, a user asked us how to create a video gallery in WordPress. WordPress makes it easy to embed videos in your blog posts, but it does not allow you to create video galleries out of the box. In this article, we will show you how to easily create a video gallery in WordPress.

Adding a video gallery in WordPress

When and Why Create a Video Gallery in WordPress

WordPress makes it easy to embed videos in your blog posts by simply entering the video URLs. It can also display hosted videos on your own website.

However, you should never upload videos to WordPress. Videos are large files and serving them directly may cause issues with your WordPress hosting service.

You can easily add a single video into your posts but what if you wanted to show multiple videos on a page?

One way to do this is by adding one video after another. While it works, it creates an unpleasant user experience because it requires a lot of scrolling.

Wouldn’t it be nicer if you could create a video gallery with thumbnails just like a photo gallery? This would allow you to show more videos in less space by utilizing a beautiful mobile friendly grid.

Let’s take a look at how to easily create a video gallery in WordPress.

Method 1: Create a Video Gallery in WordPress with Envira Gallery

For this method, we’ll be using the Envira Gallery plugin. It is the best WordPress gallery plugin in the market. It also has a videos addon which allows you to create beautiful mobile-responsive video galleries in WordPress.

Envira Gallery is a paid plugin, and you’ll need at least their pro plan to access the videos addon.

WPBeginner users can use this Envira Gallery coupon to get 25% off.

First thing you need to do is install and activate the Envira Gallery plugin. For more details, see our step by step guide on how to install a WordPress plugin.

Upon activation, you need to visit Envira Gallery » Settings page to add your license key. You can find this information from your account on Envira Gallery website.

Enter your Envira Gallery license key

Next, you need to head over to the Envira Gallery » Addons page. You’ll see all the addons available for you to install. Look for the Videos addon and install it.

Next, you need to head over to Envira Gallery » Addons page. You’ll see all the addons available for you to install. Look for the Videos addon and install it.

Envira Gallery will now fetch and install the videos addon. After that, you need to click ‘Activate’ to start using it on your website.

Activate videos addon

Now you are ready to create your first video gallery.

Head over to the Envira Gallery » Add New page to create your gallery. First, you need to provide a title for your gallery.

Add new video gallery

Envira Gallery can create a video gallery of self-hosted videos as well as videos hosted on YouTube, Vimeo, and Wistia. We recommend using third-party video hosting services for better user experience.

First, you’ll need to upload your videos to YouTube or Vimeo. After that, click on ‘Select videos from other sources’ button to continue.

This will bring up the Insert Media popup where you need to click on the ‘Insert videos’ link in the left column.

Insert videos

You need to click on the ‘Add Video’ button to enter the title and the video URL.

To add more videos, click on the ‘Add Video’ button again. Feel free to add as many videos as you need.

Once you have added all the videos you want to show in the gallery, click on the ‘Insert into Gallery’ button to continue.

Envira will now fetch the thumbnails for your videos and show them under the images section.

You can edit videos at any time by clicking on the ‘pencil’ icon or remove any video. You can also add more videos if needed.

Your video gallery is almost ready. Let’s configure the video gallery settings.

Start by clicking on the ‘Config’ tab in the left column, and under ‘Number of Gallery Columns’ options select two or three column layout.

This ensures that your video thumbnails appear nicely with adequate space between each video.

Video gallery columns

Now let’s add the play button to your video thumbnails.

Switch to the ‘Videos’ tab and check the box next to ‘Display play icon over gallery image’ option.

Add play button to video thumbnails in the gallery

Your video gallery is now ready. Go ahead and click on the publish button to make your video gallery available to WordPress.

Display Video Gallery on Your Website

Envira Gallery makes it easy to display your video gallery in any WordPress post or page. You can also display the gallery in a sidebar.

Let’s create a new page in WordPress and give it an appropriate title, for example: ‘Videos’.

Next, click on the ‘Add Gallery’ button on top of the post editor.

Add gallery button

This will bring up a popup where you’ll see your video gallery. Click to select it and then click on the Insert button.

Insert gallery

Envira Gallery shortcode will now appear in your post editor.

You can now update or publish your page and visit the page to see your video gallery in action.

Envira video gallery

The best part is that clicking on a video item will open it in a lightbox popup with theater mode. This offers a far better viewing experience for your users.

They will be able to view the video without leaving your website, and they can also browse other videos in the gallery by clicking on the thumbnails below the player.

Video gallery popup

Method 2: Create a Video Gallery in WordPress with YouTube Channel Gallery

This method requires a YouTube API key to work, which makes the process a bit lengthier. Don’t worry we’ll walk you through it.

First thing you need to do is install and activate the YouTube Channel Gallery plugin. For more details, see our step by step guide on how to install a WordPress plugin.

Next, you need to head over to Google Developer Console website to generate a YouTube API key.

Click on the ‘Select a project’ button at the top left corner of the screen and then click on the add button.

New Google developer project

On the next screen, you need to provide a name for your project and agree to the terms of service. After that click on the create button to continue.

New project details

Next, you need to click on the API Library and then select YouTube Data API link.

Select YouTube Data API

This will bring you to the API details page where you need to click on the Enable link to turn on this API for your project.

Enable API key

Developer console will now enable the API for your project. You still need to create credentials to get to the API key.

Click on the ‘Create credentials’ button to continue.

Create credentials

Now you need to enter how you will be using the API key. For ‘Where will you be calling the API from?’ option select ‘Web browser (JavaScript)’ and select ‘Public Data’ under ‘What data will you be accessing?’ option.

Credential settings

Click on ‘What credentials do I need’ button to continue.

Developer console will now show your API key. You need to copy and paste this API key in a plain text file. You’ll need it later to create video galleries.

There is one last step remaining which is to restrict your API key to be used only on your website. To do that, click on the Restrict key link shown on your API key screen.

Copy API Key

On the restrictions page, select HTTP Referrers option and then enter your domain name below in the following format:

*.yourdomain.com

Restrict API key

Don’t forget to click on the save button to store your changes,

Now that you have got your YouTube data API key, it’s time to create your video gallery.

YouTube Channel Gallery plugin comes with a powerful shortcode that you can add to your posts and pages to display your video gallery.

Simply create a new page or edit an existing one, and add the following shortcode inside the post editor.

[Youtube_Channel_Gallery user="wpbeginner" maxitems="8" thumb_columns_phones="2" thumb_columns_tablets="4" key="your-youtube-api-key-goes-here"]

Don’t forget to replace the user with your YouTube username, and the key with the YouTube API key you created earlier.

You can now save your post/page and visit your website to see your video gallery in action.

YouTube video gallery plugin

The plugin does not have lightbox popup, and your videos will be played on the page. Clicking on a video thumbnail in the gallery will play the video in the top player.

For more details, please see our tutorial on how to show latest videos from your YouTube channel in WordPress.

That’s all for now.

We hope this article helped you learn how to easily create a video gallery in WordPress. You may also want to see our ultimate step by step guide on how to boost WordPress speed and performance.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post How to Create a Video Gallery in WordPress (Step by Step) appeared first on WPBeginner.