8 Best Places to Get a Custom Logo for Your WordPress Website

Do you want to get a custom logo for your WordPress website? A custom logo helps establish your brand and makes your website stand out. In this article, we will show you some of the best places to get a custom logo for your website… Read More »

The post 8 Best Places to Get a Custom Logo for Your WordPress Website appeared first on WPBeginner.

Do you want to get a custom logo for your WordPress website? A custom logo helps establish your brand and makes your website stand out. In this article, we will show you some of the best places to get a custom logo for your website within a small budget.

Best places to get a custom WordPress logo

Why You Should Get a Custom Logo?

Logos are the representative images used by businesses and organizations. They depict a visual representation of an organization’s business, values, and mission.

They also play an important role in how customers see a brand. Look at the top big name brands, chances are that you can recognize most of their logos quite easily. Brand recognition helps you win customer trust and loyalty overtime.

Most WordPress themes come with the option to upload custom logo. This logo can also be used as site icon or favicon.

Now the problem is that not all of us are graphic designers. You can try to create a custom logo by using an image editing programs, but it may not look professional.

If you want a professional image for your brand, then it helps to hire someone to create your custom logo for your website.

That being said, let’s take a look at some of the best places to get a custom WordPress logo within budget.

1. 99designs

99designs

99designs is a design contest marketplace with a large community of designers. It acts as a middleman between you and designers.

When you place an order, 99designs outsources it to designers who then submit their designs. You can select the design you like the most and only that designer gets paid. This gives you advantage of getting different custom logo ideas from designers of different backgrounds and skill levels.

2. Logojoy

Logojoy

Want to create your own custom logo? Logojoy is an easy to use, DIY, logo maker for non-designers. Unlike other web based graphic design tools, Logojoy uses artificial intelligence and advanced learning algorithms to create logos just like a designer would do.

Logojoy’s simple wizard helps you choose your own colors, images, and words to describe your business. After that it generates designs that look well crafted and professional.

Their pricing plans start as low as $20 for a low resolution logo. Higher pricing plans get you high-resolution files, phone support, color palette, brand guidelines, and more.

3. Dribble

Dribble

Dribble is an online community of designers and artists. Think of it as Pinterest for professional graphic designers, artists, and illustrators where they share their works and other users can like, favorite, and reshare it.

Dribble is not just a source for inspiration. It also acts as a platform to hire designers for freelance work. You can browse designers, check out their portfolios, and contact them directly to hire them.

The cost of a job will actually depend on the freelancer you approach, their expertise and skill level. Dribble may not be the place to find the cheapest custom logo for your website, but it can help you get much better quality.

4. Fiverr

Fiverr

Fiverr is one of the largest online community of freelancers from all over the world. Due to competition among freelancers, you can hire a designer to create a logo design for a lot less money than other places.

Fiverr’s community is organized based on the customer feedback. Freelancers with higher positive feedback tend to charge more than new freelancers who don’t have enough reviews yet.

While the logo may only cost a few bucks, its important to know that often these freelancers are using logo templates with minor tweaks.

5. Upwork

Upwork

Similar to Fiverr, Upwork is an online community of freelancers, entrepreneurs, and designers. It allows you to post a job and accept offers from freelancers. You can then review those freelancers, interview them, and hire the one you want to work with.

Upwork has a robust community with screening tools for both freelancers and clients. Freelancers can participate in online tests to prove their proficiency and skills. Upwork also offers various payment methods, invoices, and allows clients to only pay for the work they approve.

6. DesignCrowd

DesignCrowd

DesignCrowd is a design contest marketplace and an online community of designers. You can start a project by filling in the project brief, selecting your logo design type, and providing a detailed description for the designers to follow.

Next, you’ll pay the contest posting fee and deposit your budget with DesignCrowd. They offer a money back guarantee, which allows you to ask for a refund within 30 days of posting your project. Once you like a custom logo design, you can commit a budget.

7. Freelancer

Freelancer

Freelancer is a large global community of freelancers. You can find web designers, developers, graphic design, audio/video, online marketing experts from every corner of the planet with varying skills levels.

Like many other freelancing websites, Freelancer allows you to post your custom logo project as a job and start accepting offers from freelancers. You can review freelancer profiles, past jobs, feedback and ratings.

Once you find the right freelancer, you can hire them. Upon completion of project, you’ll be able to review and accept the work and release the payment.

8. PeoplePerHour

PeoplePerHour

PeoplePerHour is a curated community of freelancers and professionals. You can browse hourlies (fixed price jobs), post a job, or run a contest. You can also browse freelancers by categories, view their profiles, and portfolios.

Once you post a job, you’ll get access to your Workstream dashboard. This is where you’ll manage and review the work, communicate with freelancers, and get support from PeoplePerHour staff. Once you are satisfied with the logo design, you can release the payment to the freelancer.

We hope this article helped you find the best places to get a custom logo for your website. You may also want to see our article on best examples of contact form page design.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post 8 Best Places to Get a Custom Logo for Your WordPress Website appeared first on WPBeginner.

20 Best BuddyPress Themes for Your WordPress Website

Are you looking for the best WordPress themes for BuddPress? BuddyPress is a sister project of WordPress. It allows you to build an online social network on top of your WordPress website. In this article, we have hand-picked some of the best BuddyPress themes for… Read More »

The post 20 Best BuddyPress Themes for Your WordPress Website appeared first on WPBeginner.

Are you looking for the best WordPress themes for BuddPress? BuddyPress is a sister project of WordPress. It allows you to build an online social network on top of your WordPress website. In this article, we have hand-picked some of the best BuddyPress themes for your WordPress website.

WordPress themes for BuddyPress

Building Your Online Community with BuddyPress and WordPress

WordPress is already favored by more than 27% of all websites on the internet. That’s all because of the ease of use and flexibility it offers.

BuddyPress is a sister project of WordPress. It allows you to add an online community with social networking features to your WordPress site.

It is available as a WordPress plugin which means you need a self-hosted WordPress.org site to use it.

To start a self-hosted WordPress.org website, you’ll need to sign up with a WordPress hosting company and get a domain name.

We recommend using Bluehost. They are one of the largest hosting companies in the world and an official WordPress recommended hosting service.

After buying hosting, you can go on and install WordPress. For step by step instructions see our how to start a WordPress blog guide.

Next, you need to install BuddyPress plugin. For more details, see our step by step guide on how to install a WordPress plugin.

That being said, let’s take a look at some of the best WordPress themes for BuddyPress that’ll make your website look great.

Note: This list contains both free and paid themes and all of them are mobile responsive.

1. Black Flag

Black Flag

Black Flag is a modern WordPress theme compatible with BuddyPress. Suitable for content-rich online communities with a magazine / news style homepage. It comes with variety of layouts and styles, smart widgets with flexible sidebars, and a dedicated videos page.

It includes a reviews section as well, which allows users on your website to easily add reviews of products. It also offers built-in support for bbPress and WooCommerce out of the box.

2. Cool Stuff

Cool Stuff

Cool Stuff is a clean modern WordPress theme for BuddyPress, magazine, news, and blog websites. It features a modern homepage with a traditional two-column blog layout. It includes built-in sections to add filterable portfolio, services, events, and members.

It is super flexible and comes with awesome features like social sharing, image slider, contact form, and Google Maps support.

3. Credence

Credence

Credence is a flexible multipurpose WordPress theme suitable for BuddyPress, magazine, news, or business websites. It has multiple layouts and a premium drag and drop page builder allowing you to create pages from scratch with no coding skills.

It is translation ready and can be used to create multilingual websites. You can also use it to add an online store using WooCommerce.

4. Checkout

Checkout

If you want to sell digital downloads on your BuddyPress website, then you’ll like Checkout. It is a BuddyPress compatible WordPress theme designed specifically to work with Easy Digital Downloads, one of the best WordPress eCommerce plugins in the market.

Checkout has a beautiful dashboard for vendors or sellers, a portfolio section, and beautiful typography using Typekit fonts. It comes with a getting started page and works with several popular free WordPress plugins.

5. Noozbeat

Noozbeat

Noozbeat is a modern WordPress magazine theme compatible with BuddyPress. It features a magazine layout focusing on keeping users engaged with your content. It has unlimited color choices, multiple category layouts, and ready to use advertising spots.

Inside you’ll also find custom widgets for social networking, Twitter, Instagram, content discovery, and more. It has a custom theme options panel allowing you to turn elements on or off, add your logo, change backgrounds, and more.

6. No Offense

No Offense

No Offense is a WordPress theme for psychology clinics, therapists, and mental health websites. It supports BuddyPress to easily create your own online community. Featuring a modern business website layout for the homepage, it has flexible options offering lots of customization choices.

It has various shortcodes, 1-click demo installer, Font Awesome icons, and custom theme options panel. It is WooCommerce ready and can be used to create multilingual websites as well.

7. The Core

The Core

The Core is a bundle of 20 WordPress themes packed inside one super flexible theme. All of these themes are fully compatible with BuddyPress. It includes a powerful integrated page builder allowing you to easily create your own layouts if you need.

It has unlimited colors, unlimited sidebars, several custom post types, WooCommerce support, and more. It is easy to use and has a custom theme options panel to help you easily setup your website.

8. Game On

Game On

Do you want to build a fun arcade gaming community with BuddyPress? Check out Game On. It is a WordPress theme for gaming websites with BuddyPress support. It has integrated options to display ads on progress bars during game load and on the game page.

It has flexible customization options with different colors and Google Fonts. It also comes with an step by step theme setup guide and extensive documentation.

9. The Columnist

The Columnist

The Columnist is a free WordPress theme for magazine, news, blogs, bbPress and BuddyPress websites. It comes with different layout choices for homepage, archives, single pages, bbPress and BuddyPress.

It includes a responsive slider and four color schemes. Content can be displayed in up to four-column layout.

10. NewsBlok

NewsBlok

Need a powerful theme for your content rich news or magazine site? NewsBlok is theme for magazine and news websites with multiple layouts and several styles. It is fully compatible with BuddyPress and WooCommerce.

It comes with a 1-click demo installer, custom widgets, reviews section, and live theme customizer support.

11. Games Zone

Games Zone

As the name suggests Game Zone is a WordPress theme for online gaming communities. You can easily use it to build your own gaming community with BuddyPress. It has sections for reviews, articles, events, members, and more.

It also offers multiple layout choices, shortcodes, custom widgets, and many more customization options. It has 2 sliders, a simple theme options panel, and 1-click demo website installer.

12. Streamline

Streamline

If video content plays an important role in your BuddyPress community, then checkout Streamline. It is a WordPress theme designed for magazine/news websites with beautiful video embeds.

It uses customizer for all theme options, which allows you to setup your website with live preview. It has custom widgets for featured posts carousel, newsletter widget, videos, and more. You can also change theme colors, backgrounds, layout, and fonts to make it truly yours.

13. Sauron

Sauron

Sauron is a free multipurpose WordPress theme that can be used to build to any kind of WordPress site. It comes ready for not BuddyPress, bbPress, WooCommerce, and WPML for multilingual websites.

Among other features, it has a full-width posts grid, front page builder, fullscreen lightbox slideshow, layout editor, typography options with Google fonts and social sharing options. It is easy to setup and child theme friendly.

14. IndiGamer

IndiGamer

IndiGamer is another great option for gaming websites. With its dark color scheme and futuristic look it gives your site a unique look.

You can further customize this look to make it yours with custom logo, background, homepage layouts, and page templates. It is easy to setup and supports all popular WordPress page builders like Beaver Builder, Elementor, Divi, and more.

15. Arcade Basic

Arcade Basic

Arcade Basic is a free WordPress theme with flexible settings to be used as a multipurpose theme. It is compatible with BuddyPres, WooCommerce, and bbPress. You can use the theme customizer to add your own header image, page layout, site width, and more.

It has a sticky floating navigation menu at top, social media menu, and two column layout for blog pages.

16. Compass

Compass

Compass is a customizable and sophisticated WordPress theme. Suitable for blogs, magazines, and business websites, Compass is also fully compatible with BuddyPress. It has a fully-widgetized homepage layout, which means you can add custom widgets to setup your homepage.

Homepage uses featured images and your content categories to beautifully curate your content. It has a mobile friendly slider and all theme options can be setup in live customizer.

17. Monochrome

If you prefer minimalist style in your design, then you’ll love Monochrome. It features beautiful typography and spacious layout for a cleaner and sophisticated look.

It is built on top of the rock solid foundation of Genesis framework. It also uses minimalism in its approach to theme options, which are fewer but have everything you’ll need.

18. Sufia

Sufia

Sufia is another great option for content rich WordPress websites. It is compatible with BuddyPress and includes features like Ajax based custom login form, user avatar display in menu bar, user submitted posts, and authors list.

It has widgetized layout with 29 custom widgets. You just need to drag and drop them to create your own layout. It has 10 unique homepages, 5 custom panels, and 7 header styles. This gives you enough options to create a unique look for your website.

19. Modules

Modules

Modules is a modern and stylish WordPress theme that is truly flexible and easy to use. It comes with 16 ready-made websites that you can install with the click of a button. You can then replace the content with your own to get started.

You’ll also like modules that come with the theme. These are content blocks and design elements that you can just drag and drop to build your pages. Modules is fully compatible with BuddyPress, WooCommerce, and all major WordPress plugins.

20. Titan

Titan

Most content rich websites need a layout that can showcase their best content. Titan does this well. It is a WordPress magazine/news theme with multiple layouts, styles, and several content discovery features.

It is fully compatible with BuddyPress, WooCommerce, and other popular WordPress plugins. It has several page templates, and you can change layout for each page easily. Theme setup is quite simple and pain free with tons of cool features for you to try on your website.

We hope this article helped you find the best WordPress themes for BuddyPress. You may also want to see our ultimate step by step guide on how to boost WordPress speed and performance.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post 20 Best BuddyPress Themes for Your WordPress Website appeared first on WPBeginner.

Peachpie – Open Source PHP Compiler to .NET and WordPress under ASP.NET Core

The Peachpie PHP compiler project joined the .NET Foundation this week and I’m trying to get my head around it. PHP in .NET? PHP on .NET? Under .NET? What compiles to what? Why would I want this? How does it work? Does it feel awesome or does it feel gross?

image

Just drink this in.

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\peachcon> type program.php
<?php

function main()
{
echo "Hello .NET World!";
}

main();

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\peachcon> dotnet run
Hello .NET World!

Just like that. Starting from a .NET SDK (They say 1.1, although I used a 2.0 preview) you just add their templates

dotnet new -i Peachpie.Templates::*

Then dotnet new now shows a bunch of php options.

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\peachcon> dotnet new | find /i "php"
Peachpie console application peachpie-console PHP Console
Peachpie Class library peachpie-classlibrary PHP Library
Peachpie web application peachpie-web PHP Web/Empty

dotnet new peachpie-console for example, then dotnet restore and dotnet run. Boom.

NOTE: I did have to comment out his one line “<Import Project=”$(CSharpDesignTimeTargetsPath)” />” in their project file that doesn’t work at the command line. It’s some hack they did to make things work in Visual Studio but I’m using VS Code. I’m sure it’s an alpha-point-in-time thing.

It’s really compiling PHP into .NET Intermediate Language!

PHP to .NET

You can see my string here:

Hello .NET World inside a PHP app inside the CLR

But…why? Here’s what they say, and much of it makes sense to me.

  1. Performance: compiled code is fast and also optimized by the .NET Just-in-Time Compiler for your actual system. Additionally, the .NET performance profiler may be used to resolve bottlenecks.
  2. C# Extensibility: plugin functionality can be implemented in a separate C# project and/or PHP plugins may use .NET libraries.
  3. Sourceless distribution: after the compilation, most of the source files are not needed.
  4. Power of .NET: Peachpie allows the compiled WordPress clone to run in a .NET JIT’ted, secure and manageable environment, updated through windows update.
  5. No need to install PHP: Peachpie is a modern compiler platform and runtime distributed as a dependency to your .NET project. It is downloaded automatically on demand as a NuGet package or it can be even deployed standalone together with the compiled application as its library dependency.

PHP does have other VMs/Runtimes that are used (beyond just PHP.exe) but the idea that I could reuse code between PHP and C# is attractive, not to mention the “PHP as dependency” part. Imagine if I have an existing .NET shop or project and now I want to integrate something like WordPress?

PHP under ASP.NET Core

Their Web Sample is even MORE interesting, as they’ve implemented PHP as ASP.NET Middleware. Check this out. See where they pass in the PHP app as an assembly they compiled?

using Peachpie.Web;

namespace peachweb.Server
{
class Program
{
static void Main(string[] args)
{
var host = new WebHostBuilder()
.UseKestrel()
.UseUrls("http://*:5004/")
.UseStartup<Startup>()
.Build();

host.Run();
}
}

class Startup
{
public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
// Adds a default in-memory implementation of IDistributedCache.
services.AddDistributedMemoryCache();

services.AddSession(options =>
{
options.IdleTimeout = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(30);
options.CookieHttpOnly = true;
});
}

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app)
{
app.UseSession();

app.UsePhp(new PhpRequestOptions(scriptAssemblyName: "peachweb"));
app.UseDefaultFiles();
app.UseStaticFiles();
}
}
}

Interesting, but it’s still Hello World. Let’s run WordPress under PeachPie (and hence, under .NET). I’ll run MySQL in a local Docker container for simplicity:

docker run -e MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD=password -e MYSQL_DATABASE=wordpress -p 3306:3306 -d mysql

I downloaded WordPress from here (note they have the “app” bootstrapper” that hosts .NET and then runs WordPress) restore and run.

WordPress under .NET Core

It’s early and it’s alpha – so set your expectations appropriately – but it’s surprisingly useful and appears to be under active development.

What do you think?

Be sure to explore their resources at http://www.peachpie.io/resources and watch their video of WordPress running on .NET. It’s all Open Source, in the .NET Foundation, and the code is up at https://github.com/iolevel/ and you can get started here: http://www.peachpie.io/getstarted


Sponsor: Check out JetBrains Rider: a new cross-platform .NET IDE. Edit, refactor, test and debug ASP.NET, .NET Framework, .NET Core, Xamarin or Unity applications. Learn more and download a 30-day trial!


© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

The Peachpie PHP compiler project joined the .NET Foundation this week and I'm trying to get my head around it. PHP in .NET? PHP on .NET? Under .NET? What compiles to what? Why would I want this? How does it work? Does it feel awesome or does it feel gross?

image

Just drink this in.

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\peachcon> type program.php

<?php

function main()
{
echo "Hello .NET World!";
}

main();

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\peachcon> dotnet run
Hello .NET World!

Just like that. Starting from a .NET SDK (They say 1.1, although I used a 2.0 preview) you just add their templates

dotnet new -i Peachpie.Templates::*

Then dotnet new now shows a bunch of php options.

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\peachcon> dotnet new | find /i "php"

Peachpie console application peachpie-console PHP Console
Peachpie Class library peachpie-classlibrary PHP Library
Peachpie web application peachpie-web PHP Web/Empty

dotnet new peachpie-console for example, then dotnet restore and dotnet run. Boom.

NOTE: I did have to comment out his one line "<Import Project="$(CSharpDesignTimeTargetsPath)" />" in their project file that doesn't work at the command line. It's some hack they did to make things work in Visual Studio but I'm using VS Code. I'm sure it's an alpha-point-in-time thing.

It's really compiling PHP into .NET Intermediate Language!

PHP to .NET

You can see my string here:

Hello .NET World inside a PHP app inside the CLR

But...why? Here's what they say, and much of it makes sense to me.

  1. Performance: compiled code is fast and also optimized by the .NET Just-in-Time Compiler for your actual system. Additionally, the .NET performance profiler may be used to resolve bottlenecks.
  2. C# Extensibility: plugin functionality can be implemented in a separate C# project and/or PHP plugins may use .NET libraries.
  3. Sourceless distribution: after the compilation, most of the source files are not needed.
  4. Power of .NET: Peachpie allows the compiled WordPress clone to run in a .NET JIT'ted, secure and manageable environment, updated through windows update.
  5. No need to install PHP: Peachpie is a modern compiler platform and runtime distributed as a dependency to your .NET project. It is downloaded automatically on demand as a NuGet package or it can be even deployed standalone together with the compiled application as its library dependency.

PHP does have other VMs/Runtimes that are used (beyond just PHP.exe) but the idea that I could reuse code between PHP and C# is attractive, not to mention the "PHP as dependency" part. Imagine if I have an existing .NET shop or project and now I want to integrate something like WordPress?

PHP under ASP.NET Core

Their Web Sample is even MORE interesting, as they've implemented PHP as ASP.NET Middleware. Check this out. See where they pass in the PHP app as an assembly they compiled?

using Peachpie.Web;


namespace peachweb.Server
{
class Program
{
static void Main(string[] args)
{
var host = new WebHostBuilder()
.UseKestrel()
.UseUrls("http://*:5004/")
.UseStartup<Startup>()
.Build();

host.Run();
}
}

class Startup
{
public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
// Adds a default in-memory implementation of IDistributedCache.
services.AddDistributedMemoryCache();

services.AddSession(options =>
{
options.IdleTimeout = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(30);
options.CookieHttpOnly = true;
});
}

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app)
{
app.UseSession();

app.UsePhp(new PhpRequestOptions(scriptAssemblyName: "peachweb"));
app.UseDefaultFiles();
app.UseStaticFiles();
}
}
}

Interesting, but it's still Hello World. Let's run WordPress under PeachPie (and hence, under .NET). I'll run MySQL in a local Docker container for simplicity:

docker run -e MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD=password -e MYSQL_DATABASE=wordpress -p 3306:3306 -d mysql

I downloaded WordPress from here (note they have the "app" bootstrapper" that hosts .NET and then runs WordPress) restore and run.

WordPress under .NET Core

It's early and it's alpha - so set your expectations appropriately - but it's surprisingly useful and appears to be under active development.

What do you think?

Be sure to explore their resources at http://www.peachpie.io/resources and watch their video of WordPress running on .NET. It's all Open Source, in the .NET Foundation, and the code is up at https://github.com/iolevel/ and you can get started here: http://www.peachpie.io/getstarted


Sponsor: Check out JetBrains Rider: a new cross-platform .NET IDE. Edit, refactor, test and debug ASP.NET, .NET Framework, .NET Core, Xamarin or Unity applications. Learn more and download a 30-day trial!


© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

How to Create a Fanfiction Archive With WordPress

Do you enjoy writing fanfiction? While you can add your fanfiction as normal posts, it becomes difficult to organize and showcase them on your site. In this article, we will show you how to create a fanfiction archive with WordPress. Why Create a Fanfiction Archive… Read More »

The post How to Create a Fanfiction Archive With WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

Do you enjoy writing fanfiction? While you can add your fanfiction as normal posts, it becomes difficult to organize and showcase them on your site. In this article, we will show you how to create a fanfiction archive with WordPress.

Creating fanfiction archive with WordPress

Why Create a Fanfiction Archive Instead of Posts?

WordPress comes with two commonly used content types called posts and pages. While these content types are sufficient for most people, it doesn’t give you everything you may need when writing fanfiction.

For example, you may want to keep your fanfiction separate from your main blog, or you may want to add collaborators to participate in writing activities. You might even want to work on multiple books or genres at the same time.

That’s where you need to use custom post types and taxonomies to create a perfect fanfiction archive that’s easy for your audience to browse through.

[insert demo screenshot]

Let’s take a look at how to create a fanfiction archive in WordPress without any coding or WordPress programming skills.

Creating Fanfiction in WordPress

First thing you need to do is install and activate the WriteShare plugin. For more details, see our step by step guide on how to install a WordPress plugin.

Upon activation, you need to visit WriteShare » Settings page to configure plugin settings.

WriteShare settings page

On the settings page, you can allow users to register on your site to write fanfiction or any other content. Next, you need to check ‘Writer privileges’ checkbox to make those users authors.

If you don’t want to allow users to register and write content, or you want to manually add users you trust, then make sure that both these options are unchecked.

Next, you need to select Fanfic next to the ‘Writing content’ type option. The plugin also allows you to create other content types like academic, poems, creative writing, essays, recipes, dreams, and more.

Now, you’ll reach the taxonomy section of plugin settings. In WordPress, taxonomies allow you to group different content types. For example, categories and tags are two default taxonomies available when you are writing blog posts.

Since you are creating a new content type, you’ll need new custom taxonomies to efficiently organize items you save as fanfiction.

Click on ‘try these for size’ link and the plugin will automatically create taxonomies based on the content type you selected above.

Create taxonomies for fanfiction

For fanfiction, it will create genre, book, and chapter taxonomies. You can delete any of these or create your own by clicking on Add Taxonomy button.

Don’t forget to click on the save changes button to store your settings.

Writing Fanfiction in WordPress with WriteShare

Now that you have setup the plugin, you will notice the new menu item labeled ‘Fanfic’ in your sidebar. To add a new Fanfic item, you need to visit Fanfic » Add New page.

You will see a page similar to post and page edit screens in WordPress.

Add new fanfiction item

Here you can write fanfiction like you would write any other WordPress post or page. You can add genre, book, or chapter. Once you are done, you can save or publish it.

Displaying Fanfiction on Your Website

After adding a few fanfiction items, you’ll not be able to see them on your live website. That’s because WordPress themes are mostly setup to show posts and pages out of the box but not custom post types.

To fix this, you need to head over to Appearance » Menus page. This is where you can edit navigation menus of your WordPress site.

You need to click on the custom links in the left column to expand it. In the URL field, add the URL of your fanfic archive page which would be something like this:

http://example.com/fanfic/

Don’t forget to replace example.com with your own domain name. In the link text field, enter Fanfiction and then click on ‘Add to Menu’ button.

Add fanfiction to navigation menus in WordPress

You will notice a new menu item labeled ‘Fanfiction’ appear in the right column. You can drag and drop it to adjust its position.

Don’t forget to click on the ‘Save Menu’ button to store your changes.

Rearrange and save menu

You can now visit your website to see it in action. The Fanfiction archive link will now appear in your site’s navigation menu. Clicking on it will take users to your fanfiction archive page.

Fanfiction archive search

The archive page has a powerful search and filter feature at top. This allow visitors to easily search and sort fanfiction by genre, books, chapters, or authors.

Below that, it will show fanfiction items in a reverse chronological order (newest items first).

Fanfiction items

Building a Fanfic Writing Community in WordPress

WriteShare is a powerful plugin written specifically to help writers create online communities and share their works. It allows you to easily build your own online writing community of authors.

Here is how you would setup an online writing community and allow users to submit fanfiction to your website.

First, head over to WriteShare » Settings page and make sure that membership and writing privileges options are enabled.

Enable membership and writing privileges

Next, you need to review your fanfic taxonomies. Each taxonomy comes with a few settings which allow you to control how authors can use them on your site.

For example, you can restrict Genre by checking the box next to ‘Only admins and editors can add terms to this taxonomy’. This will allow you to prefill the Genre taxonomy. Your authors will be able to select genre from your list instead of adding new genres.

Taxonomy settings

Once you have reviewed taxonomy settings, don’t forget to click on the ‘Save Changes’ button to store your settings.

Next, you need to visit Appearance » Menus page and these links to your navigation menu.

http://example.com/write/
http://example.com/profile/

Add user menus for fanfiction writers

Don’t forget to click on the save menu button to store your changes.

You can now visit your website, and you’ll see the write and profile links in your navigation menu. Clicking on the ‘Write’ link will take logged in users to a page where they can write or submit fanfiction.

Write fanfiction

Authors will also be able to edit their fanfiction items by visiting their profile page. They will see the list of items they have submitted, and they can edit them without accessing the admin area of your website.

Author profile page

We hope this article helped you learn how to create fanfiction archive and your own online fanfiction community in WordPress. You may also want to see our ultimate WordPress SEO guide for beginners.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post How to Create a Fanfiction Archive With WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

dotnet sdk list and dotnet sdk latest

dotnet sdk listCan someone make .NET Core better with a simple global command? Fanie Reynders did and he did it in a simple and elegant way. I’m envious, in fact, because I spec’ed this exact thing out in a meeting a few months ago but I could have just done it like he did and I would have used fewer keystrokes!

Last year when .NET Core was just getting started, there was a “DNVM” helper command that you could use to simplify dealing with multiple versions of the .NET SDK on one machine. Later, rather than ‘switching global SDK versions,’ switching was simplified to be handled on a folder by folder basis. That meant that if you had a project in a folder with no global.json that pinned the SDK version, your project would use the latest installed version. If you liked, you could create a global.json file and pin your project’s folder to a specific version. Great, but I would constantly have to google to remember the format for the global.json file, and I’d constantly go into c:\Program Files\dotnet in order to get a list of the currently installed SDKs. I proposed that Microsoft make a “dotnet sdk list” command and the ability to pin down versions like “dotnet sdk 1.0.4” and even maybe install new ones with “dotnet sdk install 2.1.0” or something.

Fanie did all this for us except the installation part, and his implementation is clean and simple. It’s so simple that I just dropped his commands into my Dropbox’s Utils folder that I have in my PATH on all my machines. Now every machine I dev on has this extension.

Note that if I type “dotnet foo” the dotnet.exe driver will look in the path for an executable command called dotnet-foo.* and run it.

C:\Users\scott\Desktop>dotnet foo
No executable found matching command "dotnet-foo"

C:\Users\scott\Desktop>dotnet sdk
No executable found matching command "dotnet-sdk"

He created a dotnet-sdk.cmd you can get on his GitHub. Download his repo and put his command somewhere in your path. Now I can do this:

C:\Users\scott\Desktop>dotnet sdk list
The installed .NET Core SDKs are:
1.0.0
1.0.0-preview2-003131
1.0.0-rc3-004530
1.0.2
1.0.4

Which is lovely, but the real use case is this:

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\fancypants>dotnet --version
1.0.4

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\fancypants>dotnet sdk 1.0.0
Switching .NET Core SDK version to 1.0.0

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\fancypants>dotnet --version
1.0.0

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\fancypants>dir
Volume in drive C is Windows
Directory of C:\Users\scott\Desktop\fancypants

07/26/2017 04:53 PM 47 global.json
1 File(s) 47 bytes

Then if I go “dotnet sdk latest” it just deletes the global.json. Perhaps in a perfect world it should just remove the sdk JSON node in case global.json has been modified, but for now it’s great. Without the global.json the dotnet.exe will just use your latest installed SDK.

This works with .NET Core 2.0 as well. This should be built-in, but for now it’s a very nice example of a clean extension to dotnet.exe.

Oh, and by the way, he also made a “.net.cmd” so you can do this with all your dotnet.exe commands.

.NET run

Give these commands a try!


Sponsor: Check out JetBrains Rider: a new cross-platform .NET IDE. Edit, refactor, test and debug ASP.NET, .NET Framework, .NET Core, Xamarin or Unity applications. Learn more and download a 30-day trial!


© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

dotnet sdk listCan someone make .NET Core better with a simple global command? Fanie Reynders did and he did it in a simple and elegant way. I'm envious, in fact, because I spec'ed this exact thing out in a meeting a few months ago but I could have just done it like he did and I would have used fewer keystrokes!

Last year when .NET Core was just getting started, there was a "DNVM" helper command that you could use to simplify dealing with multiple versions of the .NET SDK on one machine. Later, rather than 'switching global SDK versions,' switching was simplified to be handled on a folder by folder basis. That meant that if you had a project in a folder with no global.json that pinned the SDK version, your project would use the latest installed version. If you liked, you could create a global.json file and pin your project's folder to a specific version. Great, but I would constantly have to google to remember the format for the global.json file, and I'd constantly go into c:\Program Files\dotnet in order to get a list of the currently installed SDKs. I proposed that Microsoft make a "dotnet sdk list" command and the ability to pin down versions like "dotnet sdk 1.0.4" and even maybe install new ones with "dotnet sdk install 2.1.0" or something.

Fanie did all this for us except the installation part, and his implementation is clean and simple. It's so simple that I just dropped his commands into my Dropbox's Utils folder that I have in my PATH on all my machines. Now every machine I dev on has this extension.

Note that if I type "dotnet foo" the dotnet.exe driver will look in the path for an executable command called dotnet-foo.* and run it.

C:\Users\scott\Desktop>dotnet foo

No executable found matching command "dotnet-foo"

C:\Users\scott\Desktop>dotnet sdk
No executable found matching command "dotnet-sdk"

He created a dotnet-sdk.cmd you can get on his GitHub. Download his repo and put his command somewhere in your path. Now I can do this:

C:\Users\scott\Desktop>dotnet sdk list

The installed .NET Core SDKs are:
1.0.0
1.0.0-preview2-003131
1.0.0-rc3-004530
1.0.2
1.0.4

Which is lovely, but the real use case is this:

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\fancypants>dotnet --version

1.0.4

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\fancypants>dotnet sdk 1.0.0
Switching .NET Core SDK version to 1.0.0

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\fancypants>dotnet --version
1.0.0

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\fancypants>dir
Volume in drive C is Windows
Directory of C:\Users\scott\Desktop\fancypants

07/26/2017 04:53 PM 47 global.json
1 File(s) 47 bytes

Then if I go "dotnet sdk latest" it just deletes the global.json. Perhaps in a perfect world it should just remove the sdk JSON node in case global.json has been modified, but for now it's great. Without the global.json the dotnet.exe will just use your latest installed SDK.

This works with .NET Core 2.0 as well. This should be built-in, but for now it's a very nice example of a clean extension to dotnet.exe.

Oh, and by the way, he also made a ".net.cmd" so you can do this with all your dotnet.exe commands.

.NET run

Give these commands a try!


Sponsor: Check out JetBrains Rider: a new cross-platform .NET IDE. Edit, refactor, test and debug ASP.NET, .NET Framework, .NET Core, Xamarin or Unity applications. Learn more and download a 30-day trial!



© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

How to Display Ad Blocks in Specific Posts in WordPress

Do you want to display ad blocks within specific WordPress posts? This ad placement allows you to show ads when your users are highly engaged with the content. In this article, we will show you how to easily display ad blocks in specific WordPress posts… Read More »

The post How to Display Ad Blocks in Specific Posts in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

Do you want to display ad blocks within specific WordPress posts? This ad placement allows you to show ads when your users are highly engaged with the content. In this article, we will show you how to easily display ad blocks in specific WordPress posts without writing any code or breaking your site.

Displaying ad blocks in specific WordPress posts

Why Display Ads in Specific WordPress Posts?

While there are many ways to make money blogging, banner ads top the list. Often you see banner ads in the sidebar or on the header of the website. Since those are very common ad spots, it leads to banner blindness which affects the click rate, and your site’s revenue.

To deal with this issue, many publishers insert ads within post content. It works because this is the point when your users are most engaged with the content. This increases ad visibility and helps you get more clicks.

However, you also need to consider user experience. Placing too many ads inside your posts can be obtrusive and annoying.

To reduce the adverse effects, you can selectively display ad blocks in specific WordPress posts on your site. These posts can be your most popular posts, long form articles, or featured content.

Having said that, let’s see how to easily display ads in specific WordPress posts.

Displaying Ads in Specific WordPress Posts

First thing you need to do is install and activate the Adsanity plugin. For more details, see our step by step guide on how to install a WordPress plugin.

Adsanity is a premium WordPress ad management plugin. It allows you to easily create ad blocks and display them anywhere on your WordPress site. It works with any third-party ad network, including Google Adsense. You can also use it to sell ads directly to advertisers.

For more information, see our guide on how to manage ads in WordPress with Adsanity plugin.

After activating the plugin, you need to visit Adsanity » Create Ad page to create your first ad.

First you need to enter a title for your ad. This will help you identify ads on your site.

Next, you need to choose what kind of ad you want to create. Adsanity allows you to add hosted ads and third party ads.

For hosted ads, you need to select the ad size. After that you can enter a tracking URL and provide an image you want to use for the ad.

Create hosted ad

For third-party ad networks like Google Adsense, you need to switch to ‘External Ad Network’ tab. Here you can select the ad size and paste the ad code provided by the ad network.

Ad network code

Next, you can publish your ad or click on the edit link and set an schedule for the ad. You’ll be able to set a start date and an expiration date for this particular ad.

Publish your ad

After you have published the ad, you can add it into your WordPress posts and pages, or anywhere else on your website that you desire.

Inserting Ad Blocks in a WordPress Post

First you need to edit the post or page where you want to display your ad block. You will notice ‘Insert Ad’ and ‘Insert Ad Group’ buttons in the visual editor. You need to click on the insert ad button.

Insert ad in post

This will bring up a popup where you can select the ad you want to display and click on the Insert link.

Select and insert ad

The plugin will insert the ad shortcode inside your post. You can now save and view your post to see the ad in action.

Ad displayed inside a WordPress post

Adding Ad Block in WordPress Post Using Shortcode

You can also add the ad block to a WordPres post using shortcode. This is particularly helpful if you use the text editor to write your posts.

Head over to Adsanity » Manage Ads page. You’ll see the list of ads you have created.

Next to each ad, you will see a shortcode link. Clicking on it will automatically copy the shortcode to your clipboard.

Copying ad shortcode

Go on and edit the post or page where you want to display the ad and paste the shortcode. Don’t forget to update post to save your changes.

We hope this article helped you learn how to easily display ad blocks in specific WordPress posts. You may also want to see our list of the best affiliate marketing tools and plugins for WordPress.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post How to Display Ad Blocks in Specific Posts in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

12 Signs That Your WordPress Site is Hacked

We are often asked what are some signs that indicate a WordPress site is hacked? There are some common telltale signs that may help you figure out if your WordPress site is hacked or compromised. In this article, we will share 12 common signs that… Read More »

The post 12 Signs That Your WordPress Site is Hacked appeared first on WPBeginner.

We are often asked what are some signs that indicate a WordPress site is hacked? There are some common telltale signs that may help you figure out if your WordPress site is hacked or compromised. In this article, we will share 12 common signs that your WordPress site is hacked.

Signs that your WordPress site is hacked

1. Sudden Drop in Website Traffic

Drop in website traffic

If you look at your Google Analytics reports and see a sudden drop in traffic, then this could be a sign that your WordPress site is hacked.

There are many malware and trojans out there that hijack your website’s traffic and redirect it to spammy websites. Some of them don’t redirect logged in users which allows them to go unnoticed for a while.

Another reason for the sudden drop in traffic is Google’s safe browsing tool, which might be showing warnings to users regarding your website.
Each week, Google blacklists around 20,000 websites for malware and around 50,000 for phishing. That’s why every blogger and business owner needs to pay serious attention to their WordPress security.

You can check your website using the Google’s safe browsing tool to see your safety report.

Spam and malware injection

One of the most common signs among hacked WordPress sites is data injection. Hackers create a backdoor on your WordPress site which gives them access to modify your WordPress files and database.

Some of these hacks add links to spammy websites. Usually these links are added to the footer of your website, but they really could be any where. Deleting the links will not guarantee that they will not come back.

You will need to find and fix the backdoor used to inject this data into your website. See our guide on how to find and fix a backdoor in a hacked WordPress site.

3. Your Site’s Homepage is Defaced

website homepage defaced after hacking

This is probably the most obvious one as it is clearly visible on the homepage of your website. Most hacking attempts do not deface your site’s home page because they want to remain unnoticed for as long as possible.

However, some hackers may deface your website to announce that it has been hacked. Such hackers usually replace your homepage with their own message. Some hackers may even try to extort money from site owners.

4. You are Unable to Login to WordPress

Failure to login in WordPress

If you are unable to login to your WordPress site, then there is a chance that hackers may have deleted your admin account from WordPress.

Since the account doesn’t exist, you would not be able to reset your password from the login page. There are other ways to add an admin account using phpMyAdmin or via FTP. However, your site will remain unsafe until you figure out how a hacker got into your website.

5. Suspicious User Accounts in WordPress

Suspicious user accounts in WordPress

If your site is open to user registration, and you are not using any spam registration protection, then spam user accounts are just common spam that you can simply delete.

However, if you don’t remember allowing user registration and notice new user accounts in WordPress, then your site is probably hacked.

Usually the suspicious account will have administrator user role, and in some cases you may not be able to delete it from your WordPress admin area.

6. Unknown Files and Scripts on Your Server

Unknown files and scripts in WordPress folders

If you’re using a site scanner plugin like Sucuri, then it will alert you when it finds an unknown file or script on your server.

You need to connect to your WordPress site using a FTP client. The most common place where you will find malicious files and scripts is the /wp-content/ folder.

Usually, these files are named like WordPress files to hide in plain sight. Deleting these files immediately will not guarantee that these files will not return. You will need to audit the security of your website specially file and directory structure.

7. Your Website is Often Slow or Unresponsive

Slow or unresponsive website

All websites on internet can become victims of random denial of service attacks. These attacks use several hacked computers and servers from all over the world using fake ips. Sometimes they are just sending too many requests to your server, other times they are actively trying to break into your website.

Any such activity will make your website slow, unresponsive, and unavailable. You will need to check your server logs to see which ips are making too many requests and block them.

It is also possible that your WordPress site is just slow and not hacked. In that case, you need to follow our guide to boost WordPress speed and performance.

8. Unusual Activity in Server Logs

Server logs

Server logs are plain text files stored on your web server. These files keep record of all errors occurring on your server as well as all your internet traffic.

You can access them from your WordPress hosting account’s cPanel dashboard under statistics.

serverlogscpanel

These server logs can help you understand what’s going on when your WordPress site is under attack. They also contain all the ip addresses used to access your website which allows you to block suspicious ip addresses.

9. Failure to Send or Receive WordPress Emails

Email errors in WordPress

Hacked servers are commonly used for spam. Most WordPress hosting companies offer free email accounts with your hosting. Many WordPress site owners use their host’s mail servers to send WordPress emails.

If you are unable to send or recieve WordPress emails, then there is a chance that your mail server is hacked to send spam emails.

10. Suspicious Scheduled Tasks

Suspicious scheduled tasks

Web servers allow users to set up cron jobs. These are scheduled tasks that you can add to your server. WordPress itself uses cron to setup scheduled tasks like publishing scheduled posts, deleting old comments from trash, and so on.

A hacker can exploit cron to run scheduled tasks on your server without you knowing it.

11. Hijacked Search Results

If the search results from your website show incorrect title or meta description, then this is a sign that your WordPress site is hacked.

Looking at your WordPress site, you will still see the correct title and description. The hacker has again exploited a backdoor to inject malicious code which modifies your site data in a way that it is visible only to search engines.

12. Popups or Pop Under Ads on Your Website

Spam popup ads

These types of hacks are trying to make money by hijacking your website’s traffic and showing them their own spam ads for illegal websites. These popups do not appear for logged in visitors or visitors accessing a website directly.

They only appear to the users visiting from search engines. Pop under ads open in new window and remain unnoticeable by users.

Securing and Fixing Your Hacked WordPress Site

Cleaning up a hacked WordPress site can be incredibly painful and difficult. This is why we recommend you to let experts clean up your website.

We use Sucuri to protect all our websites. See how Sucuri helped us block 450,000 WordPress attacks in 3 months.

It comes with 24/7 website monitoring and a powerful website application firewall, which blocks attacks before they even reach your website. Most importantly, they clean up your website if it ever gets hacked.

If you want to clean up your site on your own, then take a look at our beginner’s guide on fixing a hacked WordPress site.

You should also check out our ultimate WordPress security guide to follow the best practices and protect your site.

We hope this article helped you look for signs that your WordPress site is hacked. You may also want to see our list of 24 must have WordPress plugins for business websites.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post 12 Signs That Your WordPress Site is Hacked appeared first on WPBeginner.

12 Signs That Your WordPress Site is Hacked

We are often asked what are some signs that indicate a WordPress site is hacked? There are some common telltale signs that may help you figure out if your WordPress site is hacked or compromised. In this article, we will share 12 common signs that… Read More »

The post 12 Signs That Your WordPress Site is Hacked appeared first on WPBeginner.

We are often asked what are some signs that indicate a WordPress site is hacked? There are some common telltale signs that may help you figure out if your WordPress site is hacked or compromised. In this article, we will share 12 common signs that your WordPress site is hacked.

Signs that your WordPress site is hacked

1. Sudden Drop in Website Traffic

Drop in website traffic

If you look at your Google Analytics reports and see a sudden drop in traffic, then this could be a sign that your WordPress site is hacked.

There are many malware and trojans out there that hijack your website’s traffic and redirect it to spammy websites. Some of them don’t redirect logged in users which allows them to go unnoticed for a while.

Another reason for the sudden drop in traffic is Google’s safe browsing tool, which might be showing warnings to users regarding your website.
Each week, Google blacklists around 20,000 websites for malware and around 50,000 for phishing. That’s why every blogger and business owner needs to pay serious attention to their WordPress security.

You can check your website using the Google’s safe browsing tool to see your safety report.

Spam and malware injection

One of the most common signs among hacked WordPress sites is data injection. Hackers create a backdoor on your WordPress site which gives them access to modify your WordPress files and database.

Some of these hacks add links to spammy websites. Usually these links are added to the footer of your website, but they really could be any where. Deleting the links will not guarantee that they will not come back.

You will need to find and fix the backdoor used to inject this data into your website. See our guide on how to find and fix a backdoor in a hacked WordPress site.

3. Your Site’s Homepage is Defaced

website homepage defaced after hacking

This is probably the most obvious one as it is clearly visible on the homepage of your website. Most hacking attempts do not deface your site’s home page because they want to remain unnoticed for as long as possible.

However, some hackers may deface your website to announce that it has been hacked. Such hackers usually replace your homepage with their own message. Some hackers may even try to extort money from site owners.

4. You are Unable to Login to WordPress

Failure to login in WordPress

If you are unable to login to your WordPress site, then there is a chance that hackers may have deleted your admin account from WordPress.

Since the account doesn’t exist, you would not be able to reset your password from the login page. There are other ways to add an admin account using phpMyAdmin or via FTP. However, your site will remain unsafe until you figure out how a hacker got into your website.

5. Suspicious User Accounts in WordPress

Suspicious user accounts in WordPress

If your site is open to user registration, and you are not using any spam registration protection, then spam user accounts are just common spam that you can simply delete.

However, if you don’t remember allowing user registration and notice new user accounts in WordPress, then your site is probably hacked.

Usually the suspicious account will have administrator user role, and in some cases you may not be able to delete it from your WordPress admin area.

6. Unknown Files and Scripts on Your Server

Unknown files and scripts in WordPress folders

If you’re using a site scanner plugin like Sucuri, then it will alert you when it finds an unknown file or script on your server.

You need to connect to your WordPress site using a FTP client. The most common place where you will find malicious files and scripts is the /wp-content/ folder.

Usually, these files are named like WordPress files to hide in plain sight. Deleting these files immediately will not guarantee that these files will not return. You will need to audit the security of your website specially file and directory structure.

7. Your Website is Often Slow or Unresponsive

Slow or unresponsive website

All websites on internet can become victims of random denial of service attacks. These attacks use several hacked computers and servers from all over the world using fake ips. Sometimes they are just sending too many requests to your server, other times they are actively trying to break into your website.

Any such activity will make your website slow, unresponsive, and unavailable. You will need to check your server logs to see which ips are making too many requests and block them.

It is also possible that your WordPress site is just slow and not hacked. In that case, you need to follow our guide to boost WordPress speed and performance.

8. Unusual Activity in Server Logs

Server logs

Server logs are plain text files stored on your web server. These files keep record of all errors occurring on your server as well as all your internet traffic.

You can access them from your WordPress hosting account’s cPanel dashboard under statistics.

serverlogscpanel

These server logs can help you understand what’s going on when your WordPress site is under attack. They also contain all the ip addresses used to access your website which allows you to block suspicious ip addresses.

9. Failure to Send or Receive WordPress Emails

Email errors in WordPress

Hacked servers are commonly used for spam. Most WordPress hosting companies offer free email accounts with your hosting. Many WordPress site owners use their host’s mail servers to send WordPress emails.

If you are unable to send or recieve WordPress emails, then there is a chance that your mail server is hacked to send spam emails.

10. Suspicious Scheduled Tasks

Suspicious scheduled tasks

Web servers allow users to set up cron jobs. These are scheduled tasks that you can add to your server. WordPress itself uses cron to setup scheduled tasks like publishing scheduled posts, deleting old comments from trash, and so on.

A hacker can exploit cron to run scheduled tasks on your server without you knowing it.

11. Hijacked Search Results

If the search results from your website show incorrect title or meta description, then this is a sign that your WordPress site is hacked.

Looking at your WordPress site, you will still see the correct title and description. The hacker has again exploited a backdoor to inject malicious code which modifies your site data in a way that it is visible only to search engines.

12. Popups or Pop Under Ads on Your Website

Spam popup ads

These types of hacks are trying to make money by hijacking your website’s traffic and showing them their own spam ads for illegal websites. These popups do not appear for logged in visitors or visitors accessing a website directly.

They only appear to the users visiting from search engines. Pop under ads open in new window and remain unnoticeable by users.

Securing and Fixing Your Hacked WordPress Site

Cleaning up a hacked WordPress site can be incredibly painful and difficult. This is why we recommend you to let experts clean up your website.

We use Sucuri to protect all our websites. See how Sucuri helped us block 450,000 WordPress attacks in 3 months.

It comes with 24/7 website monitoring and a powerful website application firewall, which blocks attacks before they even reach your website. Most importantly, they clean up your website if it ever gets hacked.

If you want to clean up your site on your own, then take a look at our beginner’s guide on fixing a hacked WordPress site.

You should also check out our ultimate WordPress security guide to follow the best practices and protect your site.

We hope this article helped you look for signs that your WordPress site is hacked. You may also want to see our list of 24 must have WordPress plugins for business websites.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post 12 Signs That Your WordPress Site is Hacked appeared first on WPBeginner.