Announcing PowerApps with Azure App Service

Introducing PowerAppsMicrosoft announced Azure App Service in March of this year on ScottGu’s blog. Azure App Service includes all this stuff for one price. In fact, if you are already using Web Apps/Sites, have many of these features but may not know it:

  • Web Apps – This is the Azure Web Sites that you use today. .NET, node.js, Python, Java, PHP, and more.
  • Mobile Apps – libraries and runtimes for iOS/Windows/Android/Mac, plus offline sync support, notifications, and more
  • Logic Apps – Workflow in the cloud (like IIFTTT but hosted and controlled but you) that can orchestrate business processes within your App Service
  • API Apps – RESTful web services, connections to lots of SaaS systems like Dropbox, Office365, etc, plus security and automatic versioning.

In April the Azure team added isolated App Service Environments. An App Service Environment provides a isolated and fully dedicated environment for securely running all of your apps including Web Apps, Mobile Apps, API Apps and Logic Apps. Your apps run on virtual machines that only run your apps. You aren’t on a pool of shared machines like much of the. These dedicated App Service Environments can also scale much larger than the standard App Service. App Service Environments always run in their own private virtual network that you control.

Today at the Convergence Conference in Spain, Bill Staples announced PowerApps. The team I work on doesn’t just make ASP.NET, we also make tools and services for Azure App Service and for the last year the team has been building PowerApps. PowerApps makes it easy to quickly create new business apps, connect systems and then share those apps with anyone on your team.

You should go check out http://www.powerapps.com to learn about the creation process for business users (like, folks who use Office but don’t program), but I decided to focus more on how a professional developer would use Azure App Service and PowerApps, so I made a video to demonstrate a real example.

PowerApps for developers

bricksA Real Scenario

I wrote an app something like 13 years ago for Pioneer Courthouse Square here in Portland. The square is the Center of the City and it’s covered with bricks that have the name of the people who donated to have the square built. There’s tens of thousands of bricks and they are hard to find. There was an Access Database and a paper map but that was lame, so I put together an ASP app and a SQL database to generate a printable map that gets visitors within ten or so feet of their brick.

This is a real legacy app that has been running – happily and unchanged – for over a decade. We don’t like to admit apps like this exist but the world of full of them. This apps was created before the iPhone, before ubiquitous connectivity, before web services, and before federated security. I thought it would be cool to make this legacy data available as a JSON-based web service, secure it’s admin access with Azure Active Directory, build a CRUD mobile admin app with PowerApps for iOS, Android, and Windows, and then, just for fun, also create a native Android app with Xamarin 4 and the Azure Mobile Apps libraries so that volunteers can manage requests for photographs of bricks.

What does this all mean? What’s changed?

PowerApps is the business application creation side. Think of it as a new member of the Office Family. It’s not a Visual Studio thing. Apps made with PowerApps are sharable with in your organization as easy as sharing documents and they run on Windows, Android, and iOS. A business user could build a new workflow app and share it with everyone. They can auth that new app against APIs like Office 365, Microsoft Dynamics, Salesforce, Dropbox, Twitter, Google Drive, and OneDrive. For example, my example app takes photos of the bricks and puts the result in Azure Storage, but I could just as easily drop them in Google Drive or OneDrive.

However, for Visual Studio developers, or any developer, you still use the language of your choice (C#, F#, node.js, PHP, etc) and write Web APIs and Apps and host them in Azure App Service as you always have. But, if you want, those APIs can live in a new gallery that is specific to your organization so that anyone in your org (developer or business user alike) can use in their applications. My legacy BrickFinder is now an authenticated API living in an Azure App Service Environment. The API is being used by a website, an Android app written with Xamarin, and also an application created with PowerApps, running everywhere.

One other interesting point to note is that PowerApps pricing isn’t consumption based, it’s user-based pricing. Pay by the head, rather than prices fluctuating by consumption. For companies with public facing apps like my startup, I like pricing that changes with the popularity and usage of my app. For enterprise and large companies, simple pricing that’s per-user makes more sense and is easier to budget for.

Check out the launch videos. PowerApps is in private preview now (go sign up at http://www.powerapps.com if you like), but you’ll be hearing more about it in the months to come. 


Sponsor: Big thanks to Infragistics for sponsoring the feed this week. Responsive web design on any browser, any platform and any device with Infragistics jQuery/HTML5 Controls.  Get super-charged performance with the world’s fastest HTML5 Grid – Download for free now!


© 2015 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Introducing PowerAppsMicrosoft announced Azure App Service in March of this year on ScottGu's blog. Azure App Service includes all this stuff for one price. In fact, if you are already using Web Apps/Sites, have many of these features but may not know it:

  • Web Apps - This is the Azure Web Sites that you use today. .NET, node.js, Python, Java, PHP, and more.
  • Mobile Apps - libraries and runtimes for iOS/Windows/Android/Mac, plus offline sync support, notifications, and more
  • Logic Apps - Workflow in the cloud (like IIFTTT but hosted and controlled but you) that can orchestrate business processes within your App Service
  • API Apps - RESTful web services, connections to lots of SaaS systems like Dropbox, Office365, etc, plus security and automatic versioning.

In April the Azure team added isolated App Service Environments. An App Service Environment provides a isolated and fully dedicated environment for securely running all of your apps including Web Apps, Mobile Apps, API Apps and Logic Apps. Your apps run on virtual machines that only run your apps. You aren't on a pool of shared machines like much of the. These dedicated App Service Environments can also scale much larger than the standard App Service. App Service Environments always run in their own private virtual network that you control.

Today at the Convergence Conference in Spain, Bill Staples announced PowerApps. The team I work on doesn't just make ASP.NET, we also make tools and services for Azure App Service and for the last year the team has been building PowerApps. PowerApps makes it easy to quickly create new business apps, connect systems and then share those apps with anyone on your team.

You should go check out http://www.powerapps.com to learn about the creation process for business users (like, folks who use Office but don't program), but I decided to focus more on how a professional developer would use Azure App Service and PowerApps, so I made a video to demonstrate a real example.

PowerApps for developers

bricksA Real Scenario

I wrote an app something like 13 years ago for Pioneer Courthouse Square here in Portland. The square is the Center of the City and it's covered with bricks that have the name of the people who donated to have the square built. There's tens of thousands of bricks and they are hard to find. There was an Access Database and a paper map but that was lame, so I put together an ASP app and a SQL database to generate a printable map that gets visitors within ten or so feet of their brick.

This is a real legacy app that has been running - happily and unchanged - for over a decade. We don't like to admit apps like this exist but the world of full of them. This apps was created before the iPhone, before ubiquitous connectivity, before web services, and before federated security. I thought it would be cool to make this legacy data available as a JSON-based web service, secure it's admin access with Azure Active Directory, build a CRUD mobile admin app with PowerApps for iOS, Android, and Windows, and then, just for fun, also create a native Android app with Xamarin 4 and the Azure Mobile Apps libraries so that volunteers can manage requests for photographs of bricks.

What does this all mean? What's changed?

PowerApps is the business application creation side. Think of it as a new member of the Office Family. It's not a Visual Studio thing. Apps made with PowerApps are sharable with in your organization as easy as sharing documents and they run on Windows, Android, and iOS. A business user could build a new workflow app and share it with everyone. They can auth that new app against APIs like Office 365, Microsoft Dynamics, Salesforce, Dropbox, Twitter, Google Drive, and OneDrive. For example, my example app takes photos of the bricks and puts the result in Azure Storage, but I could just as easily drop them in Google Drive or OneDrive.

However, for Visual Studio developers, or any developer, you still use the language of your choice (C#, F#, node.js, PHP, etc) and write Web APIs and Apps and host them in Azure App Service as you always have. But, if you want, those APIs can live in a new gallery that is specific to your organization so that anyone in your org (developer or business user alike) can use in their applications. My legacy BrickFinder is now an authenticated API living in an Azure App Service Environment. The API is being used by a website, an Android app written with Xamarin, and also an application created with PowerApps, running everywhere.

One other interesting point to note is that PowerApps pricing isn't consumption based, it's user-based pricing. Pay by the head, rather than prices fluctuating by consumption. For companies with public facing apps like my startup, I like pricing that changes with the popularity and usage of my app. For enterprise and large companies, simple pricing that's per-user makes more sense and is easier to budget for.

Check out the launch videos. PowerApps is in private preview now (go sign up at http://www.powerapps.com if you like), but you'll be hearing more about it in the months to come. 


Sponsor: Big thanks to Infragistics for sponsoring the feed this week. Responsive web design on any browser, any platform and any device with Infragistics jQuery/HTML5 Controls.  Get super-charged performance with the world’s fastest HTML5 Grid - Download for free now!



© 2015 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

How to Use English WordPress Admin on a Multilingual Site

Recently, one of our readers asked: if it was possible to keep using the WordPress admin area in English on a multilingual WordPress site. WordPress powers millions of websites in many different languages. In this article, we will show you how to use English WordPress… Read More »

The post How to Use English WordPress Admin on a Multilingual Site appeared first on WPBeginner.

Recently, one of our readers asked: if it was possible to keep using the WordPress admin area in English on a multilingual WordPress site. WordPress powers millions of websites in many different languages. In this article, we will show you how to use English WordPress admin on a non-English WordPress site.

Switching to English WordPress admin area

Why and Who Needs to Use English WordPress Admin?

WordPress is fully translated in many of the world’s most popular languages. You can use WordPress in your own language. However, if you run a multi-author and multilingual website, then the admin area language can become an issue for some of your users.

For better collaboration and consistency, many site owners may want to keep their WordPress admin area in English while serving the front-end in their local language or a multilingual setting.

This guide will also come in handy if you have to work on a non-English website. You can temporarily switch the admin language to English and switch it back when you are done.

Keeping the English WordPress Admin Area

First thing you need to do is install and activate the English WordPress Admin plugin. Upon activation, the plugin will add a language switcher in the WordPress admin bar.

Switch WordPress admin area to English

Simply take your mouse over to the language switcher, and it will display the option for switching admin area to English. When you click on “Switch to English” link, it will reload the admin screen in the English language.

When you want to switch back to the native language, you can do that from the same menu.

Switch back to native language

That’s all we hope this article helped you keep WordPress admin in English on a non-English site. You may also want to see our guide on how to add Google Translate in WordPress and how to find translation ready WordPress themes.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post How to Use English WordPress Admin on a Multilingual Site appeared first on WPBeginner.

The 2016 HTPC Build

I’ve loved many computers in my life, but the HTPC has always had a special place in my heart. It’s the only always-on workhorse computer in our house, it is utterly silent, totally reliable, sips power, and it’s at the center of our home entertainment, networking, storage, and gaming. This

I've loved many computers in my life, but the HTPC has always had a special place in my heart. It's the only always-on workhorse computer in our house, it is utterly silent, totally reliable, sips power, and it's at the center of our home entertainment, networking, storage, and gaming. This handy box does it all, 24/7.

I love this little machine to death; it's always been there for me and my family. The steady march of improvements in my HTPC build over the years lets me look back and see how far the old beige box PC has come in the decade I've been blogging:

2005~$1000512 MB RAM, single core CPU80 watts idle
2008~$5202 GB RAM, dual core CPU45 watts idle
2011~$4204 GB RAM, dual core CPU + GPU22 watts idle
2013~$3008 GB RAM, dual core CPU + GPU×215 watts idle
2016~$3208 GB RAM, dual core CPU + GPU×410 watts idle

As expected, the per-thread performance increase from 2013's Haswell CPU to 2016's Skylake CPU is modest – 20 percent at best, and that might be rounding up. About all you can do is slap more cores in there, to very limited benefit in most applications. The 6100T I chose is dual-core plus hyperthreading, which I consider the sweet spot, but there are some other Skylake 6000 series variants at the same 35w power envelope which offer true quad-core, or quad-core plus hyperthreading – and, inevitably, a slightly lower base clock rate. So it goes.

The real story is how power consumption was reduced another 33 percent. Here's what I measured with my trusty kill-a-watt:

  • 10w idle with display off
  • 11w idle with display on
  • 13w active standard netflix (720p?) movie playback
  • 14w multiple torrents, display off
  • 15w 1080p video playback in MPC-HC x64
  • 40w Lego Batman 3 high detail 720p gameplay
  • 56w Prime95 full CPU load + Rthdribl full GPU load

These are impressive numbers, much better than I expected. Maybe part of it is the latest Windows 10 update which supports the new Speed Shift technology in Skylake. Speed Shift hands over CPU clockspeed control to the CPU itself, so it can ramp its internal clock up and down dramatically faster than the OS could. A Skylake CPU, with the right OS support, gets up to speed and back to idle faster, resulting in better performance and less overall power draw.

Skylake's on-board HD 530 graphics is about twice as fast as the HD 4400 that it replaces. Haswell offered the first reasonable big screen gaming GPU on an Intel CPU, but only just. 720p was mostly attainable in older games with the HD 4400, but I sometimes had to drop to medium detail settings, or lower. Two generations on, with the HD 530, even recent games like GRID Autosport, Lego Jurassic Park and so on can now be played at 720p with high detail settings at consistently high framerates. It depends on the game, but a few can even be played at 1080p now with medium settings. I did have at least one saved benchmark result on the disk to compare with:

GRID 2, 1280×720, high detail defaults
MaxMinAvg
i3-4130T, Intel HD 4400 GPU322127
i3-6100T, Intel HD 530 GPU503239

Skylake is a legitimate gaming system on a chip, provided you are OK with 720p. It's tremendous fun to play Lego Batman 3 with my son.

At 720p using high detail settings, where there used to be many instances of notable slowdown, particularly in co-op, it now feels very smooth throughout. And since games are much cheaper on PC than consoles, particularly through Steam, we have access to a complete range of gaming options from new to old, from indie to mainstream – and an enormous, inexpensive back catalog.

Of course, this is still far from the performance you'd get out of a $300 video card or a $300 console. You'll never be able to play a cutting edge, high end game like GTA V or Witcher 3 on this HTPC box. But you may not need to. Steam in-home streaming has truly come into its own in the last year. I tried streaming Batman: Arkham Knight from my beefy home office computer to the HTPC at 1080p, and I was surprised to discover just how effortless it was – nor could I detect any visual artifacts or input latency.

It's super easy to set up – just have the Steam client running on both machines at a logged in Windows desktop (can't be on the lock screen), and press the Stream button on any game that you don't have installed locally. Be careful with WiFi when streaming high resolutions, obviously, but if you're on a wired network, I found the experience is nearly identical to playing the game locally. As long as the game has native console / controller support, like Arkham Knight and Fallout 4, streaming to the big screen works great. Try it! That's how Henry and I are going to play through Just Cause 3 this Tuesday and I can't wait.

As before in 2013, I only upgraded the guts of the system, so the incremental cost is low.

That's a total of $321 for this upgrade cycle, about the cost of a new Xbox One or PS4. The i3-6100T should be a bit cheaper; according to Intel it has the same list price as the i3-6100, but suffers from weak availability. The motherboard I chose is a little more expensive, too, perhaps because it includes extras like built in WiFi and M.2 support, although I'm not using either quite yet. You might be able to source a cheaper H170 motherboard than mine.

The rest of the system has not changed much since 2013:

Populate these items to taste, pick whatever drives and mini-ITX case you prefer, but definitely stick with the PicoPSU, because removing the large, traditional case power supply makes the setup both a) much more power efficient at low wattage, and b) much roomier inside the case and easier to install, upgrade, and maintain.

I also switched to Xbox One controllers, for no really good reason other than the Xbox 360 is getting more obsolete every month, and now that my beloved Rock Band 4 is available on next-gen systems, I'm trying to slowly evict the 360s from my house.

The Windows 10 wireless Xbox One adapter does have some perks. In addition to working with the newer and slightly nicer gamepads from the Xbox One, it supports an audio stream over each controller via the controller's headset connector. But really, for the purposes of Steam gaming, any USB controller will do.

While I've been over the moon in love with my HTPC for years, and I liked the Xbox 360, I have been thoroughly unimpressed with my newly purchased Xbox One. Both the new and old UIs are hard to use, it's quite slow relative to my very snappy HTPC, and it has a ton of useless features that I don't care about, like broadcast TV support. About all the Xbox One lets you do is sometimes play next gen games at 1080p without paying $200 or $300 for a fancy video card, and let's face it – the PS4 does that slightly better. If those same games are available on PC, you'll have a better experience streaming them from a gaming PC to either a cheap Steam streaming box, or a generalist HTPC like this one.

The Xbox One and PS4 are effectively plain old PCs, built on:

  • Intel Atom class (aka slow) AMD 8-core x86 CPU
  • 8 GB RAM
  • AMD Radeon 77xx / 78xx GPUs
  • cheap commodity 512GB or 1TB hard drives (not SSDs)

The golden age of x86 gaming is well upon us. That's why the future of PC gaming is looking brighter every day. We can see it coming true in the solid GPU and idle power improvements in Skylake, riding the inevitable wave of x86 becoming the dominant kind of (non mobile, anyway) gaming for the forseeable future.

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How to Show User Registration Date in WordPress

Do you want to show the user registration date in WordPress? Often popular membership sites and forums display the user registration date on profile as “member since 2015”. In this article, we will cover how to show user registration date in WordPress. Where and How… Read More »

The post How to Show User Registration Date in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

Do you want to show the user registration date in WordPress? Often popular membership sites and forums display the user registration date on profile as “member since 2015”. In this article, we will cover how to show user registration date in WordPress.

Showing a the date of a user's registration in WordPress

Where and How You Want to Show User Registration Date?

Some of you may just want to display a user’s registration date in the admin columns of the Users page. This will give you a quick overview of when a user joined your website and allow you to sort by registration date.

Another usage scenario is to display a user’s registration date on the ‘Edit Profile’ page. This will allow any administrator and the user themselves to see when they joined your website.

Last but probably the most popular usage scenario is when you want to display the user registration date on their public profile on the front-end of your website.

Let’s take a look at how you can do all of them.

Adding Registered Date Column on Users Page in Admin Area

First thing you need to do is install and activate the Admin Columns plugin. Upon activation, you need to visit Settings » Admin Columns to configure the plugin.

Add registered column in users table

Under the admin columns tab, click on users and then click on add column button.

Next select ‘Registered” in the Type drop down menu and click on store updates button.

You can now visit the users screen where you will see a new column labeled ‘Registered’ showing the date when a user registered on your WordPress site.

Users table with registration date column

See what other things you can do to add and customize admin columns in WordPress.

Showing Registration Date Field in User Profile

For showing registration date on the edit profile page, you will need to upload a custom plugin to your website.

Simply create a new file on your computer using a text editor like Notepad and save it as membersince.php on your desktop.

Next open the file and paste the following code inside it.

<?php
/*
Plugin Name: Member Since
Plugin URI:  http://www.wpbeginner.com
Description: Adds registration date on edit user profile screen. 
Version:     1.0
Author:      WPBeginner
*/


namespace ShowMemberSince;
add_action( 'plugins_loaded', 'ShowMemberSinceinit' );
/**
 * Adding needed action hooks
*/
function init(){
  foreach( array( 'show_user_profile', 'edit_user_profile' ) as $hook )
		add_action( $hook, 'ShowMemberSinceadd_custom_user_profile_fields', 10, 1 );
}
/**
 * Output table
 * @param object $user User object
 */
function add_custom_user_profile_fields( $user ){
	$table =
	'<h3>%1$s</h3>
	<table class="form-table">
		<tr>
			<th>
				%1$s
			</th>
			<td>
				<p>Member since: %2$s</p>
			</td>
		</tr>
	</table>';
	$udata = get_userdata( $user-ID );
	$registered = $udata->user_registered;
	printf(
		$table,
		'Registered',
		date( "M Y", strtotime( $registered ) )
	);
}
?>

Save your file and then upload it to your WordPress site.

Finally you can connect to your WordPress site using a FTP client and then go to /wp-content/plugins/ folder. Select the membersince.php file from your computer and then upload it.

Now you can go to your WordPress plugins page and activate this plugin on your website.

That’s all. Verify everything is working by editing a user profile on in your WordPress admin area, and you will see the user registration date.

Showing member registration date in WordPress user profile

Showing User Registration Date on Your Website

In this method, we will be using a simple shortcode to display any users registration date on the front-end of your WordPress site.

First you will need to add the following code in your theme’s functions.php file or in a site-specific plugin.


function wpb_user_registration_date($atts, $content = null ) { 

$userlogin = shortcode_atts( array(
'user' => FALSE,
), $atts );

$uname = $userlogin['user'];     

if ($uname!== FALSE) {             

$user = get_user_by( 'login', $uname );  
if ($user == false) { 

$message ='Sorry no such user found.'; 


} else { 

$udata = get_userdata( $user-ID );
$registered = $udata->user_registered;

$message =	'Member since: ' . date( "d F Y", strtotime( $registered ) );

}
	
} else { 

$message = 'Please provide a username.'; 

} 

return $message; 

} 

add_shortcode('membersince', 'wpb_user_registration_date');

Next, you can display a user’s registration date by simply using the shortcode like this:

[membersince user=peter]

Replace peter with the username that you want to show.

We hope this article helped you show registration date in WordPress user profiles. You may also want to see our tutorial on how to add additional user profile fields in WordPress registration.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post How to Show User Registration Date in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

How to Spread The Holiday Spirit with Xmas Widget in WordPress

Do you want to show personalized holiday greetings on your website? One of our users recently asked if there was a way to add a Christmas card in WordPress? We did some research and found an easy solution. In this article, we will show you… Read More »

The post How to Spread The Holiday Spirit with Xmas Widget in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

Do you want to show personalized holiday greetings on your website? One of our users recently asked if there was a way to add a Christmas card in WordPress? We did some research and found an easy solution. In this article, we will show you how to spread the holiday spirit with Xmas Widget in WordPress.

Christmas widget plugin for WordPress

What is Xmas Widget for WordPress?

Xmas Widget is a premium WordPress plugin that allows you to display beautiful holiday greetings on your website. It is fully customizable, and you can add your own greetings, background images, and control animations like snow fall and snow accumulation.

While the name says Xmas Widget, you can display it anywhere on your WordPress site including posts and pages. It is fully responsive, and you can also manually adjust its width if you want to.

Most importantly, it works with all themes and plugins.

Xmas Widget can be used to just simply greet the users, or you can use it to greet and tell users about special offers on your website.

Preview of a christmas greeting

Setting up Xmas Widget in WordPress

First you will need to purchase the Xmas Widget plugin. Prices start from $14.99 with one year of support and updates.

WPBeginner users can get an exclusive 34% OFF by using the coupon code wpbeginner60.

Note: we don’t get any commission if you buy this plugin. We liked the plugin and asked the author to give our users a discount instead.

After you purchase the plugin, you will need to install and activate the Xmas Widget plugin. Upon activation you need to visit Appearance » Widgets page to setup the plugin.

You will notice that the plugin has added a new sidebar called ‘Xmas Widget Hidden Sidebar’, and a new widget labeled Xmas Widget. Simply add Xmas Widget to the sidebar where you want to display holiday greetings.

Widgets page after installing Xmas Widget

You will be asked to provide your plugin license key. After verification, you will be able to see widget options.

Xmas Widget settings

First you need to provide a title for your widget. After that you need to enter your greeting message in the content area. You can use HTML in the content area to add links or format text.

Xmas Widget comes with 15 built-in backgrounds that you can choose from. You can also use your own background colors if you want. There are five choices for text fonts and unlimited colors.

You can also add an icon and adjust its position and appearance. Lastly, you can enable Snow build up and Snow animation option. These options would show snow fall animation on your Xmas widget.

Don’t forget to click on the save button to store your widget settings. You can now visit your website to see the Xmas Widget in action.

Preview of Xmas Widget

Add Xmas Widget in WordPress Posts or Pages

As we mentioned earlier, you can add Xmas widget to your WordPress posts and pages as well. Here is how you can do that.

Simply go to Appearance » Widgets page. Add Xmas Widget to ‘Xmas Widget Hidden Sidebar’.

Now you need to setup the widget options like you did earlier and save your widget settings. At the end of the widget, you will find a shortcode like this:

[xmas id=”3″ width=”250px”]

Copy and paste this shortcode to any WordPress page or post. You can even adjust the width of the greeting message to meet your needs.

Xmas Widget in a WordPress post

That’s all, we hope this article helped you spread the holiday spirit with Xmas Widget on your WordPress site. You may also want to see our guide on how add points system in WordPress to ignite user engagement.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post How to Spread The Holiday Spirit with Xmas Widget in WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

RFC: Server-side Image and Graphics Processing with .NET Core and ASP.NET 5

image

The .NET Core and the Core Libraries are open source and run on Windows, Mac, and Linux. In fact, you can run them with support, today, in production on Windows and Linux (Mac is for development, not production).

Head over to http://get.asp.net to get ASP.NET 5 with .NET Core on any platform. Also get the free cross platform editor Visual Studio Code as well.

Because .NET Core runs anywhere, there are things that it doesn’t have. It doesn’t have a UI layer (no WinForms, for example, because that makes no sense on Linux) or Registry Access (that’s only on Windows, so it’s simply omitted). While these omissions make sense, others don’t exist because of lack of times, changing priorities, or peoplepower.

Currently, as of the time of this blog post’s writing, .NET Core has no good built-in option for image resizing or image generation/creation. There is no System.Drawing because there is no Win32 GDI. There are some options, that I’ll point out later, but this clearly hasn’t been a priority so it’s not done yet. There has been some work on System.Drawing.Graphics, but it seems stalled.

Nathanael Jones is the very accomplished author of ImageResizer and the primary at Imazen, an imaging software company. I’ve talked about ImageResizer before, it’s fantastic. Nathanael has been pushing hard to get folks at Microsoft to commit to a story around Server-side Graphics in ASP.NET 5 and recently updated his own roadmap with respect to ImageResizer and the new ASP.NET 5 (that runs on .NET Core as well as the full .NET Framework). Take a moment and read it, there’s a lot there. Concerns about how to call native code, how to distribute managed code that has to call native code, and lots more. I’ve worked with Nathanael for the last year trying to work out some way to solve this problem but it hasn’t worked out well. Big company, sigh.

Another library in the .NET imaging space is called ImageProcessor by James M. South. Jim also wants to solve the program of server side image manipulation. He’s currently working on a re-write of his ImageProcessor as a cross-platform library and I’m sure he would appreciate your help.

Jim himself says:

Is this wise? Honestly… I don’t know. I could be writing code that may be suddenly obsolete. There has been little feedback on questions I’ve asked but it’s a nice learning process if anything and I will definitely be releasing the code for consumption.

Over in the Microsoft corefxlab repo Jim has asked some questions and tried to push as well, but the issue is currently closed. Fortunately it is just closed for lack of interest. Krzysztof Cwalina from Microsoft says:

We have nobody working actively on this. It’s a interesting problem space, but it does not align with our current priorities. We have nobody working actively on this. It’s a interesting problem space, but it does not align with our current priorities.

Enter, you, us, the community. Jim has asked for help, and I’m also asking for help. Is Server-Side graphics manipulation in ASP.NET 5 important? Jim asks:

Please… Spread the word, contribute algorithms, submit performance improvements, unit tests. Help me set up CI for nightly releases.

Performance is a biggie, if you know anything about the new vector types and can apply some fancy new stuff with that it would be awesome.

There’s a lot of developers out there who could write this stuff a lot better and faster than I and I would love to see what we collectively can come up with so please, if you can help in any way it would be most welcome and beneficial for all.

So, two things.

First, head over to https://github.com/JimBobSquarePants/ImageProcessor/tree/V3 and talk to James M. South on Twitter. If you can, offer support. Perhaps help with a AppVeyor setup, or offer your own CI server for builds. Do you have a need for server-side image work now or perhaps you have a cache of unit tests? See what you can offer. Even if you’re a First Timer to Open Source.

Second, if you want to work on it, either with James, or with Microsoft, check out the closed issues on GitHub at https://github.com/dotnet/corefxlab/issues/86#issuecomment-158459437 and engage there. It’d be awesome to see this problem solved.


Sponsor: Thanks to RedGate for sponsoring the blog this week. They’re offering a free .NET eBook! Discover 52 tips to improve your .NET performance! Our new eBook features dozens of tips and tricks to boost .NET performance. With contributions from .NET experts around the world, you’ll have a faster app in no time. Download your free copy.


© 2015 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     
image

The .NET Core and the Core Libraries are open source and run on Windows, Mac, and Linux. In fact, you can run them with support, today, in production on Windows and Linux (Mac is for development, not production).

Head over to http://get.asp.net to get ASP.NET 5 with .NET Core on any platform. Also get the free cross platform editor Visual Studio Code as well.

Because .NET Core runs anywhere, there are things that it doesn't have. It doesn't have a UI layer (no WinForms, for example, because that makes no sense on Linux) or Registry Access (that's only on Windows, so it's simply omitted). While these omissions make sense, others don't exist because of lack of times, changing priorities, or peoplepower.

Currently, as of the time of this blog post's writing, .NET Core has no good built-in option for image resizing or image generation/creation. There is no System.Drawing because there is no Win32 GDI. There are some options, that I'll point out later, but this clearly hasn't been a priority so it's not done yet. There has been some work on System.Drawing.Graphics, but it seems stalled.

Nathanael Jones is the very accomplished author of ImageResizer and the primary at Imazen, an imaging software company. I've talked about ImageResizer before, it's fantastic. Nathanael has been pushing hard to get folks at Microsoft to commit to a story around Server-side Graphics in ASP.NET 5 and recently updated his own roadmap with respect to ImageResizer and the new ASP.NET 5 (that runs on .NET Core as well as the full .NET Framework). Take a moment and read it, there's a lot there. Concerns about how to call native code, how to distribute managed code that has to call native code, and lots more. I've worked with Nathanael for the last year trying to work out some way to solve this problem but it hasn't worked out well. Big company, sigh.

Another library in the .NET imaging space is called ImageProcessor by James M. South. Jim also wants to solve the program of server side image manipulation. He's currently working on a re-write of his ImageProcessor as a cross-platform library and I'm sure he would appreciate your help.

Jim himself says:

Is this wise? Honestly... I don't know. I could be writing code that may be suddenly obsolete. There has been little feedback on questions I've asked but it's a nice learning process if anything and I will definitely be releasing the code for consumption.

Over in the Microsoft corefxlab repo Jim has asked some questions and tried to push as well, but the issue is currently closed. Fortunately it is just closed for lack of interest. Krzysztof Cwalina from Microsoft says:

We have nobody working actively on this. It's a interesting problem space, but it does not align with our current priorities. We have nobody working actively on this. It's a interesting problem space, but it does not align with our current priorities.

Enter, you, us, the community. Jim has asked for help, and I'm also asking for help. Is Server-Side graphics manipulation in ASP.NET 5 important? Jim asks:

Please... Spread the word, contribute algorithms, submit performance improvements, unit tests. Help me set up CI for nightly releases.

Performance is a biggie, if you know anything about the new vector types and can apply some fancy new stuff with that it would be awesome.

There's a lot of developers out there who could write this stuff a lot better and faster than I and I would love to see what we collectively can come up with so please, if you can help in any way it would be most welcome and beneficial for all.

So, two things.

First, head over to https://github.com/JimBobSquarePants/ImageProcessor/tree/V3 and talk to James M. South on Twitter. If you can, offer support. Perhaps help with a AppVeyor setup, or offer your own CI server for builds. Do you have a need for server-side image work now or perhaps you have a cache of unit tests? See what you can offer. Even if you're a First Timer to Open Source.

Second, if you want to work on it, either with James, or with Microsoft, check out the closed issues on GitHub at https://github.com/dotnet/corefxlab/issues/86#issuecomment-158459437 and engage there. It'd be awesome to see this problem solved.


Sponsor: Thanks to RedGate for sponsoring the blog this week. They're offering a free .NET eBook! Discover 52 tips to improve your .NET performance! Our new eBook features dozens of tips and tricks to boost .NET performance. With contributions from .NET experts around the world, you’ll have a faster app in no time. Download your free copy.



© 2015 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

How to Restore a WordPress Site with Just a Database Backup

We always recommend our users to make complete WordPress backups on a regular basis. But what if you unknowingly used one of the free plugins that only make database backups? In this article, we will show you how to restore a WordPress site with just… Read More »

The post How to Restore a WordPress Site with Just a Database Backup appeared first on WPBeginner.

We always recommend our users to make complete WordPress backups on a regular basis. But what if you unknowingly used one of the free plugins that only make database backups? In this article, we will show you how to restore a WordPress site with just a database backup. It will not be a complete restore, but we will show you how you can minimize the damage.

Recovering a WordPress site from a database backup alone

Getting Started

For the sake of this tutorial, we are assuming that you have your WordPress database backup in a zip file. If you do not have one yet, here is how to make a WordPress database backup manually.

If you are recovering from a bad experience with your web hosting provider, then it is probably the time to find a better host. We have hand picked some of the best WordPress hosting providers. These are the companies that we have worked with and trust with our own projects.

Also see: 7 Key Indicators when you should switch your WordPress hosting.

Preparing to Restore WordPress Database Backup

First, you will need to create a new database. Simply login to your cPanel account and click on MySQL Databases under the Database section.

MySQL databases in cPanel

Next, provide a name for your database and then click on create database button.

Creating new MySQL database

Now that you have created a database, you need a MySQL user who will be assigned all privileges to work on your newly created database.

On the same MySQL databases page, scroll down to MySQL users section and add a new user.

Adding a new MySQL user

Provide a username and a strong password for your database user and then click on create user button.

Next, you need to add this user to the MySQL database. Scroll down to ‘Add user to database’ section and select the user along with the database from the drop down menus and then click on the add button.

Adding a user to database

Your new database is now ready for WordPress.

Importing WordPress Database Backup

First you need to visit the cPanel dashbaord. Under the databases section, you need to click on phpMyAdmin.

Launching phpMyAdmin from cPanel

On then next step, select the database you created earlier on the phpMyAdmin page and then click on the Import button.

Now you need to click on the choose file button to upload your WordPress database backup file. Simply click on the go button at the bottom of the page to start importing.

importdb

You will see a success message when the import job is finished.

You have successfully imported your WordPress database. Now the next step is to install WordPress using your new database.

Restoring Your WordPress Site

For a manual restore of WordPress, you will need to manually install WordPress on your server. Visit our step by step WordPress installation tutorial and jump to the section ‘how to install WordPress using FTP’ for detailed instructions.

During the installation, when you reach ‘create a configuration file’ step. Enter the database name and user you created earlier.

Creating configuration file step during WordPress installation

You will now see a message that WordPress can connect to your database, and you can run the installation now.

Clicking on the install button will now show you the ‘Already Installed’ message.

Already installed message

That’s all you can now proceed to login to your WordPress site.

Restoration Troubleshooting

Since you do not have your old WordPress files, there will be several things missing. Some of them can be easily restored while others will be a bit difficult. We will go through all of them one by one.

1. Theme

Simply install a fresh copy of your old WordPress theme. If you made direct changes to your theme files, then all those changes will be gone.

You will have to go through theme options to set it up the way it was before.

2. Widgets

Widgets play an important role in WordPress themes. Luckily, they are stored in your WordPress database and switching to your old theme will restore some of your widgets.

You can always go to Appearance » Widgets to add and rearrange widgets in your sidebars.

Some WordPress plugins come with their own widgets. In order to use those widgets, you will first need to install and activate those plugins.

3. Permalinks

Your site’s permalink structure is also stored in database, and it will be automatically restored. However, if you are seeing 404 errors on front-end of your site, then you need to refresh permalink settings.

Simply go to Settings » Permalinks and click on the save changes button without changing anything. This will refresh your WordPress url structure.

4. Plugins

WordPress stores a record of your site’s active plugins. When you visit the plugins page for the first time, WordPress will show you a list of errors for each plugin that was in the database but is not installed anymore.

Deactivated plugins

Copy all the plugin names and start installing and activating them one by one.

Recovering Lost Images for your WordPress Site

Finding and replacing lost images on your website would be the trickiest part of the recovery. Depending on how much content and images you have, this can take a long time.

Unfortunately, there is no easy way around it. You will have to use a variety of tools to extract your images from different sources. Your chances of recovering all images are fairly low.

1. Look in Your Browser Caches

If you have recently lost your website, then you can look into your browser cache.

Firefox users can download CacheViewer2 add-on to easily find images from their website stored in browser cache.

Finding cached images in Firefox

You can just right click on an image and select save as from the menu.

Google Chrome users on Windows can try Chrome Cache Viewer.

Google Chrome users on Mac will be out of luck. We were unable to find any reasonable solution to browse, preview, and save image from Google Chrome cache on Mac.

2. Look for Your Images in Web Caches

There are several web services that keep cached versions of websites. You can start by looking for your images in Google’s image search. Simply enter your site’s URL and you will be able to see images Google found on your website.

Finding your images in Google Image search

You can click on an image to see a larger preview and save the image.

If you are restoring a much older site and can’t find images on Google or Bing, then you can try Archive.org. It is a non-profit organization that stores snapshots of websites for historical purposes.

Internet Archive Way Back Machine

Finding and Replacing Images on Your Website

If you did not have much content on your old site, then you can manually replace images in your posts. However, if you have a lot of content then finding and replacing images manually will be difficult.

Here is how you can easily locate broken images and replace them.

First, you need to install and activate the Broken Link Checker plugin. Upon activation, simply go to Tools » Broken Links Checker page. The plugin will show you a list of all broken links on your site.

Find and replace missing images in WordPress

Broken images are also considered broken links, so they will appear in the list as well. You can click on the link text column to sort the broken links list to show images first.

Now you can replace the images that you have recovered by editing posts. For the images that you were not able to recover, you can either try to recreate them or simply unlink them.

Bonus Tip

It will be hard to recover all your lost data. Your site may even show errors and affect user experience. This is why you see many experts strongly urging you to set up automatic backups.

We recommend using BackupBuddy. It is a premium WordPress backup plugin with easy restore options and the ability to automatically create and save your backups on the cloud.

That’s all, we hope this article helped you restore your WordPress site from database backup. You may also want to see our list of 13 vital tips and hacks to protect your WordPress admin area.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post How to Restore a WordPress Site with Just a Database Backup appeared first on WPBeginner.

Black Friday / Cyber Monday 2015 WordPress Deals – Big Savings

It’s that time of the year again, where we share the best Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals on your favorite WordPress products. This is the best time to buy WordPress plugins, themes, and hosting because all providers usually offer their best deal of the… Read More »

The post Black Friday / Cyber Monday 2015 WordPress Deals – Big Savings appeared first on WPBeginner.

It’s that time of the year again, where we share the best Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals on your favorite WordPress products. This is the best time to buy WordPress plugins, themes, and hosting because all providers usually offer their best deal of the year. To help you locate those deals, we have hand-picked some of the best WordPress Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals for 2015.

Black Friday Deals for WordPress

These offers are for LIMITED TIME only. We’ve indicated the expiration date next to each offer.

Also make sure you bookmark this page because we will be updating it throughout the week as we find new deals.

Get 35% OFF OptinMonster

OptinMonster

OptinMonster is the best plugin for growing your email list. It is created by Syed Balkhi, founder of WPBeginner. We use it on our site and have seen as high as 600% increase in our subscriber growth.

There are tons of other case studies like Yoast doubling his signups and adding 10,000 subscribers in a month and more.

OptinMonster allows you to create beautiful popups, slide-in forms, floating bars, full screen welcome gates, and several other high-converting optin forms. It comes with great features like built-in analytics, A/B testing, exit-intent, smart user and page targeting, and much more.

Use the coupon code: BF2015 to get 35% OFF OptinMonster.

Get 35% Off OptinMonster

This deal is good till December 1, 2015.

Get 35% OFF Envira Gallery

Envira Gallery

Envira Gallery is the best responsive WordPress gallery plugin in the market. Unlike, other gallery plugins which slow down your website, Envira is blazing fast and highly optimized for speed. It is packed with features like Albums, Lightbox, drag and drop builder, gallery templates, full screen slideshows, WooCommerce integration, watermarking, and much more.

Use the coupon code: BF2015 to get 35% OFF on all Envira Gallery plans.

Get 35% Off Envira Gallery

This deal is good till December 1, 2015.

Get 35% OFF Soliloquy

Soliloquy

Soliloquy is the best WordPress slider plugin in the market. It is super-easy to use and packed with great features like carousel, fullscreen sliders, featured content, Instagram, ready to use themes, and much more.

Use the coupon code: BF2015 to get 35% OFF on all Soliloquy plans.

Get 35% Off Soliloquy

This deal is good till December 1, 2015.

Get Over 50% OFF BlueHost

Bluehost 2.95 Special

Bluehost is one of the official WordPress hosting providers. This Black Friday they will be offering amazing discount deals throughout the week.

Get BlueHost Now

This deal is valid from November 27th till December 1, 2015.

Note: Their best deal will be on CyberMonday, where the price goes down even further, and you can get hosting for $2.95 / month.

Get 70% OFF Siteground

Siteground

Siteground is one of the leading WordPress hosting providers. They are offering discount deals upto 70% OFF during black friday and cyber monday deals.

This deal is good from November 27 till November 30, 2015.

Get 70% OFF Siteground

Note: We use Siteground to host our popular List25 site (see case study).

Get 25% OFF Beaver Builder

Beaver Builder

Beaver Builder is the best WordPress page builder plugin in the market. It’s 100% drag-and-drop and makes it really easy for you to customize your site.

Unlike other plugins, it is actually quite fast and easy for beginners to use. In our opinion, it is by far the best option in the market.

This holidays, they’re offering a 25% discount.

Use the coupon code: HAPPYHOLIDAYS

Get 25% OFF BeaverBuilder

Note: This deal is good from 27 November to 30 November.

Get HostGator for $2.99

HostGator logo

HostGator is one of the most popular web hosting company, and they are the one that we use to host WPBeginner. Our founder, Syed Balkhi, has been a HostGator customer since 2007.

They’re offering WPBeginner users an exclusive hosting deal starting at $2.99 / month.

Use the coupon code: wpbeginner

Get the best HostGator deal in the market

Get Upto 50% OFF iThemes and BackupBuddy

iThemes Toolkit

Our friends over at iThemes are offering 40% off everything on their site. They’re the folks behind BackupBuddy, the best WordPress backup plugin among several other top plugins and themes.

Use the coupon code: JINGLEWP40

Get 40% OFF iThemes Now

Note: If you’re buying their full toolkit which includes everything iThemes make, then you can get 50% off using the coupon code: SAVEBIG50

This offer expires on November 30th, 2015.

Get 30% OFF WPEngine

WPEngine

WPEngine is one of the best managed WordPress hosting service provider. They are offering a 30% discount for initial payments on shared plans.

Use the coupon code: WPECW30

Get 30% OFF WPEngine

Get 25% OFF MaxCDN

MaxCDN

MaxCDN is the industry leader in content delivery network. We use MaxCDN to improve performance of all our websites including WPBeginner (See why you need a CDN Infographic ).

Get MaxCDN Now

Get 20% OFF CodeGuard

CodeGuard

CodeGuard is a website backup service that can automatically backup your WordPress site and save it on the cloud. They are offering a limited time 20% discount to WPBeginner readers.

No coupon code required simply click on the link below.

Get 20% Off Codeguard

Get 40% OFF CSS Hero

CSS Hero

CSS Hero allows you to customize any WordPress theme. See our CSS Hero review and how it makes WordPress design customization easy.

Use Coupon Code: WPBeginner

Get 40% OFF CSS Hero Now

Get 25% OFF Gravity Forms

Gravity Forms

Gravity forms is the best form management solution in WordPress. You can use it to generate leads, accept payments, accept guest posts, and much more. They have a special 25% off discount for WPBeginner users.

Use coupon code: wpbeginner

Get Gravity Forms Now

40% OFF Themify

Themify Home

Themify, a premium WordPress theme company and friends of WPBeginner are offering 40% OFF on all their themes. They are also offering a $100 discount on their life time club memberships. Users can also signup for their iPad giveaway.

Use coupon code: BLACKFRIDAY

Get Themify Now

This deal is good for November 27 to November 30 2015.

Get 40% OFF Headway Themes

Headway Themes

Headway Themes is a premium WordPress theme shop. This season they are offering a 40% discount on all their themes.

Use coupon code: headway40

Get 40% Off Headway Themes Now

This deal is good from November 26 until November 30 2015.

Get 30% OFF AffiliateWP

AffiliateWP

AffiliateWP is one of the best affiliate tracking and management plugin for WordPress. They are offering a 30% discount during cyber weekend.

Use coupon code: BFCM2015

Get AffiliateWP Now

This deal is good from November 27 to November 30 2015.

Get 25% OFF CSSIgniter

CSSIgniter

CSSIgniter is a premium WordPress theme shop that allows you to get access to all of their themes for just $49 per year.

They’re offering a 25% discount this Black Friday bringing their already low prices even lower.

Use the coupon code: BLACKFRIDAY

Get 25% OFF CSSIgniter Now

Note: This offer expires on Nov 30th, 2015.

Get 30% OFF Easy Digital Downloads

Easy Digital Downloads

Easy Digital Downloads is one of the best eCommerce platform for WordPress. They are offering a special 30% discount on all purchases during cyber weekend.

Use coupon code: BFCM2015

Get Easy Digital Downloads

This deal is good from November 27 to November 30 2015.

Get 40% OFF SlideDeck

SlideDeck Web Screenshot

SlideDeck is another popular WordPress slider plugin that’s offering a 40% discount on all plans.

Use the coupon code: SDBF40

Get 40% off SlideDeck

Get 35% OFF ThemeIsle

Themeisle logo

ThemeIsle, a fast growing WordPress theme provider is offering 35% off all their products for Black Friday.

Use the coupon code: TIBF2015

Get 35% OFF ThemeIsle

Get 50% OFF ThemeFurnace

ThemeFurnace

ThemeFurnace, a WordPress theme shop ran by our friend Oliver Dale is offering 50% off on all their WordPress themes.

Use the coupon code: BLACKFRIDAY

Get 50% off ThemeFurance

Note: this offer expires on December 1st.

Get 40% OFF S2Member

s2member

S2Member is one of the most popular WordPress membership plugin. For this black friday, they’re offering 40% off their paid version.

Use the coupon code: BLACK40-A:2655

Get 40% OFF S2Member Now

Note: this offer expires on November 30th.

Get 20% OFF WP Migrate DB Pro

WP Migrate DB Pro

WP Migrate DB Pro is one of the most loved tools by the WordPress developer community because it takes the pain out of moving WordPress databases.

This black Friday, they’re offering 20% off discount on the plugin.

No Code is Necessary.

Get 20% OFF WP Migrate DB Pro

Note: Offer expires on November 30th.

Get 50% OFF SEMrush

SEMrush

SEMrush is the best online competitive analysis tool in the market. They are offering an exclusive 50% discount to WPBeginner users.

No code is necessary.

Get 50% OFF SEMrush

Note: Offer expires on November 30th.

Get 50% OFF EventEspresso

Event Espresso

EventEspresso provides an easy way to manage events from your WordPress site. They are offering a whopping 50% discount.

No code is necessary

Get 50% OFF EventEspresso

Note: Offer expires on December 1st.

Get 50% OFF aThemes

aThemes

aThemes is a premium WordPress theme shop. This season they have announced an amazing 50% discount on all their themes.

Use the coupon code: BLACKFRIDAY15

Get 50% OFF aThemes

Note: Offer expires on November 30th.

Get 30% OFF WeDevs

WeDevs Logo

WeDevs is a premium WordPress plugin and theme shop. They are offering a 30% discount on all products except extensions.

Use this coupon code: Thanks30

Get 30% Off WeDevs

Note: Offer expires on November 30th.

Get 60% Off Xmas Widget

Xmas Widget

Xmas Widget offers unique way to spread the holiday spread while boosting user engagement. They are offering 60% discounts to WPBeginner users.

Use this coupon code: wpbeginner60

Get 60% off Xmas Widget

Get 50% Off Tesla Themes

Tesla Themes

Tesla Themes is a premium WordPress theme shop. They are offering a whopping 50% discount on all their themes and subscription plans.

Use this coupon code: 50OFF

Get 50% Off Tesla Themes

Note: This deal is good from 26th November, 2015 to 2nd December, 2015.

Get 40% Off Magic Toolbox

magictoolbox

Magic Toolbox offers a beautiful way to zoom in images. They are offering a 40% discount on their Magic360 and Magic Slide products.

Use this coupon code for Magic360: black360

Use this coupon code for Magic Slide: blackslide

Get 40% off Magic Toolbox

Note: This deal is good from 26-30 November 2015.

Get Any Theme for $19 from MyThemeShop

MyThemeShop

MyThemeShop is a premium WordPress theme shop offering beautiful WordPress themes. All their themes are available at $19 for limited time.

Use this coupon code: TheMTSDeal

Get $19 per theme from MyThemeShop

Note: This deal is good from 23rd November to 7th December 2015.

Get 35% OFF ThirstyAffiliates

ThirstyAffiliates

ThirstyAffiliates is a must have WordPress plugin for affiliate marketers. They are offering 35% OFF the entire plugin and addons.

Use the coupon code: BF2015

Get 35% OFF ThirstyAffiliates

Note: This deal is good until December 1st, 2015

Get 30% OFF Dev7Studios

Dev7Studios

Dev7Studios is offering 30% OFF all their plugins including the popular NivoSlider and several others.

Use the coupon code: BFCM2015

Get 30% OFF Dev7Studios

******* END Of DEALS *******

That’s all for now. We will be adding more deals and updating this page throughout the week. Aside from these, we also have tons of other deals and discounts for WPBeginner readers.

Hopefully, you can take advantage of some of these limited time deals. Have a happy thanksgiving.

P.S. If you’re a WordPress company offering discount or know of one that is having a deal, then please let us know, so we can update this article.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post Black Friday / Cyber Monday 2015 WordPress Deals – Big Savings appeared first on WPBeginner.

How to Auto-Schedule Your WordPress Blog Posts

By default WordPress allows you to schedule your posts to be published later. But we’ve often seen people forgetting to schedule their posts. Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a to automatically schedule WordPress posts? In this article, we will show you how to… Read More »

The post How to Auto-Schedule Your WordPress Blog Posts appeared first on WPBeginner.

By default WordPress allows you to schedule your posts to be published later. But we’ve often seen people forgetting to schedule their posts. Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a to automatically schedule WordPress posts? In this article, we will show you how to auto-schedule social sharing for your WordPress posts.

Auto-scheduling WordPress posts

Why Auto-Schedule WordPress Posts?

Most bloggers schedule posts to be published at a fixed time. However, sometimes you may forget to schedule them.

One way to deal with this situation is to use an editorial calendar that shows you when you have posts scheduled to be published.

We use Edit Flow on our websites to manage our editorial workflow.

But wouldn’t it be great if you could just setup an automatic system that can schedule blog posts for you? Think of a feature like Buffer or HootSuite auto-schedule for your social media.

Publish to schedule is a WordPress plugin that can automatically schedule your posts.

Let’s see how you can set it up and configure it.

Setting up Publish to Schedule

First thing you need to do is install and activate the Publish to Schedule plugin. Upon activation, simply go to Settings » Publish to Schedule to configure plugin settings.

Choose days and number of posts to publish

First you need to choose the number of posts to publish on each day. Enter 0 for the days when you don’t want to publish any posts.

After that you need to choose the time interval. By default this schedule is set to 24 hours, but you can change it based on your needs.

The plugin will automatically do the scheduling. You can see when your post will be scheduled to appear, or you can choose not to see it. Select all information or just do the magic under the information section.

Choose how much information you want to see next to publish button

Don’t forget to click on the save all changes button to store your settings.

Writing Posts with Publish to Schedule Plugin

Create a new WordPress post or edit an existing draft. You will notice some changes under the publish metabox.

Publish meta box with Publish to Post plugin

The most obvious different is the replacement of publish button with Pub. to Schedule button.

If you selected to show information in the plugin settings, then you will see when your post will be scheduled as you press the publish to schedule button.

Remember, you can always override this schedule by defining your own schedule like you would normally do.

That’s all, we hope this article helped you auto-schedule your WordPress blog posts. You may also want to see our tips on mastering the WordPress visual editor.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

The post How to Auto-Schedule Your WordPress Blog Posts appeared first on WPBeginner.