Switching Away from Disqus Review – Increased Comments by 304%

We switched away from Disqus about 2 months ago. Many of you noticed this change and asked us to write a Disqus review explaining why did we switch. After using Disqus for about a year, we noticed several drawbacks that forced us to switch back… Read More »

To leave a comment please visit Switching Away from Disqus Review – Increased Comments by 304% on WPBeginner.

We switched away from Disqus about 2 months ago. Many of you noticed this change and asked us to write a Disqus review explaining why did we switch. After using Disqus for about a year, we noticed several drawbacks that forced us to switch back to WordPress comments. In this Disqus review, we will highlight the reasons why we switched and how it helped increase our comments by 304%.

Disqus Review - Why we Swithced Away

We started using Disqus in April 2014. We switched away several months ago. We really appreciate your patience and our apologies for taking so long to write about this. We know several of you have been asking about why we switched away from Disqus, so here goes our final Disqus review.

Why Did We Switch away from Disqus?

There were several reasons why we switched away from Disqus.

Inserting Affiliate Links without Permission

Disqus offers publishers ability to earn little extra $$ if you enable Promoted Discovery which shows sponsored stories in the related posts section that Disqus can add.

Since we didn’t want any advertisement from them, we had all the settings unchecked.

However we accidentally ran into what they called a “bug” where Disqus was inserting affiliate links in our blog post content without our permission.

Basically Disqus has a partnership with Viglink which looks through your content and change any link that they’re partnered with to an affiliate link.

We caught this when we noticed Viglink referring sales to OptinMonster from our site WPBeginner. How ironic since both of them are our sites. Hmmm.

After looking into it, we reported the problem to Disqus which they fixed and called it a “bug”.

We were quite disappointed in the way this was handled. We’re not sure how much money Disqus made through this affiliate-injection bug, and how widespread was this. There was no public disclosure announcement about this, and we definitely didn’t get any $$ credit for advertising that they were placing on our site for who knows how long.

That just left a bad taste in the mouth.

For more details on the bug, you can see our video here.

Sponsored Comments

We learned about this through our friend Michael Hyatt when he noticed sponsored comments showing up on his site without his permission.

He reported that you can’t opt-out without assistance from Disqus Support team.

So we reached out to Disqus for an official response regarding this issue.

They confirmed that there was no easy way for an individual to opt-out without reaching out to their support team. Since there were specific criteria for Sponsored Comments, most users will not be affected by this.

Great! As if fighting spam comments weren’t hard enough already, now we have to keep an eye out for Disqus and quickly reach out to them if they enable sponsored comments on our site. No thanks.

Matt Mullenweg, founder of WordPress sums it up the best in his response to the Disqus announcement: “It’s not comment spam if we’re getting paid for it!”

Note: during this sponsored comments fiasco, we discovered a setting that’s auto-enabled for cookie tracking. It’s located in the “Advanced” settings tab. Make sure you disable it if you’re using Disqus.

Significant Decrease in Comment Engagement

When we enabled Disqus, few readers complained that Disqus makes it harder for guest commenting. Since Disqus was being widely used across several top sites, we didn’t pay huge attention to those complaints.

Overtime, our comment engagement dropped significantly. After disabling Disqus, we saw our users starting to leave more comments. Since the change, we’ve noticed our comments increased by 304%.

Moderation Interface

We were quite excited about the new moderation interface when we switched, but as we used it more, it wasn’t something our editors liked.

Note: This is completely a personal preference, and we’re there are other users who love the Disqus interface.

What we will miss about Disqus?

While we didn’t like some of Disqus’ business practices, there were few things we will surely miss about the platform.

Scalability and Site Performance

Comments are very resource intensive. If you have a lot of comments on a post, then it will take a long time to load.

If a lot of users are leaving comments at the same time, then it would also impact your server load. The advantage of using a third-party commenting system like Disqus was that you shave that server load off from yours and send it their way.

Even if your site is getting attacked by a malicious user, it won’t impact your server because it has to go through Disqus first. (Note: This is only true, if you have disabled Comment Sync).

Redundancy

The best part about Disqus was that comments were stored on a third-party database which is extremely helpful with redundancy. We’ll definitely miss this.

For now if we ever have to do fail-over, we will simply disable comments until our main servers are back. Although not ideal, this is the simplest option that we have.

What’s Next?

For now, we’re using the default WordPress comments interface. In the past, we’ve tried Disqus and Livefyre, but we have made our way back to WordPress comments because it just seems like the best overall option available.

We’re definitely considering using De:Comments, a WordPress commenting plugin that we reviewed earlier.

The other option is to power up the native WordPress comments with a suite of other functionality plugins like Subscribe to Comments, Reply Notifications, Simple Comment Editing, and possibly few more.

We hope this review explained why we switched away from Disqus. We really appreciate your patience and our apologies for taking so long to write about this. We know several of you have been asking about this change.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

To leave a comment please visit Switching Away from Disqus Review – Increased Comments by 304% on WPBeginner.

How to Verify Your WordPress Site on Pinterest

Do you want Pinterest analytics for your WordPress site? Pinterest analytics help you monitor your site’s performance by showing stats for all images pinned from your site. Recently one of our users asked us for an easy way to verify their WordPress site on Pinterest.… Read More »

To leave a comment please visit How to Verify Your WordPress Site on Pinterest on WPBeginner.

Do you want Pinterest analytics for your WordPress site? Pinterest analytics help you monitor your site’s performance by showing stats for all images pinned from your site. Recently one of our users asked us for an easy way to verify their WordPress site on Pinterest. In this article, we will show you how to verify your WordPress site on Pinterest and get Pinterest analytics.

Verifying your site allows you to get more insights in Pinterest Analytics

Generating Pinterest Verification Code for Your Site

First thing you need to do is login to your Pinterest account and click on your user name. This will bring you to your pins page. Next, click on the gear icon on the top right corner of the screen and then on account settings.

Visiting Pinterest account settings

You need to scroll down on the account settings page to find the website field. Enter your site’s URL and then click on the confirm website button.

Adding your website to Pinterest

A popup will appear on the screen with a single line of code. This code is a meta tag that you need to add on your website. Simply copy it and leave this window open. You will need to come back here to complete the verification.

Pinterest verification code for your WordPress site

Adding Pinterest Verification Code in WordPress

There are two ways you can add the meta tag to your WordPress site. You can directly paste this code in your child theme‘s header.php file just before the </head> tag.

An easier way to add the code on your website is by using the Insert Haders and Footers plugin. Simply install and activate the plugin and visit Settings » Insert Headers & Footers page. Next, paste the Pinterest verification code in the headers section and save your changes.

Insert Pinterest verification code in the header

You now need to switch to the Pinterest verification code popup and click on the finish button. You will see a success message.

You can now see verified Pinterest Analytics for your site, and how it is doing on the Pinterest network. You may also want to add the Pinterest Pin it button to your site to increase exposure.

While we don’t use Pinterest on WPBeginner, we receive a lot of Pinterest traffic on our sister site List25. You can check out List25’s Pinterest page as well.

We hope this article helped you verify your WordPress site on Pinterest. You may also want to see our guide on how to add Pinterest Pin it button over images in WordPress.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

To leave a comment please visit How to Verify Your WordPress Site on Pinterest on WPBeginner.

How to Write a Good Blog Comment and Bypass the Spam Filter in WordPress

Have you ever thought about what makes a good blog comment? Want to know of a sure-fire way to bypass the spam comment filter in WordPress? In this article, we will show you how to write a good blog comment and bypass the spam filter… Read More »

To leave a comment please visit How to Write a Good Blog Comment and Bypass the Spam Filter in WordPress on WPBeginner.

Have you ever thought about what makes a good blog comment? Want to know of a sure-fire way to bypass the spam comment filter in WordPress? In this article, we will show you how to write a good blog comment and bypass the spam filter in WordPress.

Comments are a great way to interact with the blogs you read. Most site owners love and crave comments. In their eyes, comments show that readers found their content engaging and useful.

Sadly, comments are now being used by spammers and bots as a promotional mechanism rather than a micro-conversation tool. We get tons of comments here on WPBeginner, and those that stand out share several common traits.

Let’s take a look at how to write a good blog comment and get noticed.

1. Why Do You Want to Comment?

Why?

Before you leave a comment, you need to ask yourself why do you want to leave that comment? Some people want to become friends with the blog owner to explore networking opportunities. Others may just want to say thank you, while some might disagree and want to express their own views.

Think out loud what you want your comment to accomplish before you write it. This will help you gather your thoughts more precisely and will allow you to be more eloquent.

2. Be Respectful and Courteous

Respect

It goes without saying that if you want to be heard and noticed, then you should be polite, respectful, and kind.

Even if you disagree with the post, you should express your views without being rude to the site owner or other users.

Remember the site owner can delete your comment, mark it as spam, and/or block your IP altogether.

Friends and good manners will carry you where money won’t go.

– Margaret Walker

3. Don’t Comment for a Backlink

Backlink

Comments with backlinks in the message are more likely to be marked as spam.

Some users try to leave signature links to their site in their comments. This is a waste of your time, and more likely than not your comment will be caught by a spam filter or in a moderation queue.

First of all, you need to understand that all links in blog comments are nofollow by default. You will not get the SEO bump that you are hoping for.

Second, why waste your time writing comments when you can get featured on any blog in the world. If you have great writing skills and all you want is publicity, then writing guest posts will benefit you a lot more than leaving backlinks in comments.

If you must leave a link, then make sure that it is relevant to the post. Self-promotional links are usually deleted unless you’re a regular user of the website.

4. Add Value to The Discussion

Add Value

When writing your comment, your #1 goal should be to add value to the original discussion. There are plenty of ways to do that.

For example, if you are commenting on a list post, then add more information about an item already in the list or perhaps suggest an alternative item.

Asking relevant questions can help other readers, and it is also the easiest way to add value to a discussion. However, you need to be smart about it and only ask if you really have a question.

It’s crucial that you read the comments that are already published. This will give you an idea of where the conversation is heading, and you would avoid repeating the things that others have already said.

5. Spellcheck and Proofread

Spellcheck & Proofread

You should never use ALL CAPS in your comment (that’s simply rude).

Some site owners are very strict about grammar and spelling, so you may want to do your best there.

All browsers come with built-in spell-check tools that you can use to correct mistakes as you write. You can also install Chrome extensions like Grammarly or After the Deadline to proofread your comments.

6. Retweet, Share, and Reblog

Share and Reblog

If you think of a post worthy enough of your comment, then why not share it with the rest of the world. Tweet a link to the post or your own comment. You can also share it on Facebook or reblog on your own blog. This also allows you to get more people involved in the discussion.

It also shows the site owner that you liked their article, and you care. It’s one of the great ways to start networking with an influencer and get in their radar.

7. Private Feedback

Feedback

Comments are supposed to be about the article and post you are reading. If you want to address the site owner or have another suggestion, then it’s best to use the contact form instead of leaving it all in the comment.

It’s a bonus when you leave a great comment and then send helpful feedback through the contact form. Two quick touch-points can go long way in helping you get noticed by the writer.

We hope this article helped you learn how to write a good blog comment and hopefully your comments will bypass the spam filters. You may also want to see our free WordPress beginner workshop recordings.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

To leave a comment please visit How to Write a Good Blog Comment and Bypass the Spam Filter in WordPress on WPBeginner.

How to Display Recent Posts in WordPress

Displaying Recent posts often helps your users to visit them easily specially on the sidebar of a single post page. But in some designing processes people want to display recent posts in many different ways. In this post, we will show you various different ways you can display the recent posts in WordPress.

To leave a comment please visit How to Display Recent Posts in WordPress on WPBeginner.

Do you want to show your recent posts in WordPress? Displaying recent posts helps your users find them easily. You can add recent posts in your sidebar, after the end of your post content, inside your post content with a shortcode, in your footer widget areas, and basically anywhere else that you like. In this article, we will show you how to display recent posts in WordPress with a plugin, widget, shortcode, and the manual method with the recent post function.

A WordPress page with recent posts listed

Using The WordPress Recent Posts Widget

WordPress comes with a built-in default widget to display recent posts in your site’s sidebar or any widget ready area. Inside your WordPress admin, simply visit Appearance » Widgets and add Recent Posts widget to a sidebar.

Using the default WordPress recent posts widget

The built-in recent posts widget is very basic. You can provide an alternate title to the widget, show date, and add the number of posts you want to display. Next, click on the save button to store your widget settings.

Using Recent Posts Widget Extended Plugin

As you noticed that the built-in widget we mentioned above is quite limited, and it doesn’t even allow you to show thumbnails or excerpts which is often a priority for users.

What if you wanted to display thumbnails and excerpts with your recent posts? What if you wanted to limit them to specific categories or tags?

Well, that’s when Recent Posts Widget Extended plugin comes in handy.

First thing you need to do is install and activate the WordPress Recent Posts Widget Extended plugin. Upon activation, simply visit Appearance » Widgets and add Recent Posts Extended widget to a sidebar.

Recent posts extended widget settings

Recent Posts Extended widget comes with a lot options and gives you full control on how you want to display recent posts on your WordPress site. You can show thumbnails, excerpts, limit categories and tags, ignore sticky posts, and much more. You can even use the widget to display recent posts from any other post type on your site.

Recent posts with thumbnail and excerpt in  sidebar widget

Displaying Recent Posts in WordPress Using Shortcode

Adding recent posts to a sidebar is fairly easy, but what if you wanted to show recent posts inside a WordPress post or page? The easiest way to display recent posts in WordPress posts and pages is by using shortcodes.

First thing you need to do is install and activate the Display Posts Shortcode plugin. It works out of the box and there are no settings for you to configure.

Simply edit a post or page where you want to display your recent posts. Next, use the shortcode [display-posts] with your own parameters inside the post. The plugin offers a whole range of parameters that you can use with the shortcode. Here are some examples:

Display 5 recent posts with thumbnails and excerpt

[display-posts posts_per_page="5" image_size="thumbnail" include_excerpt="true"]

Display recent pages instead of posts

[display-posts posts_per_page="5" post_type="page"]

Change the order to title instead of date.

[display-posts posts_per_page="5" orderby="title"]

Display recent pages under a specific parent page.

[display-posts posts_per_page="5" post_type="page" post_parent="5"]

For a full list of parameters visit the plugin’s documentation.

You can also use these shortcodes inside a text widget, but first you will need to enable shortcodes in your text widgets by adding this code to your theme’s functions.php file or a site specific plugin.

add_filter('widget_text', 'do_shortcode');

Displaying Recent Posts Manually in WordPress Theme Files

More advanced WordPress users may want to add recent posts directly in their WordPress theme files. There are multiple ways to do this, but the easiest one is to use the built-in WP_Query class. Simply add this code where you want to display the recent posts.

<ul>
// Define our WP Query Parameters
<?php $the_query = new WP_Query( 'posts_per_page=5' ); ?>

// Start our WP Query
<?php while ($the_query -> have_posts()) : $the_query -> the_post(); ?>

// Display the Post Title with Hyperlink
<li><a href="<?php the_permalink() ?>"><?php the_title(); ?></a></li>

// Display the Post Excerpt
<li><?php the_excerpt(__('(more…)')); ?></li>

// Repeat the process and reset once it hits the limit
<?php 
endwhile;
wp_reset_postdata();
?>
</ul>

This code simply displays five most recent posts with their title and excerpt. The WP_Query class has tons of parameters that allows you to customize it any way that you like. For more information please refer to the codex.

We hope that this article helped you learn how to display recent posts in WordPress. If you want to customize the display of your recent posts without writing any code, then you may want to check out CSS Hero, a WordPress plugin that helps make design customization easy – see our full CSS Hero review.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

To leave a comment please visit How to Display Recent Posts in WordPress on WPBeginner.

How to Properly Use the More Tag in WordPress

Do you want to a show a summary of your article on your homepage with a read more link? WordPress comes with two built-in methods that allows you to do that. One of these methods is known as the More Tag. In this article, we… Read More »

To leave a comment please visit How to Properly Use the More Tag in WordPress on WPBeginner.

Do you want to a show a summary of your article on your homepage with a read more link? WordPress comes with two built-in methods that allows you to do that. One of these methods is known as the More Tag. In this article, we will show you how to properly use the More Tag in WordPress.

Adding the More Tag in WordPress

Adding the More Tag in your posts is quite simple. Simply start by writing a new post or edit an existing one.

Once you’re done writing, you will need to click on a line where you would like to end the summary and show a read more link. Next, click on the More Tag button from the toolbar.

Adding the more tag in a WordPress post using the visual editor

You will notice that a dashed line with ‘More’ in the center will appear in your blog post. You can insert the more tag anywhere in the post, like in the mid sentence, in the middle of a paragraph, or after the first paragraph.

If you are using the text editor, then you can use the ‘more’ button in the toolbar or manually enter the more tag like this:

<!--more-->

What’s the Advantage of using More Tag vs Excerpts

Remember earlier we mentioned that WordPress comes with two built-in methods for showing the post summary with read more link. Those methods are More Tag and Excerpts.

You can add an excerpt for any post using the Excerpt box in your post editor screen. If you do not see that box, then click on the screen options tab on the top right hand corner and check the excerpt option.

This will display an excerpt meta box below your post editor.

Excerpt meta box below post editor in WordPress

While excerpts may sound like an easier option, there are two downsides to using an excerpt.

The first is that excerpts are completely theme dependent. If your theme does not use the_excerpt tag, then no matter what you type in the excerpt box, your theme will show the full content of your post on your homepage and archive pages.

The second downside to using excerpts is that they do not show images or any other formatting for that matter. They’re displayed as plain text.

Whereas the More Tag is completely theme independent meaning it will work on all well-coded WordPress themes. Second, it allows you to display images and all post formatting such as links, quotes, bold/italics, etc in your post summary.

What’s the Downside of using More Tag

The biggest downside of using the WordPress More Tag is that it is something you have to manually enter in all of your posts whereas excerpts are automated.

While WordPress allows you to enter a custom excerpts in the excerpt box, it can also auto-generate an excerpt based on your character count.

Depending on your preference, this may be a downside.

The other downside of using a More Tag is if you use a theme that uses excerpts, then it will override the More Tag and provide an excerpt with the length defined by your theme.

Whether you use More Tag or excerpts, it’s important that you show a summary on your homepage and archive pages rather than showing full content. See our article on the topic, full Text vs summary (excerpt) in your WordPress archive pages.

Common WordPress More Tag Problems

The biggest issue we hear with WordPress More Tag not working is when it comes to pages.

By default, you cannot use the More Tag in WordPress pages. However, there is a quick fix that allows you to add read more tag in WordPress pages.

Another common issue is more tag not working on homepage. If you are using a static page as your custom homepage, then the link above should fix the issue.

The only other reason why more tag won’t work on the homepage is if your theme is designed to show excerpts on the front page in which case your more tag is being overridden, and you should use excerpts instead.

We hope this article helped you learn how to properly use the more tag in WordPress. You may also want to check out our CSS Hero, a WordPress plugin that helps make design customization easy – see our full CSS Hero review.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

To leave a comment please visit How to Properly Use the More Tag in WordPress on WPBeginner.

How to Better Manage WordPress Pages with Nested Pages

Do you use pages in WordPress? If so, then you probably understand how frustrating it is to manage a site with a lot of WordPress pages. The default WordPress interface doesn’t allow you to easily reorder your pages, build relationships between them, sort them, etc.… Read More »

To leave a comment please visit How to Better Manage WordPress Pages with Nested Pages on WPBeginner.

Do you use pages in WordPress? If so, then you probably understand how frustrating it is to manage a site with a lot of WordPress pages. The default WordPress interface doesn’t allow you to easily reorder your pages, build relationships between them, sort them, etc. In this article, we will show you how to better manage your WordPress pages with Nested Pages.

Why use Nested Pages?

Nested Pages WordPress Plugin

Nested Pages is the best plugin for managing WordPress pages, and it is completely FREE.

It comes with an intuitive drag-and-drop interface for managing your page structure and page ordering. Nested Pages enhances the quick-edit functionality to make it easy for managing a lot of pages at once.

The sortable tree view of your site’s page structure is a dream come true for folks who’re using WordPress as a CMS.

Aside from these key features, it also automatically generate a native WordPress menu that matches your page structure and allows you to create multiple pages at once which will surely save a lot of time. Not to mention, you can use Nested Pages on any custom post type.

Anyone who runs a WordPress site with a lot of pages will fall in love with Nested Pages immediately.

It’s still shocking that a plugin of this caliber is completely free because the problem it’s solving is totally worth paying for.

If you are just starting out with WordPress, then you might want to read more about the difference between WordPress posts and pages.

How to Use Nested Pages to Manage WordPress Pages

First thing you need to do is install and activate the Nested Pages plugin. Once activated, it works out of the box. You can simply go to the pages screen in your WordPress admin area to see it in action.

Nested Pages

You can simply drag and drop to reorder pages. You can also create child pages by simply moving them below a parent page and then moving them slightly to the right. You can also create new child pages by clicking on the child page button next to any page.

Toolbar next to pages for quick actions

Unlike other page management plugin in WordPress, Nested Pages allows you to keep the coveted quick edit button. The quick edit interface in Nested Pages is cleaner and easy on eyes.

Nested Pages Quick Edit

Creating Navigation Menus Using Nested Pages

Many WordPress sites use pages as their main site structure and add it in their navigation menus. Up until now, this process required multiple steps because you would have to first create the pages, then create a menu, and then add all the pages to it along with reordering them.

Nested Pages plugin makes it super simple. After you have arranged your pages, you can simply check the Sync Menu checkbox. This will replicate your page structure into your navigation menus.

Sync your pages layout with your WordPress navigation menu

You can control how each page appears in the navigation menus without leaving the pages screen. Simply click on the link icon next to a page or click on the Add link button at the top.

This will bring up a popup where you can add a navigation label and URL for the link. You can choose to hide the link in the nested pages or hide it in the menus.

Add link to menu from nested pages screen

Adding Multiple Pages At Once Using Nested Pages

Another great feature of Nested Pages is the ability to quickly create multiple new pages at once. This feature is particularly useful if you already know what your page structure would look like.

You can start adding multiple WordPress pages by simply clicking on the Add multiple button at the top.

Add multiple pages quickly

This will bring up a new popup window where you can provide a page title, select status, author, and template. Click on the plus icon button to add another page. Repeat the process for all the pages you want to create and then click on the add button.

Adding multiple pages in nested pages

Note that the pages you create will be empty, and you will have to edit them individually. Also you cannot set parent or child pages from multiple pages popup. You will have to set them as child or parent when you are done adding them.

Enabling Nested Pages for Other Post Types

You can enable nested pages for any default or custom post types in WordPress. Simply visit Settings » Nested Pages in the WordPress admin and click on the post types tab. Next, select the post types where you want to enable nested pages functionality and then save changes.

Enabling Nested Pages for other post types in WordPress

We hope this article helped you learn how to better manage your WordPress pages with Nested Pages. You may also want to see our guide on how to display a list of child pages for a parent page in WordPress.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

To leave a comment please visit How to Better Manage WordPress Pages with Nested Pages on WPBeginner.

Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro Micro-HDMI not working? Easy fix.

Micro HDMI sucks.This blog post is likely not for you, unless it totally is. Which is why I’m posting it.

My Dad’s Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro was driving him batty for months. It was bugging me even more, as I am the assigned IT manager for my family. I’m sure you are also, as you’re reading this blog, right?

Anyway, I talk this computer up for months, he gets the computer, and it has this tiny Micro-HDMI connector.

Let me just say that Micro-HDMI is the most evil of all display connectors. I mean, it literally does everything wrong.

Micro-HDMI sucks because:

  • Micro-HDMI looks like Micro USB and I can’t explain to my Dad that they are different.
  • Micro-HDMI is the most fragile of all ports. If you blow on it you’ll lose signal.
  • It’s like the tiny shorty soda pop can of Tab. It’s not Diet Coke. It’s not enough. It’s useless.

Which brings me to the point. His didn’t work. Never worked. I tried new drivers, flashing BIOS, new cables, jiggling the connector, everything.

Except the obvious – cutting up the cable.

It turns out that many cables (especially cheap ones from Amazon) don’t expose enough metal to make a decent connection.

Take a razor blade and cut a good millimeter around the cable’s rubber housing to expose more metal.

Yep, I cut the cableCut around the cable. Remove 1mm or so.

Boom. It works immediately. Dad’s thrilled. I’m a good son again and Micro-HDMI continues to suck as a display connector.

Full-sized HDMI or Mini-DP (Display Port) from now on, my friends.

Please, regale me in the comments with tales of why YOU too hate Micro-HTMI, Dear Reader.


© 2015 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Micro HDMI sucks.This blog post is likely not for you, unless it totally is. Which is why I'm posting it.

My Dad's Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro was driving him batty for months. It was bugging me even more, as I am the assigned IT manager for my family. I'm sure you are also, as you're reading this blog, right?

Anyway, I talk this computer up for months, he gets the computer, and it has this tiny Micro-HDMI connector.

Let me just say that Micro-HDMI is the most evil of all display connectors. I mean, it literally does everything wrong.

Micro-HDMI sucks because:

  • Micro-HDMI looks like Micro USB and I can't explain to my Dad that they are different.
  • Micro-HDMI is the most fragile of all ports. If you blow on it you'll lose signal.
  • It's like the tiny shorty soda pop can of Tab. It's not Diet Coke. It's not enough. It's useless.

Which brings me to the point. His didn't work. Never worked. I tried new drivers, flashing BIOS, new cables, jiggling the connector, everything.

Except the obvious - cutting up the cable.

It turns out that many cables (especially cheap ones from Amazon) don't expose enough metal to make a decent connection.

Take a razor blade and cut a good millimeter around the cable's rubber housing to expose more metal.

Yep, I cut the cableCut around the cable. Remove 1mm or so.

Boom. It works immediately. Dad's thrilled. I'm a good son again and Micro-HDMI continues to suck as a display connector.

Full-sized HDMI or Mini-DP (Display Port) from now on, my friends.

Please, regale me in the comments with tales of why YOU too hate Micro-HTMI, Dear Reader.



© 2015 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

How to Add an iframe Border Around a Video Embed

Do you want to add an iframe border around your video embed? Recently a user asked us for a way to add a border around their videos in WordPress. Since you can use both iframe and oEmbed to add videos in WordPress, we will show… Read More »

To leave a comment please visit How to Add an iframe Border Around a Video Embed on WPBeginner.

Do you want to add an iframe border around your video embed? Recently a user asked us for a way to add a border around their videos in WordPress. Since you can use both iframe and oEmbed to add videos in WordPress, we will show you how to add an iframe border around a video embed as well as how to add a border around oEmbed videos in WordPress.

IFRAME Border around WordPress Videos

Adding Border Around iframe Videos in WordPress

First thing you need to do is to open a post or page containing your iframe video embed code. A typical iframe embed code should looks something like this:

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qzOOy1tWBCg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

You can add a border around it by adding inline style to the code like this:

<iframe style="border: 3px solid #EEE;" width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qzOOy1tWBCg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

An iframe video embed with border around it

Simply change the width of the border as well as the color, and you’re done.

While adding an iframe border works, there is actually a better way to add a border around videos in WordPress. That’s by using oEmbed.

Adding Border Around oEmbed Videos in WordPress

WordPress comes with built-in oEmbed support. Basically WordPress allows you to paste the link of the video, and it will automatically get the embed code for them. Now this only works for oEmbed enabled sites such as YouTube, Vimeo, DailyMotion, Hulu, etc. (See: ” title=”How to Easily Embed Videos in WordPress Blog Posts”>how to easily add videos in WordPress using oEmbed)

Now that you know how to add a video with oEmbed, here is how you can add a border around oEmbed videos in WordPress.

When adding a video using oEmbed, simply wrap the URL in span tag with inline style parameters, like this:

<span style="border:3px solid #EEE;">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qzOOy1tWBCg</span>

If you want to add a same border around all video iframes, then it would be best to add a CSS class to your theme’s stylesheet.

.frame-border { 
border:3px solid #EEE; 
}

Now you can use the CSS class in your iframe embed code like this:

<iframe class="frame-border" width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qzOOy1tWBCg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

You can also use the same CSS class in the span tag around your oEmbed video URLs, like this:

<span class="frame-border">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qzOOy1tWBCg</span>

The benefit of using a single CSS class is that if you change themes later, then you can easily change the colors with one click vs going back and editing each video individually.

We hope this article helped you add an iframe border around a video embed in WordPress. You may also want to see these 9 useful YouTube tips to spice up your WordPress site with videos.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

To leave a comment please visit How to Add an iframe Border Around a Video Embed on WPBeginner.

How to use Process Monitor and Process Explorer

I was chatting with Phil Haack today about a weird little bug/feature we were seeing in GitHub for Windows. I don’t have the source code for the application, but I wanted to explore what was going on and get some insight so I could give Phil a decent bug report.

He and I spent some time on Skype sharing screens today and he commented “we should be recording this.” So I went back and did just that.

Please take a moment and Subscribe to my YouTube Channel here: http://youtube.com/shanselman

In this short video I remind folks how Procmon and ProcExp work, how powerful they are and I learn some interesting things about GitHub for Windows!

Let me know if you find short videos like these useful, and if you do, suggest topics in the comments!

Also, a reminder, if you’ve got non-technical family or friends who want help with Windows 8, give them a YouTube Playlist designed just for them! http://hanselman.com/windows8


© 2015 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

I was chatting with Phil Haack today about a weird little bug/feature we were seeing in GitHub for Windows. I don't have the source code for the application, but I wanted to explore what was going on and get some insight so I could give Phil a decent bug report.

He and I spent some time on Skype sharing screens today and he commented "we should be recording this." So I went back and did just that.

Please take a moment and Subscribe to my YouTube Channel here: http://youtube.com/shanselman

In this short video I remind folks how Procmon and ProcExp work, how powerful they are and I learn some interesting things about GitHub for Windows!

Let me know if you find short videos like these useful, and if you do, suggest topics in the comments!

Also, a reminder, if you've got non-technical family or friends who want help with Windows 8, give them a YouTube Playlist designed just for them! http://hanselman.com/windows8



© 2015 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
     

Beginner’s Guide to WordPress User Roles and Permissions

WordPress comes with a user role management system which defines what a specific user can and cannot do on your website. Knowing these user roles and permissions are essential as your WordPress site grows. In this beginner’s guide to WordPress user roles, we will compare… Read More »

To leave a comment please visit Beginner’s Guide to WordPress User Roles and Permissions on WPBeginner.

WordPress comes with a user role management system which defines what a specific user can and cannot do on your website. Knowing these user roles and permissions are essential as your WordPress site grows. In this beginner’s guide to WordPress user roles, we will compare each WordPress user roles and permissions in an easy to follow infographic.

Out of the box when you install WordPress, there are five default user roles:

  1. Administrator
  2. Editor
  3. Author
  4. Contributor
  5. Subscriber

You can see a full comparison between each user role by viewing the infographic below:

Beginner's guide to WordPress User Roles Infographic [Thumbnail]

Alternatively, you can read the summary of each user role permissions below. We will also cover how to create new user roles and/or customize existing WordPress user roles.

Let’s start by looking at each default user role and their permissions.

1. Administrator

On a regular WordPress install, Administrator is the most powerful user role. Users with the administrator role can add new posts, edit any posts by any users on the site, and even delete those posts.

They can install, edit, and delete plugins as well as themes. Most importantly an administrator user can add new users to the site, change information about existing users including their passwords as well as delete any user (yes other administrators too).

This role is basically reserved for site owners and gives you the full control of your WordPress site. If you are running a multi-user WordPress site, then you need to be very careful who you assign an administrator user role.

We also recommend that you read this article: Should You Give Admin Access to Plugin Developers for Fixing Bugs?

2. Editor

Users with the editor role in WordPress have full control on the content sections your website. They can add, edit, publish, and delete any posts on a WordPress site including the ones written by others. An editor can moderate, edit, and delete comments as well.

Editors do not have access to change your site settings, install plugins and themes, or add new users.

3. Author

As the name suggests, users with the author role can write, edit, and publish their own posts. They can also delete their own posts, even if they are published.

When writing posts, authors cannot create categories however they can choose from existing categories. On the other hand, they can add tags to their posts (See: Categories vs Tags – Which one is better for SEO?).

Authors can view comments even those that are pending review, but they cannot moderate, approve, or delete any comments.

They do not have access to settings, plugins, or themes, so it is a fairly low-risk user role on a site with the exception of their ability to delete their own posts once they’re published.

5. Contributor

Contributors can add new posts and edit their own posts, but they cannot publish any posts not even their own. When writing posts they can not create new categories and will have to choose from existing categories. However, they can add tags to their posts.

The biggest disadvantage of a contributor role is that they cannot upload files (meaning they can’t add images on their own article).

Contributors can view comments even those awaiting moderation. But they cannot approve or delete comments.

They do not have access to settings, plugins, or themes, so they cannot change any settings on your site.

5. Subscriber

Users with the subscriber user role can login to your WordPress site and update their user profiles. They can change their passwords if they want to. They cannot write posts, view comments, or do anything else inside your WordPress admin area.

This user role is particularly useful if you require users to login before they can read a post or leave a comment.

Bonus: Super Admin

This user role is only available on a WordPress Multisite Network. Users with the super admin user role can add and delete sites on a multisite network. They can also install plugins and themes, add users, and perform network wide actions on a WordPress multi-site setup.

Customizing Existing User Roles

Default WordPress user roles are designed to have capabilities that fits the requirement of most websites. For example if you run a magazine site, then you can assign Editor user role to your senior staff and author user role to the junior staff. You can assign contributor user role to your guest authors and subscriber user role for your site visitors.

But what if you wanted to modify the permissions of an existing WordPress user role?

One thing we do not like about the author role is that not only can they publish their own posts, but they can also delete them after it’s published. This can undermine your entire editorial workflow. Also can be disastrous if a paid author leaves on bad terms and decides to delete all the posts they wrote (the ones you paid them for).

Let’s suppose that you want to modify the author user role, so that the authors cannot delete their posts once they’re published.

First thing you need to do is install and activate the Capability Manager Enhanced plugin. Upon activation, go to Users » Capabilities to modify user roles.

Editing user capabilities in WordPress

Next, select the user role you want to edit from the top box in the right column and then click the load button. This will load users capabilities in the boxes on the left.

All you need to do is uncheck the capabilities that you want to remove from that user role. For example, in this case we want to remove the capability to delete published posts from authors. We will uncheck ‘Delete Published’ capability. Once you are done, scroll down to the bottom of the page and click on the save changes button to store your settings.

Creating Your Own Custom User Roles in WordPress

You can create your own custom user roles in WordPress with your own set of capabilities by using the same Capability Manager Enhanced plugin. After installing and activating the plugin, go to Users » Capabilities and enter the user role name under ‘Create New Role’.

Adding a custom user role in WordPress

For example, a magazine site may need some staff member to actively moderate comment. In that case, you may want to create a user role that can only moderate comments. All you need to do is create a new user role, and then select the moderation comment option from under ‘Other WordPress Capabilities’.

For more detailed instructions, please see our tutorial on how to add/remove capabilities to user roles in WordPress.

We hope this article helped you understand WordPress user roles and permissions. You may also want to check out our guide on 21 great plugins to efficiently manage multi-author blogs in WordPress.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Google+.

To leave a comment please visit Beginner’s Guide to WordPress User Roles and Permissions on WPBeginner.